Top Nav

Concealed Carry with a Round Chambered

Concealed Carry with a Round Chambered

Concealed Carry with a Round Chambered

I teach concealed carry classes almost every Saturday. And it seems like every class contains a “know it all.” You know what I’m talking about. He’s the guy who wants to argue with you about everything. He claims that he knows it all and no matter what you say to explain your point he just won’t listen to you.

Now, I’ll be the first to admit that I don’t know it all. One of the beauties of teaching concealed carry classes is that I’m constantly learning from other people. They’ll tell me about a new gun I haven’t heard of or a new type of flashlight or any number of new accessories.

Anyway, recently I had a guy argue with me about carrying a 1911 “cocked and locked” and how he said he would never do it because it’s dangerous. (If you’re not familiar with what that means it means you have a round in the chamber, the hammer is cocked, and the safety is on.)

If by chance…

You happen to agree with this guy let me show you why you’re nuts and if you don’t agree with this guy let me show you why it will save your life one day. First off, if you carry a firearm concealed you’re carrying it because you want to be able to protect yourself, right?

Well… when it comes to a deadly force situation it usually happens instantly. You’ll have nanoseconds to draw your gun to take care of the threat. That’s one of the main reasons I wear an inside the waistband holster. In my opinion that’ll give you the quickest draw. (Yes, I know that open carry is quicker, but I’m not a fan of open carry, to say the least.)

I don’t recommend shoulder holsters and I certainly don’t recommend an ankle holster for your primary gun (backup only) because they take way too long to draw. Again, if the stuff ever hits the fan you want to draw quickly.

Maintaining our “quickly” theme…

When you draw you want to simply be able to pull the trigger and have it go “boom.” The last thing in the world you want to do is have to rack the slide and chamber a round. Yes, there are professionals out there who can do this lighting fast, but for 99% of gun owners having to rack a round will likely be a death sentence in a deadly force situation.

I tried to explain all of this to the guy, but of course he wouldn’t listen. Then I went on and told him to get another gun besides a 1911 such as a Glock. He told me that he thought Glock’s were even worse because they don’t have any safeties at all and he would never, ever carry a round in the chamber.

I guess the good thing is, if you or I ever come against this guy (or others who think like him) we’ll have a much quicker draw while he’s trying to rack a round in the chamber. Heck, it would be nice if criminals thought like these guys, but I have a feeling criminals aren’t worried too much about safety.

The bottom line is, if you’re carrying a gun for personal protection carry it wisely. Don’t put yourself at a disadvantage by not having a round in the chamber or by wearing an ankle holster that you have to bend all the way over to draw from. In other words, don’t be foolish when your life depends on it.

Print Friendly

,

  • Cbrittingham88

    locked and loaded always   if not its just a paper weight

  • Cbrittingham88

    locked and loaded always   if not its just a paper weight

  • Cbrittingham88

    locked and loaded always   if not its just a paper weight

  • Colby Ruffing

    I completely agree. I carry a Glock always chambered. What was he talking about a Glock not having a safety?? They have trigger safeties. When/if I ever have to draw my gun, I don’t want to waste time racking the slide. Period.

  • owl

    Well said.

  • CFairfield

    Agree with cbrittingham88.

  • Gkeil961

    Well said…… One in the tube, at all times, of you do not feel comfortable with this, get some training…… If you are not going to carry condition 1, then you mise well just leave it at home, because it is not doing much for you anyways….just my .02

    • LaymansPC

      two cents that’s worth a million bucks AND a life

  • Gkeil961

    Well said…… One in the tube, at all times, of you do not feel comfortable with this, get some training…… If you are not going to carry condition 1, then you mise well just leave it at home, because it is not doing much for you anyways….just my .02

  • usnret30

    Perhaps you should have asked him why he was in the class and what he expected to learn; particularly since he thought everything was dangerous.

    • Anonymous

      Why was he there if he already knew everything? Maybe he thought he was the instructor:)

  • Tim

    I tell my students that you may as well carry a rock if your gun’s not “ready to use”. I did have a student that was attacked this past December who did not carry one in the chamber. Luckily for him, he was able to chamber one in the scuffle with the assailant and protect himself. To this day, he doesn’t know how he did it, but had it been chambered, he most likely would not have taken a knife to the thigh.
    If you’re not chambered, you’re not ready.

  • Dsommer

    Agree 100%!!!  Why carry if you aren’t ready?

  • covertjohn

    Carrying a 1911 without being cocked & locked is much the same as attempting sex with all your clothes on

    • Yvette F

      Doesn’t sound like much fun ;)

    • The Gun Man

      :)

    • JR1221

      Ok but just a WHAT IF – the safety is ”bumped” off.. whats wrong with keeping the hammer in the de-cocked position at least with a round in the chamber? let’s be real here.. none of us are SEALS as much as “some of us” wish we were.. Lets just err on the side of caution people… you wont be laughing on a negligent discharge and a year or longer in prison..

      • Jp

        Keep it holstered and don’t pull the trigger if you don’t want accidental discharge. It’s a simple concept. No trigger pull no boom.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Stephen-Casto/100000331432370 Stephen Casto

        I can tell from your post, that you know nothing of the 1911′s safeties. To have a round go off, by accident from the condition 1 (Loaded and Cocked) position, there would have to be more than the “bumped” off. The firing pin lock would have to fail at the same time the palm safety failed at the same time the trigger is pulled (by accident) and at the same time the hammer safety fails. What are the chances of the other FOUR safeties failing at the same time?

        NOW, it you have a round in the chamber and the hammer down, you have a chance that the hammer catches on something and pulls it back far enough back and slams into the firing pin (IF the firing pin safety fails at the same time). So it would be MORE dangerous to keep the hammer down in your holster.

        The safety way to carry any 1911, is condition 1 (Loaded and Cocked) in your holster. Glocks and others are safe as well. As long as you keep your finger off the trigger, a “bumped” safety will not matter.

      • Chuckie Donn

        do revolvers have safety whats the differences between a revolver and a glock when it comes down to firing people own revolvers for a long time and the safe guys never had a problem

      • MMDeveloper

        Any 1911 I’ve owned is single action and trying to re-cock the hammer will take longer than manually racking the slide since it’s a much smaller target.

  • Inamianbedmin

    Isn’t a Glock, by design, a “safe gun”?

    • Hacker15

      Tell that to all the guys with “Glock Leg”…….

  • Eljugador

    Why not keep it unloads and in the car? That’s even safer. If you get attacked, simply ask the bad guy for a time out while you go prepare for the encounter.

  • Drew_ebert88

    i had to explain that to my girlfriend. she had been carrying her browning hi power with a half full magazine, no spare, and no round in the chamber. when i asked her why she said having a round in the chamber is dangerous and if she ever needed more than 6 rounds of 9mm FMJ that she was dead anyway. needless to say i changed her mind quick.

    • Anonymous

      If she needed more than 6 rounds, she shouldn’t have been in that fight in the first place!  That is why a revolver doesn’t provide as much protection as a semi-auto – 5/6 rounds versus 8-19 – I will take locked and loaded semi auto anytime!  

      • anonymous122

        A revolver has its own advantages.  They are simple and less likely to malfunction.  That’s why some say that it’s “six for sure instead of 15 maybes.”  Now, that doesn’t mean that semi autos are bad choices, but just stating a reason why someone would prefer a revolver.  Both have their unique attributes and tradeoffs and it’s up to each user to decide which he/she can comfortably deal with.

      • Ndreiner

        I’ll carry my .any of my 357 Mag revolvers into any situation.  I usually carry fully loaded with 12 extra rounds in speed loaders.  The way I figure it if you’re proficient that’s enough for 18 perps.  Nothing wrong with a semi auto.  It’s a whole different situation when you’re looking down the wrong end of a barrel.  I’ve been shot at before.  It was dark and the other guy ran like a scared chicken when he saw that I didn’t wet myself.  If you keep your wits about you and don’t allow yourself to panic it doesn’t matter what you carry as long as you are proficient.

        • Anonymous

          good statement

  • Anonymous

    That guy was an idiot. I always carry my Ruger cocked & locked cause I know I wont have time to rack a round when I need it. I lke inside the waist band carry also as it offers better concealment less profiling.

  • topnos

    Why carry with one in the chamber…… because I am not going to as the criminal if they can hold on while I load my gun properly….

    • Mark

      What ??????

      • Jason Seiler

        Instead of “as,” he meant “ask.” He is “not going to ask the criminal” etc., etc., etc.

  • Pat D.

    The “chamber empty carry” method has been used and promoted by the Israelis, as I recall. With training and practice, one can draw and chamber a round and fire quickly, but not as quickly as with a chambered round of course. I don’t want any additional delays, and there’s another problem: if you need to draw your weapon stealthily (e.g., you are in the rear of the Stop and Rob store when the BG enters, and you draw your pistol before he sees you) and then have to chamber a round, you can’t do this quietly. You’ve just revealed yourself.

    As anyone who’s a fan of the 1911 knows, John Browning designed it to be carried with the thumb safety OFF, relying on the grip safety. Carrying cocked and locked on  chambered round is totally safe. Negligent discharges aren’t the gun’s fault…keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot.Even with Glocks, which have no real mechanical safety. The only time I might carry with chamber empty is with a pocket gun like my Ruger LCP, if I don’t have my pocket holster (which I do use). IMHO. Whatever you do, do it the same way all the time. Otherwise, you might find yourself thinking you have a round chambered and then find out at the worst possible moment that you don’t. Fail.

  • Andyisageek

    Fiddling with a safety can even cost you a split second. Glock! Keep your finger off the “boom” lever and you’re safe! On the uneducated think Glocks are unsafe.

  • Brigade101

    I really feel for someone with that level of ignorance, I really do.

  • Badco6354

    Coked and Locked is the only way.  I want my weapon to be “Dangerous” so I can defend my self and others from the perpertrators.  As far as the Glock, they don’t call it a “Safe Action Pistol” for nothing.  The guy in your article is obviously not comfortable handeling a weapon.  The guns usually won’t shoot unless you pull the trigger, which makes your finger the best safety in the world.

  • Bdickson

    Whoops!  Spelled Cocked wrong!  Been a long day!

  • Roy

    I carry a SR9c, loaded with a round in the chamber.  I leave the safety on, and also has a trigger safety.  If i need to draw, just flip the safety off and pull the trigger.  Pretty simple.  Just person preference, but carrying a 1911 cocked and loaded just seems like an accident waiting to happen.   

  • Nomad1959

    Maybe he could paint a smiley face on it. He would then have a smiling rock for the garden

  • Firearmpop

    I carry 5 in the chamber at the same time. I have a revolver of course. DA, safe and ready. And yes inside the waist band is the only way. But above all, with whatever weapon you chose it’s PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE.

    • Redscho

      On my 82nd orbit around the sun. Racking a slide is very difficult for me now.  That’s why I carry a S&W 638-3.  5 +P JHPs always ready.

  • Justin

    I carry a 1911 cocked and locked, if you don’t you will have a better chance just throwing the gun at the assailant (it would be faster), I have also carried a Glock 19 with one in the pipe at all times, it has a tactical trigger, if your finger is not on it, it won’t fire. The true safety device on any gun is using your head, mechanical safeties are only secondary, end of story. What if your are injured and can’t rack the slide, what do you do then? My only true recommendation is that if you carry the 1911 in this condition is that you practice your draw while simutaneously disengaging the safety, until comfortable with this, do it unloaded.

    • Anonymous

       ”What if you are injured and can’t rack the slide, what do you do then?”.

      That is an excellent point. I am pretty fast at racking the slide on my Glock 19, but from now on I’ll carry with a chambered round. The most basic reasons are often the best ones. Thanks.

  • gunny 89

    Guy a flippin idiot might as well carry a rock. Locked and loaded always.

  • Had221

    why carry a weapon if you are not ready to use it?

  • 1911guy

    I must admit. When I started carrying, I was nervous about carrying a round in the chamber. For about a week, I carried with a magazine in, but no round chambered. After the week, I felt fine with a round in the chamber. Same thing with 1911s; it took me a while to get used to condition 1.

  • Anonymous

    Ive carried my glock 22 at condition 1 for years in a in waist holster never had a problem… The trigger is fully covered with a quality holster… Ive fallen on it (In holster), rolled around on the ground, seat belt has caught my holster a couple of times. It never comes out of the holster other then to clean or fire it. It stays in the holster to put in the bedside quick access safe. As my instructor said “Keep your booger hook off the bang switch until you want to make boom.” As a side note when a cop asks why i carry i tell him i can never get you to fit in my holster quite right….

    • Pat D.

      “Keep your booger hook off the bang switch…” that’s a variation I haven’t heard! :)

    • Pat D.

      “Keep your booger hook off the bang switch…” that’s a variation I haven’t heard! :)

    • Pat D.

      “Keep your booger hook off the bang switch…” that’s a variation I haven’t heard! :)

  • Stile

    The M1911 0r M1911A service model cannot be carried safely with a round chambered.  “The impact of a fall can cause the firing pin to move forward and set off a primer under certain conditions.”  Quoted directly from a NRA firearms information service FACT sheet.  I do carry my pistol with a round chambered: just be careful! 

  • Barnesville

    always one in the pipe

  • Robert Young

    Jason, that was a very nice article and your reasoning and mine agree. A concealed  or open carry weapon must be ready to fire when you present it to the target. Having to rack the slide to chamber a round will probably get you hurt or killed. Thank you for your input.

  • Hoboho

    Thanks for the article, I’m one of those empty chamber kind of guys but I think since my LCP is always double action I should rethink that.

  • Rcvbowhunter2

    This guy is not comfortable with weapons. What would he do with a revolver, no safety there!! Ihope he doesnt have to learn a lesson the hard way.

  • Rcvbowhunter2

    This guy is not comfortable with weapons. What would he do with a revolver, no safety there!! Ihope he doesnt have to learn a lesson the hard way.

  • uspshooter

    If you don’t have a round in the chamber ready to go all you are doing is concealing a real expensive club. And not a very good one at that.

    In my concealed carry classes I take a little “time out” (best to do it now than in the heat of the battle!) and engage the class to discuss the issue.  The class recognizes a knucklehead the same way you or I do and will gain an opportunity to quickly reason for themselves what is right. I always save a little time just for this.

  • uspshooter

    If you don’t have a round in the chamber ready to go all you are doing is concealing a real expensive club. And not a very good one at that.

    In my concealed carry classes I take a little “time out” (best to do it now than in the heat of the battle!) and engage the class to discuss the issue.  The class recognizes a knucklehead the same way you or I do and will gain an opportunity to quickly reason for themselves what is right. I always save a little time just for this.

  • http://profiles.google.com/vincent.barbour Vincent Barbour

    You need to have a couple of airsoft guns and appropriate protection gear on hand.  Ask anyone who maintains that opinion for a bit of a Force-on-Force exercise. You carry your gun ready to fire and he carries his needing to be cocked.  He gets to say go, an advantage he will not have in a real SD situation, and perhaps he will learn something.

  • An old guy

    I carry on a regular basis a .45 1911, a striker fired 9mm and the Ruger LCP. I alternate between one and two of the above. I have dissembled and examined all of the above and have the 1911 safety checked on a semi-annual basis (because it gets a lot of range use). I have never felt uncomfortable carrying any of them round cambered. The striker fired 9mm has three chunks of steel blocking the firing pin from falling unless the trigger is pulled. I don’t think I have ever seen a safer design and can not envision a failure even under catastrophic circumstances e.g having the gun run over by heavy truck, dropped over a hundred feet etc.  If carrying a gun with the round chambered was dangerous or unsafe IPSC and other competitions would have us start with an empty chamber, safety is always paramount with all competitions. 

    Shoulder holsters may not be for everyone and may not be the fastest. I do remember my wife asking me if I was carrying when we had to go to a bad part of town one evening and I said of course
    she said where, and I said shoulder holster and she said oh great and you are wearing a sweater like that is going to help if we get in trouble. Then she blinked and I had the .45 in my hand when she opened her eyes. All she said was wow, how? I said a lot of practice. I do not dissagree with Mr. Hanson, having your gun in a place where you can get at it fast is the best and ready to go.

  • An old guy

    I carry on a regular basis a .45 1911, a striker fired 9mm and the Ruger LCP. I alternate between one and two of the above. I have dissembled and examined all of the above and have the 1911 safety checked on a semi-annual basis (because it gets a lot of range use). I have never felt uncomfortable carrying any of them round cambered. The striker fired 9mm has three chunks of steel blocking the firing pin from falling unless the trigger is pulled. I don’t think I have ever seen a safer design and can not envision a failure even under catastrophic circumstances e.g having the gun run over by heavy truck, dropped over a hundred feet etc.  If carrying a gun with the round chambered was dangerous or unsafe IPSC and other competitions would have us start with an empty chamber, safety is always paramount with all competitions. 

    Shoulder holsters may not be for everyone and may not be the fastest. I do remember my wife asking me if I was carrying when we had to go to a bad part of town one evening and I said of course
    she said where, and I said shoulder holster and she said oh great and you are wearing a sweater like that is going to help if we get in trouble. Then she blinked and I had the .45 in my hand when she opened her eyes. All she said was wow, how? I said a lot of practice. I do not dissagree with Mr. Hanson, having your gun in a place where you can get at it fast is the best and ready to go.

  • Ocpd44

    There are only two ways to carry a 1911cop style: c&l or in a safe. However, I prefer to carry my subcompact 1911 in what looks like a camera case strapped to my side. I ride a motorcycle usually and it does not look out of place. On the rare occasions I carry my full size 1911, it is usually a yaqi slide concealed. Always, always, c&l’d.

  • Manny1879

    I couldn’t possible agree with you more!

  • Smileycj305

       Yes, cocked and locked… Why, because if you have ever read a Colt manual, on the
    1911 or any of the like set up Clones, it clearly describes Cocked and Locked as the
    preferred method of carry for said weapon…. IN THE BOOK..
       I have a Colt Commander, in .45, and my users manual clearly states, etc…
    And yes, under the circumstances, I suspect we might read about that fellow, at
    a later date…..   :(

  • Fortycal_sig

    My own opinion is that if you’re uncomfortable with a 1911 cocked ‘n’ locked, then definitely don’t carry a 1911.  I don’t know enough about 1911s to say with any certainty whether a given one is safe to carry in that config or now.  Thus I personally would carry something else, and my own advice would be that unless you’re an expert on your 1911, and take great care of it, carry a double action.  Round chambered, naturally.

  • Rick Jackson8

    Yep, keep it locked and cocked.  I will confess, though: I carry the Smith & Wesson Bodyguard 380 (inside the waist) but I keep the safety ON.  I do, though, practice drawing and thumbing the safety off so that it’s ready to fire by the time that I’m pointing it at someone.

  • Paul

    I’ve never been a fan of “cocked and locked” for the opposite reason of your student.  You have to perform one extra step, turning off the safety,. before you can fire in a panic situation.  I carry a Taurus 845 which has a safety that can  either allow for cocked and locked or it can drop the safety giving you a double action trigger pull on round one, the rest being single action.  It does allow using the safety as well after dropping the hammer, but this seems inprudent as well.  I have owned 1911′s in the past but prefer lighter polymer frame guns for full time carry.  I’m a big, bulky dude and the full sized 845 in my inside the pants holster seems just about perfect for me.

  • Anonymous

    well i hate to say this but 20ft or less the bad guy will be on u before u even draw your gun. A guy can run 15ft in less than a sec. Its a fact though. And i agree one in a chamber is the best way of going!

  • Seafoxfla

    there is only one way to carry a 1911 and that condition 1. if you don’t then carry something else.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_H5J6U2OIXVCRGKMY4DLVE45KPQ AriKona

    I carry my firearm in Condition 1 (sorry, I don’t have a 1911 so I can’t cock it and lock it).  If it is in the holster, it is chambered and ready to go upon withdrawal.  My other gun at my bedside has only one added feature and that is a Saf-T-Bloc so that a pen or other item in the drawer will not accidentally get caught in the trigger when I am awakened in the wee hours of the morning and am thinking with all my wits about me. ;-)  Since the added protection does not add any time to firing, which racking agreeably would, I figure it is worth it.  Since the Serpa holsters do not allow for anything to be inside the trigger guard, I am safe with a chambered round and no bloc.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/David-William-Loeffler/1666677695 David William Loeffler

      Cocked and Locked is Condition One.  You are carrying in Condition Zero, same as a fully loaded DA revolver.  FYI the British SAS, their equivalent of DELTA and there first, carried the Browning High Power Cocked and Unlocked, Condition Zero, for 35 years before changing to the SIG Sauer.  SAS had no negligent discharges in that time.

  • bilbo

      good article…  i carry iwb with one in the chamber – i want every tenth of a second i can find in presenting and do NOT want to risk a misfeed when the shtf…   

  • LaymansPC

    I had concerns over carrying cocked and locked at first.  To rid myself of such concerns I performed research.  After months of reading (and waiting on them to make final revisions to the design) I purchased a Sig Sauer P238, to my knowledge and extensive research it is the first and only 1911 replica that the slide can be operated in the cocked and locked state.  You can load, unload, disassemble, whatever you need to do and the gun never needs to leave the cocked and locked state (which is amazing nobody has done this before considering most accidental discharges happen when loading and unloading).  It is a double safety that disables the trigger’s hammer release as well as locks the firing pin (firing pin lock prevents something from falling in and striking the pin in the hammer area and causing an accidental discharge).  The safety on the p238 also is VERY positive, it locks into place well and doesn’t engage and disengage with just a bump of the switch, it requires a firmly planted fingertip under fairly substantial pressure to disengage.  Beyond that I simply use holsters that cover the safety switch so it cannot be disabled without drawing the weapon. I like the sig back pocket holster, the desantis cozy partner, and the kholster little moon (kholster is my favorite).

    There is never a reason to take my pistol off safety (short of a bad guy or target practice), so carrying locked and cocked no longer bothers me at all.

    @ Roy, all you do with a 1911 styled weapon is flip off the safety switch and pull the trigger too.  How is that any more or less of an accident waiting to happen than you with your SR9c?  Seems exactly the same to me…

     
     @ everyone, The safest guns in the world are the ones that don’t have some idiot’s booger-hook wrapped around the trigger.  Don’t be an idiot and research what weapon to carry and know how to carry it safely. Anyone considering a P238, don’t let the past issues with the first generations or the wait period on current generations hold you back.  It’s an amazingly accurate and reliable little pistol.  I purchased two of the plain nitron finished P238 pistols; one was made March 22 and the other made May 25, within those two months they had made 3015 of the P238s (according to the serial numbers).

    • Roy

      well, i might be just uniformed but, dropping a 1911 that is cocked and locked might go off knowing that it is in a firing position.  but dropping my SR9c with safety on and safety trigger, loaded in chamber, im guessing has a much better chance of not going off.  Just seems safer to me.  

      • Hkshawk

        Well you would be wrong about that. There is not one single documented case of that ever happening.

      • Hkshawk

        Well you would be wrong about that. There is not one single documented case of that ever happening.

      • LaymansPC

        Roy, Original 1911s maybe, but with the designs that came out a couple years later that have the firing pin block, it’s impossible.

  • http://twitter.com/CoachDB18 Daryl

    I carry a .357 Magnum, which as a 7 shot revolver is by default always chambered. It’s also SA/DA, so I’m not worried about having to cock it, just pull the trigger. Good article, and there are always opinions. Personally, I feel I have a pretty good protection for me and my family w/o feeling unsafe at all. Depends on what each individual is comfortable with.

  • Sandy

    I have carrying with a round chambered for 30+ years.  I carry a Walther PPK-S and am seriously accurate with it. I can draw, flip the safety off and fire in minimal time.  It would take much longer to access if I had to chamber a round.   I’m very comfortable with my weapon and, yes, there are larger guns available.  For concealed, for me, smaller is more easily concealed.    As a woman,  it just fits my hand better. 
     

  • Yvette F

    I used to carry my Berreta without a round chambered, safety on, etc.
    I have since learned, after 2yrs. of concealed carry, that guns just don’t “go off”, at least not the way I carry them. I got brave enough to chamber a round and keep the safety on.
    I have become much less ‘fearful’ of an accidental discharge, to the point where my new gun is a .38 special, yes, a revolver which has no safety, per se, other than the fact you’re not pulling the trigger while it’s in your holster. Cocked and locked at all times with my Beretta. It can be done, and be done safely! You just come to realize that they are harder to ‘accidentally discharge’ than you thought at first!

  • Anonymous

    I want all you guys to take it easy on this old man.  I’m a retired LEO, have been teaching for more than 35 years. I go away to HRT training every year to keep my skill set up.  I disagree with you on open carry but we can discuss that another time.  I did want to point out that there is another thought regarding the carry of a 1911 and that is cocked and UNLOCKED.  Before you all go nuts, think about this for a moment.  If your finger is never on the trigger until you’re ready to shoot (which is what we teach) why would you need another safety engaged?  I’ve carried 1911′s for years, I now carry a Glock 23.  Is there that much difference?  With a 1911 you have a grip safety, the gun can’t fire until you grip it.  Keep your finger off the trigger until you’re ready to go.  With the Glock it won’t fire until you’re finger hit’s the trigger and you disengage all three internal safety’s.  I don’t see any difference except in your mind.

  • Gardnerins

    This guys tombstone will probably read. “Here lies a guy how didn’t believe in locked and loaded.”

    “Until it was too late and the perps gun exploded” He went down in a hurry without a fight.” All the while thinking how his instructor was right.” His stubborn refusal to carry a loaded gun.” Cost him his life which can’t be undone.”

  • LaymansPC

      @ andyisageek  If knocking the safety off is part of your practiced draw, the draw is the same speed as with a Glock.  Where the 1911 styled single action trigger setup kicks the Glock’s butt is the short and extremely accurate lightweight trigger pull, which decreases the time between target acquisition and BOOM. Granted it’s only a tenth of a second or so, but it’s ten times more of a gain than what disabling a safety costs a practiced shooter.

  • Chas3359

    yes i have a 1911 by papa. i carry with a chamberd round with hammer down. i can pull the hammer back as fast as you can release the safty. its like these and thoses  what ever flotes your both. of course i’m a dummy .  i was an instructor at camp perry, police officer over 20 years, dept. range officer instructo for tx d.p.s. concelled carry instructor,  yah  just a dummie.

  • Cminzey

    Well I agree with most of what you say except with open carry, I think  that as an instructor you would be open to open or Concealed just my opinion, There still are open carry states, and I think it has a good argument for open carry

  • Rhurson

    When I first started carrying I debated this with myself. I practiced my draw from IWB with an empty chamber and griping the slide with my support hand and pushing the gun to the target racking the slide in a single motion. I believe I saw this method on the tv show personal defense or tacitical impact (i don’t remember which). That left me with not too much concern regarding the draw time to on target as it was virtually the same. What sells me on carrying with a round in the chamber (which I do) is being able to defend myself with my support hand if needed and still draw and fire with my dominant hand. If someone gets the jump on you and is right up close and personal, good luck having that support hand available to rack the slide.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/David-William-Loeffler/1666677695 David William Loeffler

    Your student was partially correct.  Cocked and Locked is “dangerous” so is crossing the street. 

    I was once asked if having a gun on my belt wasn’t “dangerous”.  My reply was, “Not to me.”

    I was asked if I knew “The hammer is cocked on your pistol?” and “Isn’t that dangerous?”  I replied, “Yes, I know.  That’s the way God and John Browning intended it to be.”

    I’ve been in the gun business about 40 years and have never heard of a firearm in good condition “going off” without a finger on the trigger, exception guns like the Nambu that were poorly designed.

    If one is going to carry a firearm for defensive purposes and does not have it ready to go he is a fool.

  • Mrgrouchy

    Soooo, I guess Mr. KnowItAll doesn’t wear a seatbelt either because if he gets into an accident he’ll have plenty of time to just click in his seatbelt before he gets thrown through the windshield…

    • Anonymous

      that is a good point and funny too =)

  • Joe

    If you feel that carrying a loaded firearm is dangerous, then give up your pistol permit.

  • Gandalfdjh

    What a waste of time – not cocked & locked is the only way to go. I guess this guy would not carry a revolver????!!! LMAO.

  • Finalwarning001

    Thank you. If you carry you need to trust your weapon. If you don’t carry it chamber loaded you don’t trust your weapon to protect you. If you don’t trust it why carry it?

  • Finalwarning001

    Thank you. If you carry you need to trust your weapon. If you don’t carry it chamber loaded you don’t trust your weapon to protect you. If you don’t trust it why carry it?

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_H7RA4FTW5PESPCBOU7DIUY6PAU Van

    While I agree that Glocks are more dangerous – no manual safety – I do agree with condition 1.
    I tend to shy way from trigger safeties, this is also why Glock recommends only certain type of holsters – ones where you can’t accidentally  snag the trigger.

  • Jason Seiler

    I am a big fan of the ‘decocker’ on my H&K P30 (9mm). It allows me to carry a round in the chamber, ready to fire, without the hammer in such a position that a safety malfunction means an unintentional, 9mm-sized entry wound in my leg.
    I have no doubt that Mr. Hanson knows what he is doing. However, one of the first lessons I learned at my NRA class was to never trust mechanical safeties. I guess it all comes down to what makes you comfortable.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_H7RA4FTW5PESPCBOU7DIUY6PAU Van

    Now, there are plenty of double action autos where condition 2 is available – one in the pipe, locked and hammer down. CZ-97 or CZ-75 comes to mind.

  • Big Gay Al

    Realistically speaking, if I leave the manual safety off, my 1911 is STILL cocked and locked until my hand closes on the grip safety.

  • Kjmill

    Carrying a handgun for personal protection, without a round in the chamber is the same as not carrying at all. I have two carry weapons, one a kimber 1911 that is always cocked and locked when on my person, and the second is an SA xd40 that has one in the chamber as well when it’s in my waistband. Hopefully I’ll never have to use either one, but if I do I won’t be pulling back the slide..only the trigger.. 

  • Gregoryawilliamson

    Cocked, Locked and ready to Rock is how my 1911′s stay!

  • R.B. Ford

    I also teach handgun carry in TN. all guns have a safety. Between your ears.

    • Anonymous

      thats funny good point too!

  • The Gun Man

    The guy is a JERK. You should always carry a gun the way it was designed to be carried. The 1911 was designed to be cocked and locked. He will be one of these people that gets shot and and askeds”why” He should be a firearms instructor for the bad guys.

  • Suegar1

    This guy sounds like a real JO.  As I write this I have a Sig, cocked & locked on my right hip.  Some friends find it strange that I carry at home [all the time] but I think it pays to be prepared.  If and when the S*** hits the fan, I don’t want to be the one on the floor bleeding.  Keep getting the word out.

    • Anonymous

      i also carry for the most part in my house, i think like u i dont want to be runing for my gun or looking for it

    • LaymansPC

      I carry in my home as well.  I’ve typically got a backup laying nearby as well.

    • Anonymous

      ME-2

  • Bobbo 45

    If this guy is too afraid to carry “loaded” then he shouldn’t be carrying at all.  He’ll probably be killed by his own gun after the perp takes it from him.

  • John

    The same people who freak out over a 1911 being carried the way John Browning intended are the same ones who carry G-Locks, Kahrs, etc. without a worry. Same thing, you have a weapon with a chambered round ready to fire. The difference is on a 1911 you see the hammer cocked, whereas you don’t on a striker fired weapon. Point out to the fantastic plastic crowd that the 1911 has 2 safeties doing the same thing their one does.

    • Anonymous

      My gun has three safeties and the major one – my brain i the most important.  You can argue about a safety being on but a mechanical part can fail – so be careful!

      • Vanphill

        Finally, someone who has done his homework!  The Brain is the best safety!

        • Stoney

          Training, Training, Training used in conjunction with the brain is the best safety.  Anyone who’s never been in a situation where the body did an adrenaline dump on you can’t imagine how faulty the brain can be without proper and constant training.  Yes, mechanical safeties can fail (as anything mechanical can), but if you think for a minute that your brain is failure proof, you might want to reconsider that thesis.

          And yes, I carry a SW1911ES cocked and locked with a 7 round magazine and with two 8 rounders my belt, and I practice shooting while moving, different distances, positions, reloads, etc…

          How safe would you feel riding with someone who only drives twice a year for a few miles and then parks the car in the holster (um, garage) and leaves it there till they have to qualify again in 6 months… explaining why in gunfights, at an average distance of 10-15 feet hit a full size human target with 3 out of 10 shots (again, on average)… these statistics came from a study of the NYPD several years ago.

          TRAINING, TRAINING, TRAINING… and PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE,… it’s how you get to Carnegie Hall in the old joke, and it’s how you stay alive if you ever get in a bad situation you can’t avoid.

          Stoney
          {who’d rather be overcautious (and over trained) than underground}

    • Starwalker_wa

      My current carry piece has two safeties plus a firing pin lock, I believe.  The Springfield Armory XD-45 has a grip safety similar to the original 1911, plus a trigger safety like the Glock except it is metal, not plastic.  The most important two safeties don’t come with the gun, but by proper training.  They are the brain and the finger not in the trigger guard except to fire.

      • LawDog2005

        I have an XDM because of the grip safety. I like having 2 passive safeties instead of one. I also believe in having one in the chamber. If you see people in a life and death situation, they’re lucky to even get the gun out of the holster let alone mess with a manual safety. When your heartrate goes up, your fine motor skills go down.

    • Tom1776866

      Carrying a 1911 is a joke today, my glock is the more accurate weapon at half the weight. A 1911 is an ego choice not a protection choice

      • Dagwood6420021

        carying a 1911 is not an ego choice it’s a good choice if you know how too use it,if not you go with something you feel comfortable with .too many people dont understand the difference of handling a weapon at the range and shooting at a target that is returning fire

        • Paul

          I wouldn’t put it down as an ego choice.  I am a .45 ACP fan and have several modern guns chambered for it.  I have owned a number of 1911′s over the years.  At the end of the day I prefer the modern guns which are lighter and have a larger capacity for full time concealed carry.  The design is 100 years old and was impressive in its day for may reasons..  I plan on buying one this year to commemorate its centennial but I will stick with my Taurus guns for daily carry,

          • Rudej

            taurus judge-kel tek p11–45 long colt is way more powerfull than a acp–and 410 ammo–get real–a 1911 is a true sing of a realy small penis–i think–and fully cocked and locked–kinda gay–but thats just me

      • Maple1960

        Tom,
         I agree 110%, I own a 26, 19 ,17 , I carried these on duty
         We can carry 2 glocks to one 1911 wieght wise. That increases
        the rounds and options. The gen 4 is on my Christmas list.
        Papa313 

      • Malbert49

        You have no idea what you are talking about!

        • Brandy

          I carry a Springfield EMP… great for concealed carry if you ask me! Holds 9+1 and that’s all I need with a 3″ barrel… very consistent and great shooting gun. I would never carry a glock, my uncle owns a few and I hate them! I think a lot of people would after shooting what I carry :) This is my Colt Anaconda 44 and my Springfield EMP 9 :)

      • Ldgrey1963

        I own several weapons and I carry a Colt lightweight Commander, as far as the 1911 being carried as a ‘Joke’ well I believe the joke is on you. Accuracy is more in the aim of the individual and not weapon. The glock is a fine weapon for the price, but the 1911 is the most sought after and easily customized for any type of shooter male or female. My choice is for a weapon that I admired as a young boy, now that I own 2 of them I will undoubtly purchase several more. I owned a Glock 23, it was a steaming pile and I was so glad to dump it. I own 2 sigs, 2 1911′s, 3 Rugers, 1 Walther P1 and a Hi-Point 4595TS .45 ACP, add in several .22 Cal rifles. I will not own a Glock unless I can purchase one cheap ($150-$200) and then I will only use it as a range gun, I will NEVER trust another Glock.

      • Anonymous

        I am sure that, Clock is no more accurate than a 1911.  I don’t like the feel of a  double stack pistol stock on any pistol.  (Personnal preference)…   So, because my 38 Super Auto Colt Commander weight is less than a full size 45 ACP, it is my preferred concealed carry.  8 round mag, one in the pipe – Cocked, locked and loaded.  When I’m asked “Is that not dangerous?”  I reply “You’re damn right it is.”

      • Rudej

        exactly!!!!!

      • http://profile.yahoo.com/GM5LXS6IHVQWCWMTI6TC7RO4EA John

         If carrying a 1911 is joke, then its a really bad joke. The punch line: 230 gr’s  of bullet coming at you at 850 fps. That, by all means,is’nt very funny. As for carrying concealed, not everybody can do that. I can all day. As for accuracy, not knocking your Glock, I’ll shoot against it any day. Why: I have practiced enough with a 1911 to become confident and proficient with it. I know what it can and cannot do. It served many a service man for 100 years.

      • Cory

        You get what you pay for, a .45 is not always as good as another .45… A highpoint is not the same as a Sig… that is to say there are lesser quality 1911′s and then there are 1911′s guaranteed to be at least on par with any glock as far as accuracy is concerned. But still… a human is a bigger target than you realize and self defense situations aren’t typically at range distances.

        PS: My XD .45 Tactical 5″ Barrel is not only an Ego Choice, but more accurate than your Glock ;)

    • Danomcconnell

      I own a 1911. On the rare ocassions that I do carry it – I always carry it cocked-and-locked. It is one of my favorite pistols – I absolutely LOVE shooting it - however, I do not use it for my primary PPD. It is too heavy and gives me no more rounds than the Kahr P-45 that I DO carry for my primary PPD. The Khar is a simple draw-and-shoot pistol with no mechanical safety to have to remember to disengage. I ALWAYS carry my Khar with a round in the chamber and the weapon’s only safety is my finger – don’t pull the trigger and it won’t go BOOM. As far as having actually had to use a firearm where survival was on the line: Been-there-done-that.
      As far as the “firearm snobs” out there who want to stand on the corner and preach to the heavens that “theirs is the best”; I can only say…What works is best. Whatever a person is comfortable with, is proficient with, and can operate instinctively without having to stop and think about it, should be the weapon of choice for that person. What someone else likes is irrelevant. If it work for you and it works every time – that is all that matters.
      Whatever a person chooses for their PPD – They must Practice-Practice-Practice-Practice…Otherwise they are just Wannabees.

      • Anonymous

        good point!

      • Anonymous

        good point!

      • Rudej

        first smart response here–my thought is ccw should be dao-double action only-long trigger pull will save your leg-only problem is you have to practice to hit acuratly- shooting skills, like all skills are perishable–i have a keltec p11–paper plate at 25 yds- a box of 9mm a week to stay in shape-my “realy bad area gun” is a taurus judge- nothing beats 410 ammo for self defence- and isnt that what we realy only need-we arent the police–people need to remember that and face it–most, or at least a lot of ccw’s cant hit the broad side of a barn–and having carried (illegaly, untill recently) for over 20yrs- and being a gunsmith–i say carrying a 1911 cocked and locked is kinda stupid–there is a 1/2 cocked option that is way safer-thumb safe off-draw and cock–use the grip safe-its there for a reason–or-use the new tech and get a realy safe double action and –practice practice practice !!!! and to all the other truckers out there – read up on the laws–print them out–dont be a dot inspection revenue sorce-put a lock on one of your cabinet doors–wow–truckers do yak like a bunch of old women–be safe

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Stephen-Casto/100000331432370 Stephen Casto

      There are actually 5 safeties (4 on some older ones) on a 1911, when it is in condition 1 (loaded and cocked)

  • Rogcat1

    You can’t convince me that in a panic situation that you will have the wits about you to remember to take the safety off, or even worse if your wife carries as mine does, that she will remember to take the safety off.  My wife carries a Taurus Pro119 with a round in the chamber, and I carry a Taurus Pro140.  There is enough trigger pull required to discharge the firearm, that we feel it’s a safe carry with one in the chamber.

    • Anonymous

      The safety comes off when you present the tool….  It’s automatic like remembering to get it out of the holster when you need it.

  • Usafts

    My Glock was designed to only discharge when the trigger is depressed. This is exactly what I need and want in a defensive handgun. The “Safety” is all between my ears. My training, practice and common sense give me a competent confidence with all of my guns that will likely save my life or the life of another in the event that it becomes necessary to use deadly force. I don’t believe in accidental discharges and anyone who “accidentally” shoots themselves or someone else, DOES NOT have enough training and confidence with their equipment…and should probably rethink the idea of owning firearms. Trained, competent, confident, locked, loaded and situationally aware… is the only responsible and safe way to carry a defensive weapon.

  • TheOldCrab

    All of my pistols have chambered rounds and not locked.  The safety is my finger and I would rather gave the gun go boom instead of me yelling bang at the perpetrator.  Otherwise leave the pistol at home locked up.

  • demgunner

    I agree with the malcontent in the class; with a 1911 you still have to take off the safety and glocks don’t even have one.  My Ruger lets me just pull the double action trigger on the first one then semi auto for the rest if they are necessary.

    • LPC

      Many simply don’t like the long trigger pull of double action.  Ask any competition shooter what they use, 99 out of 100 will tell you single action.

      Personal defense where the bang will most likely make the bad guy run in fear, DA is ok.  I personally want to STOP any badguy coming at me, not scare him away to go get his own gun.  I want all the quickly attainable accuracy possible; that quite simply means single action only.

  • HKSHawk

    I myself carry various sizes of .45 caliber Para Ordnance pistols.  I too recommend cocked and locked as the carry method of choice.  But weapons carry is a very personal and individual thing.  There is no one single right or wrong way to do it.  The 1911 design is not for everyone.  Perhaps your wayward student should locate a CZ-75 type weapon.  Perhaps a Tanfoglio or EAA Witness.  These can be carried either C&L, Double action first shot, or hammer down on a loaded or unloaded chamber as the carrier prefers.  They are easily converted between calibers from .22 up through .45 for different purposes.  While tactical supplies such as holsters for these are often difficult to locate the flexibility of the weapon warrants the effort.

  • TXiceman

    an unload gun is nothing but a club….

  • rbgiantfan

    I own a 1911 but don’t use it for carry simply because I am not that big of a guy and would have difficulty concealing.  I do carry a kel-tec pf9 which has no safety but is a dao pistol.

    I would definitely carry the 1911 cocked & locked with total confidence.  A). I’d hate to slow down for an unnecessary racking of the slide  and B).  If you don’t trust the safey on your 1911 then take it to a gunsmith :-)

  • karle

    really simple way to “teach” this guy about needing a round in the chamber is to have him “practice” against someone with a rubber knife with an airsoft pistol…….then he will see the error of his ways….or u could show him videos of this since there are quire a few on u-tube

  • Jnpavia

    R-E-V-O-L-V-E-R

  • Cl6man

    yes, its safe but…..if you really think its quick, I would suggest that you may have never tried to draw a weapon quickly and shoot it against someone trying to kill you.  I have had some experience in real life….when you draw do you think you’ll remember to flick the safety off…?  Maybe, maybe not…..that is why its my personal humble opinion that the only truly quick way to get a round off is with a double action something…revolver, semi auto or whatever with no safety involved.  I personally dont like cocked and locked guns without a safety because its too easy to shoot your own foot off or shoot yourself in the leg.  being aware of one’s surroundings is the best defense…..know where you are,. who is around and constantly asses threat/s….be ready…because if you get into a fast draw contest with me, when I already have my gun out, by definition youve lost.  but I agree with your assesment that its better than racking a round and pulling the trigger is better than racking or thumbing a safety off.

  • Jeff

    I am most familiar with a Glock (owned 3 so far), so I made it a point to learn the inner mechanics of it. Unless the ammo is extremely faulty and prone to the primers firing without being struck, or it’s thrown in a fire, it is physically impossible for a Glock to fire without the trigger being pulled. That’s why I love my serpa holster, but any holster that covers the trigger will be sufficient

  • http://www.highcalibersystemsllc.bravehost.com Alvin Palmer

    Whether you carry ‘locked and loaded’ or not:

    I’ve taught CCW in Louisiana since 1996 and I would add
    one additional comment:  Gabe Suarez of One Source Tactical, Suarez International
    USA recently had an article in which he said he had thought of a new proposition
    on trigger finger placement/control that he knew would create a LOT of
    discussion. [And it has]  I will paraphrase
    his article:

    He suggested that the RANGE training and indoctrination for placement of
    the trigger finger alongside and above the trigger guard when withdrawing and
    presenting your weapon to your target, then placing the finger upon the trigger
    to fire your weapon will put you at high risk in a sudden violent confrontation
    when fractions of a second count.  Why?  Because you will perform as you have
    practiced – first by placing your finger as trained then ATTEMPTING to find the
    trigger while in a high stress situation. 

    Gabe recommended following RANGE rules and procedures WHILE ON THE RANGE,
    but range rules and conditions do not follow ‘real life’ street situations.

    He suggested trying this: [AFTER FIRST MAKING SURE YOUR WEAPON IS NOT
    LOADED – WITH SOMEONE TO VERIFY] present your weapon from your usual carry
    position as fast as possible, acquire your target and IMMEDIATELY ‘dry fire’
    your piece  by placing your trigger
    finger DIRECTLY upon the trigger – and pulling it.

    I thought about this a few minutes and decided to try his idea.  The first 2 or 3 efforts were complete
    fumbles!!  I had difficulty quickly
    finding the trigger – in a non-confrontational situation!  With practice this difficulty has vanished.  I now point this out to my students.

    Think about it.  Try it. 
    I think he has a strong point; others may not, your choice.

    I’ve taught CCW in Louisiana since 1996 and I would add
    one additional comment:  Gabe Suarez of One Source Tactical, Suarez International
    USA recently had an article in which he said he had thought of a new proposition
    on trigger finger placement/control that he knew would create a LOT of
    discussion. [And it has]  I will paraphrase
    his article:

    He suggested that the RANGE training and indoctrination for placement of
    the trigger finger alongside and above the trigger guard when withdrawing and
    presenting your weapon to your target, then placing the finger upon the trigger
    to fire your weapon will put you at high risk in a sudden violent confrontation
    when fractions of a second count.  Why?  Because you will perform as you have
    practiced – first by placing your finger as trained then ATTEMPTING to find the
    trigger while in a high stress situation. 

    Gabe recommended following RANGE rules and procedures WHILE ON THE RANGE,
    but range rules and conditions do not follow ‘real life’ street situations.

    He suggested trying this: [AFTER FIRST MAKING SURE YOUR WEAPON IS NOT
    LOADED – WITH SOMEONE TO VERIFY] present your weapon from your usual carry
    position as fast as possible, acquire your target and IMMEDIATELY ‘dry fire’
    your piece  by placing your trigger
    finger DIRECTLY upon the trigger – and pulling it.

    I thought about this a few minutes and decided to try his idea.  The first 2 or 3 efforts were complete
    fumbles!!  I had difficulty quickly
    finding the trigger – in a non-confrontational situation!  With practice this difficulty has vanished.  I now point this out to my students.

    Think about it.  Try it. 
    I think he has a strong point; others may not, your choice.

    • Pat D.

      “Gabe’s” method (and I have trained personally with Gabe a long time ago)is exactly what we do in training and in USPSA matches, as I think you’ve described it: staging the trigger. Several thoughts: On a Glock on others with a longer trigger pull that is almost a 2-stage break, you can “stage” or prep the trigger while bringing it on target, and then all you have is a short crisp press to break the shot. This is fine in competition, but there are two dangers in making this a habit and using it in a defensive scenario: 1) you don’t always need to break the shot in a defensive situation, even if it’s escalated to having your finger on the trigger and the gun on the BG; 2) if you alternate between something like the Glock and a 1911 with it’s shorter, crisper trigger with little slack and a 3-4# pull, and you have your finger on the trigger as you bring the gun up, you may inadvertently fire the gun. This would be true in a startle reflex situation too, especially with the 1911′s lighter, crisper pull. It’s important to train like you’d need it in real life, and not create bad/unsafe habits. IMHO

  • http://www.highcalibersystemsllc.bravehost.com Alvin Palmer

    [sorry about the double entry - something mess up!]

  • TB

    I’ve had so many personal malfunctions in practice, (pressing the trigger without offing the safety first), that for me, a revolver or Glock have proven to be my best options.  Draw, aim, and press.  Reaction with a smooth draw and soft press, that’s all the function I’ll require of myself under pressure. 

    Carrying with an empty chamber is better than not carrying at all, but you’ve sure got a lot more to prepare for and more opportunity for malfunctions.  

  • Hacker15

    Currently, I work as a Court Deputy and have previously been involved in law enforcement for many years.  The only time I carried without one up was when I started out with a S&W Model 10 (about 42 years ago).  Back then, you carried 5 rounds in a 6 round cylinder, with an empty chamber under the hammer.    When we got our next issue revolver, we were told it’s now safe to carry a live round under the hammer ’cause there were several safty features built into the pistol.  In all my years, I have carried everything from the old model 10 through several different semi-auto’s (Glock, S&W, etc.).  From the time we traded the old Model 10, I have never carried in an ‘unloaded’ state – one up (or, with a revolved, one under the hammer), full mag in the pistol, with at least two backup mags on my duty belt.  Never had an accidental or unintended discharge (at least not with that shooting iron ;-)

  • Anonymous

    My husband and I discussed this issue when we first started teaching concealed carry classes.  I carry cocked and loaded, ready to fire without having to rack a slide but he does the opposite.  Since it takes only 1.5 seconds for a perp to cover 21 feet that doesn’t give you time to get the gun out, rack it and then get the target in sight – so a round is always ready to shoot.  

  • CMNIII

    Cocked & locked is the ONLY safe way to carry a 1911 (unless it’s unloaded). No round in the chamber=50 ozs or iron rock on your hip.

  • Joe S.

    Jason. What do you do in the summer time when you want to carry concealed? I mean, you can’t wear a jacket when it’s 90 out. You say you wear an inside the belt holster. I take it you have your shirt tail out then? Your scenarios about circumstances happening real fast aren’t the norm,,,are they? I mean, When you walk into a bar,,or a store or restaurant, you might find yourself involved in a robbery and might want to keep your cool and not draw until the situation allows you too. An ankle holster is perfect in THOSE situations. My way of carrying is dependent on the weather. In winter, I carry under my coat. In summer, I carry an ankle holster. Again, a majority of folks won’t find themselves in a life or death situation. If they do, there is a good chance there will be ample time to draw from a place where the perps least expect it.  Oh, I”m not a know it all either. Simply my opinion. Thank you for your article.

    • Paul

      I carry year round with a Taurus 845 in a “tuckable” IWB holster.  Because I like the laser sight and nobody was making a holster I liked for that combination, I made my own and it works very well.  In cooler weather I wear a vest or jacket and don’t tuck it in under my shirt.  I also at times carry a Millenium pro .45 in a front pocket holster when wearing cargo pants or shorts.  My physical bulk makes concealment easier for me.  I play Santa wiithout the need for padding.  I also have a couple of fanny pack holsters for when my clothes can’t adquately conceal the gun.

    • Firefighterchen

      Conceal carriers usually have the outer layer untucked to conceal the handle (outside or inside waistband)…

      Yes the normal defense situation is fast, really fast, under 5 seconds fast…within 20 feet.

      The unusual circumstance that you happen to come upon a robbery, your best bet is to run away, but if you can’t for any reason, then the ankle holster is the last place I would want to draw from…say you some how do keep your cool (not likely btw), reaching down to your ankle is a much more noticeable movement then a hand to the hip.

      I agree the majority will never use their handguns in defense…I disagree that there will be ample time if they do…if you believe that, do you also believe you shouldn’t carry one in the chamber because there is ample time time rack?

  • Fdesantis

    A glock is a very safe gun to anyone who has spent time training in the use of handguns. It will only go boom when you pull the trigger. My finger and brain are perfectly capable safeties, thank you very much, and I only carry it in a kydex IWB goatee that covers the trigger guard.

    The 1911 cocked and locked is also safe, though it’s clear how some can be uneasy. The gun can’t fire without the grip safety depressed so even in the unlikely event that the frame safety is inadvertently clicked off the gun is still not going to discharge in the holster.

    Frame safeties are more for a new gun owners peace of mind, save for a single action gun like a 1911.

  • Sharkey5103

    I always carry my 1911 cocked and locked. You always need to respect the firearm and not be negligent, but if this guys wants to carry and is afraid of the weapon, he may be as dangerous as someone who doesn’t respect it. It also sounds like he doesn’t understand the internal working of his firearm which is another problem with someone who wants to carry. You have to know how your firearm works if you are to b safe and responsible with it.

  • Ultraironhead

    I always tell people “What are you going to do if you get tackled to the ground or the bad guy grabs your weak hand or you are pinned down in a way where your weak hand is incapacitated?”.  That usually settles the argument.

  • Anonymous

    Well i will say i don’t like the glock, nothing personal i don’t like the feel of it in my rather large hands.  I like the 1911 but i have a fondness for my CZ P07 (double action).    Just tell them to practice not putting the finger on the trigger till you have cleared your body.

  • Chapedskiba

    I carry a 1911 LWT Commander. At first I was leary of cocked and locked. then, after reading MANY articles, I realized that without cocked and locked I might as well be carrying a brick. Now I wouldn’t carry my Colt any other way.

  • Filmsmith

    I totally agree with option 1. I carry a sig 1911 c3… in the waiste band holster. I carry it every day like that, with a spare mag in my pocket. I have a habit of reaching to check the thumb safety frequently… i’ve found it off once or twice. But if your finger isn’t on the trigger it’s as safe as a hammer.

  • Ldgrey1963

    I have 2 1911′s and I carryed them cocked and locked the way Mr. Browning intended them to be carried, until 1 day. I was removing the full size 1911 from a thunderwear conceilment holster at the end of the night and I noted the safety became disengaged, I about S#*T myself because this 1911 was a built one and it has some quirks, I no longer carry that 1911. I relegated it to a ‘range/home defense weapon, not a conceiled carry weapon. My newer 1911 Colt Lightweight Commander has a stronger safety but I still carry it hammer down and 1 in the pipe (until I complete my ‘shake-down’ and can trust it’s safety). Meanwhile I am looking for a good pancake holster with a thumb-break, I reckon when I find the holster I like, I will go back to ‘cocked and locked’. When I carry either of my SIGS I carry 1 in the pipe and hammer down like they were intended to be carried. I would trust the word of Mr. Jason R. Hanson over a ‘range rambo’ any day of the week. I guess the moral of this story is… If you conceil carry cocked and locked, you had better make DAMN sure your weapon’s safeties are functioning 100% so you do not have a neglient discharge or worse an incident that kills or wounds someone.

  • Ldgrey1963

    I have 2 1911′s and I carryed them cocked and locked the way Mr. Browning intended them to be carried, until 1 day. I was removing the full size 1911 from a thunderwear conceilment holster at the end of the night and I noted the safety became disengaged, I about S#*T myself because this 1911 was a built one and it has some quirks, I no longer carry that 1911. I relegated it to a ‘range/home defense weapon, not a conceiled carry weapon. My newer 1911 Colt Lightweight Commander has a stronger safety but I still carry it hammer down and 1 in the pipe (until I complete my ‘shake-down’ and can trust it’s safety). Meanwhile I am looking for a good pancake holster with a thumb-break, I reckon when I find the holster I like, I will go back to ‘cocked and locked’. When I carry either of my SIGS I carry 1 in the pipe and hammer down like they were intended to be carried. I would trust the word of Mr. Jason R. Hanson over a ‘range rambo’ any day of the week. I guess the moral of this story is… If you conceil carry cocked and locked, you had better make DAMN sure your weapon’s safeties are functioning 100% so you do not have a neglient discharge or worse an incident that kills or wounds someone.

  • Spike Dawg

    Some people are born to be idiots. I never argue with an idiot because it brings me down to their level and that’s not where I like to be. Cocked and locked is how you carry a 1911. If that doesn’t work for the guy, he should consider a DOA revolver. No arguing is necessary. Idiots like to have it their way and failing to argue gets them there faster.

  • Spike Dawg

    Some people are born to be idiots. I never argue with an idiot because it brings me down to their level and that’s not where I like to be. Cocked and locked is how you carry a 1911. If that doesn’t work for the guy, he should consider a DOA revolver. No arguing is necessary. Idiots like to have it their way and failing to argue gets them there faster.

  • Badman400

    If there ain’t one in the pipe, you may as well have a rock in your pocket.

  • Badman400

    If there ain’t one in the pipe, you may as well have a rock in your pocket.

  • r. smitty

    I have a friend that worked for a sheriffs office and he had a supervisor that didn’t like him carrying his 1911 cocked and locked.  She said it intimated the public.  So, to appease her he carried it chambered and hammer down.  Mistake!  I can’t remember  if he was drawing or re-holstering when he accidentally fanned the hammer and put a round through his calf.  He now, of course, says the only way to carry a 1911 is cocked and locked and I agree.

  • r. smitty

    I have a friend that worked for a sheriffs office and he had a supervisor that didn’t like him carrying his 1911 cocked and locked.  She said it intimated the public.  So, to appease her he carried it chambered and hammer down.  Mistake!  I can’t remember  if he was drawing or re-holstering when he accidentally fanned the hammer and put a round through his calf.  He now, of course, says the only way to carry a 1911 is cocked and locked and I agree.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Tim-Montoya/1402180006 Tim Montoya

    Are you sure he wasn’t an imposter? Does he even own a gun? Crazy how some think.

  • Eschum1

    The only way to carry

  • Viperjuice

    Well, I can kind of see where he’s coming from. I kind of felt a bit unsure the first time I carried my S&W 1911 PD cocked and loaded after S&W took 3 freaking months to fix the safety on it. I don’t think it’s just me but I don’t think the hammer is suppose to release and hit the firing pin when you pull the trigger with the safety on.. As for the Glock, I see no problem at all with carrying a Glock 23 with a round chambered.

  • NFTATraining

    Well, most gun fights happen 10-15 FT so when he dies because he couldn’t get a round off, well…. you tried. What a douche bag, That gun was designed to be cocked and locked while carrying, and any other firearm should have one chambered.. period, if you aren’t going to carry with one chambered then you shouldn’t carry period. The end.

  • Anonymous

    I think the student’s viewpoint comes up regularly in the various gun forums. I think the concern is a fairly common one among folks new to handguns in general, and not just specific to the 1911. That is, I’ve seen people express concern about having a round in the chamber in any gun, not just the 1911. They need familiarity and probably repetition of a theme from sources they consider ‘authorities’ or ‘experts’, and of course they need to better under both weapons and why they are carried.

  • http://www.facebook.com/vincentbill Bill Vincent

    As other have said, if there isn’t a round in the pipe, it’s just ballast, and you may as well leave it at home. Some people watch too much television.

  • Genorad99

    I carry cocked and locked when a 1911 is in the holster.  When I carry a revolver, it is loaded.  My single actions don’t matter cause they have to be cocked before firing.  An unloaded concealed carry weapon is a good paperweight, not much more!

  • Dan

    Obviously this guy isn’t smart enough to learn how this weapon was designed to be carried, and is scared it might go boom. Too bad he can’t learn what all the safety’s are for. He better hope the bad guy is willing to hang on while he loads his gun.

  • Anonymous

    Apparently he has never shot a 1911 or spent any time learning about it! 1911′s have always beeb cocked and locked for as long as I know.
    Bones

  • Dgearke

    We do a demonstration of the Tueller principle/21 foot rule in all of our classes. This involves my training partner attacking me from about 20 feet with a “blue” knife, and me attempting to draw my XDm (with training barrel installed) and get the laser on him. In 7 months of training classes I managed it once (but I anticipated his attack, shh, don’t tell him). I’d just invite “that guy” to attempt the same drill while racking the slide. I’d even give him 30 feet on that one!

    • Anonymous

      that is what i said too!!!!!

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ZI4R35UPWAJLQD3MZGU3JV5SPA Hutch Carey

    Fumble w/a slide…in a dark parking garage, elevator etc? No thank, Sir!

  • Walker

    Is it just me… Or is “common sense” dead? Hell, even my pocket pistol has one in the chamber, and safety off….

    • LPC

      Yes, common sense died with John Browning.  There is nothing left but us and the flaming maroons.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_GUEBM2RUGRY7W7RLBXDSC5NOCM Doug

    I own two 1911′s but don’t carry them. I searched out my carry weapons carefully firing and operating many different weapons before settling on my carry choice. I chose to carry Bersa Thunder 380′s. I own three of them now and love the gun. I do carry the weapon with a full tube with all safety’s off and hammer down. Since this gun is a double action on first round it enables me the safety of having a hot tube thats just a trigger pull away. After the first round it is in automatic mode for next 7 rounds. The Beras’s are the best of both worlds. I dearly love my 1911′s but for carry I feel totally safe with a Bersa. JMHO

  • Grim

    Good article. A locked and cocked 1911 is a very safe way to carry. As long as well as the weapon and the operator are properly maintained. Maintaining the operator through regular training is the key. The operator (YOU) is the one part of your self defence package that that requires the most attention and with out that attention, will let you down EVERY time!

  • Anonymous

    Guy sounds like the idiotic federal agent who chastised me for carrying with a chambered round. He also assured me that I don’t carry a weapon for the same reason he does. Yah, right. 

  • Anonymous

    If you’re actually carrying the thing, one in the chamber. There’s times in my life where I may have to dress a certain way and subsequently carry the gun in a messenger bag or the like. In that situation if I don’t have a manual safety (like my glock) then I wont chamber because I don’t always know exactly where my gun is (shifting or whatnot). Of course I have no fantasies about getting it out on time but its still nice to have with me. You never know.

  • Ironman0509

    This guy gives gun owners a bad name. What a moron.

  • David

    Life is difficult. It is even more difficult when you are stupid. Carry it cocked and locked. You need to have an educated trigger finger during the drawstroke.

  • Tfisherz77

    This guy is better off carrying a knife.

  • OlympicFox

    Back in the old days before Glocks came on the scene, it was USCG SOP to carry your DUTY 1911 without a round in the chamber – that was rule.  Of course the rule was written by the high ranking brass that didn’t need to carry.& didn’t know diddly about the real world anyway. 

    The theory was that if you had reason to believe a situation was imminent, then you’d stop, lock’n'load and proceed. 

    Beside the fact that there’s no rule saying that you’ll always have time to stop, lock’n'load there was one time I know of when the stuff looked like it might hit the fan, so the guys stopped, chambered a round and reholstered.  Only, in the stress of the moment one of the officers left his finger in the trigger guard when he reholstered.  Shot his partner in the thigh.  Oops.

    That’s the only real world incident that I have personal and direct knowledge of involving carrying a 1911 and the theoretically safest way didn’t work out so well.

  • Stoney

    The guy who said he’d never carry a gun with a round in the chamber probably drives his car with no gasoline in the tank too…

    Actually, he’s already cocked and locked.  He’s going off half cocked, and his mind is locked.

  • Smithjcs370

    I recently took a 4 day defensive hand gun course at Front Sight in Las Vegas. The Instructors demonstrated what would happen to you if you carried you weapon without a round chambered or tried to give a command for the attacker to stop. One Instructor gave the commands the other fired a drawn weapon into a target (as the attacker). In every case the attacker got off 4 to 5 shots. At 7 to 21 feet which most likely will be the distance of a gun fight to save your life or the life of a loved one you will be dead!!! So want did we learn? If you are not going to carry with a round chambered then don’t carry at all no matter what type of handgun you carry. Why? because you are only going to get yourself or someone else shot. So just how safe are you being then? Also if you are not mentally ready to take someone elses’s life in self defense than don’t carry. Guys this is just the reality of dealing with bad folks.

  • Gunslinger

    Revolver (double action) nuff said

  • Tom

    The most difficult thing for me about becoming a concealed carry licensee is the choice to carry a holstered pistol with a round in the chamber.

    Of course it is the only logical decision if the pistol will be needed the split second that a threat is made to you and your family.

    My entire life with guns, before concealed carry was always removing the ammo from any gun which was not in use for shooting or hunting!

    Never would my Dad allow a loaded gun to enter the truck, or the home.

    I don’t know if he would be carrying a gun today, but a carried pistol needs to be ready to shoot when it is pulled from the holster.

    Viettom

  • Tom Staples

    I agree with you. I carry a Walther PPS 40 with a round chambered for the very reason you said…….”I want to fire when I pull the trigger”. I may not have time to ‘play it safe’ and chamber a round to get the bad guy.

  • Starwalker_wa

    John Browning designed the 1911 to be carried in Condition One, cocked and locked.  When I carried one, it was cocked and locked and I felt quite comfrotable with it in that mode.  I was at a swap meet one day, and a woman told me my gun was cocked, “isn’t that dangerous?”  I smiled at her and replied, “Sure is ma’am, for any idiot who tries to attack me.”  BTW, I was an LEO at the time, and about five inches in front of my gun was my badge.

  • Anonymous

    I carry my 229 chambered and ready for a double action pull. The idea of having to rack the pistol when someone is trying to kill you is unimaginable to me. Doing that to yourself intentionally is only more so.

  • anonymous122

    For utmost readiness, a 1911 is designed to be carried in condition 1 “cocked and locked” and is perfectly safe to do so as long as the user is competent.  As for a Glock, the lack of external safeties does not make it inherently unsafe so long as you obey the basic rules.  Assuming external safeties are defeated, if any are present, and a round is chambered, no properly functioning gun will discharge unless you pull the trigger.

  • Tom1776866

    Always carry your weapon loaded. A 1911 as a personal carry is a very poor choice today, given the selection of lighter pistols of a decent caliber, also its ofetn the load not the caliber that stops felons. In the seconds you have to react and fire seldom do you have time or thought for rack and fire. Unfortunately the firearm community is not immune from the ignorant- these are the folks who ‘ accidently kill’ themselves while cleaning their weapon.

  • Jfj1of1

    I actually ran into a Guy like that. There was a dog food recall and I had been running all day to find my dogs food because of a medical condition he had anyway he seen I has boughtthe last of that particular brand when when I was opening the door to my car he grabbed my shoulder and told me to give him some of the food that I just purchased. Well not knowing what was going on I grabbed my firearm and drew on him by the time I drew my weapon he was pulling his weapon and trying to rack it. Luckily No shots were fired. I must have scared him because he dropped his gun and started to run then he turned around said he was sorryandd asked for his gun back I told him forget it and he could pick his gun up when the police contacted him. Anyway I called the police and they came and picked up the gun I told them that I had found it. I understand that socially some people don’t no how to act and that all he had to do was ask and this whole situation could have been avoided. That’s why I will never carry without one in the chamber.
    sincerely
    Jeff from Michigan

  • Dragonbreath

    Your trainee was right, cocked and locked IS dangerous – but so is ANY loaded weapon.  I’d be much more worried about the trainee’s mind-set; he’s trying to set “rules” for dangerous encounters.  The simple fact is that real world combat doesn’t follow any rules, which is why we train for anything and everything.

    • Anonymous

      good statement!!!!!

  • Anonymous

    First of all, this was a great article and second it pushed alot of buttons i can see. I think who ever owens a 1911 has commented on this piece lol. I think if u carry a gun that has a plastic trigger guard around the trigger, like people have said it will never go off, but  ur chances go up if it is all  nylon holster with ur gun not having any safties on it.

  • Redeemedson1

    I personally carry an XDM .40 with no safeties at all except the beaver tail built into the grip and I would never even consider leaving my bedroom without a chambered round. Always prepare for the worst and even the worst will not be so bad….

  • Redeemedson1

    I personally carry an XDM .40 with no safeties at all except the beaver tail built into the grip and I would never even consider leaving my bedroom without a chambered round. Always prepare for the worst and even the worst will not be so bad….

  • Richmancan2003

    Absolutely agree on all points-I mostly carry a S&W 1-7/8″ 638 Airweight Bodyguard these days but it IWB and dang that can be quick. But if I decide to carry such as my Springfield GI .45 or XD 9mm there will be a round in the chamber and the .45 will be cocked and locked in a proper holster such as my greatly missed Browning Hi-Power MkIII. And it will be checked for readiness whenever worn and practiced with enough for much more than familiarity.

  • Plumberdudefixit

    I carry loaded-and-cocked! I know it’s not as safe, so I take extra precautions. Going into some rough neighborhoods, like I do, I need every edge. I don’t like open carry either. If they know you’re carrying they can change their tactics.

  • Yaakov Ben Avaraham

    I carry a Glock 17 as my primary carry and you can bet there is a round in the chamber. My wife also has a Glock a 26 and she won’t carry with a round in the chamber she says there is no safety. I have tried to explain the Glock’s safties to both her nad my daughter who will soon be carrying a Glock 17, yet niether one will listen. I’ve run the 21 second drill and they still don’t get it. Any way I am in agreement with you, there’ll ony be seconds to denfend andcocked lock and ready to go is the way.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Hepper27 Robert Davis

    It is just as easy to not have the M1911 cocked as it is to drop the safety.I carry without the safety on with a load in the chamber. The art is in the draw. But the hammer down.With one motion on the removal of the weapon from the holster the firearm is Cocked and ready to fire He is half right and half wrong.

    • Stoney

      What you describe, one in the chamber and hammer down is condition 2 and is more dangerous than condition one.  If you drop your gun with the hammer down and one in the chamber, the safety cannot be on, and if it hits wrong, the gun will go off.  While if I have mine cocked and locked, it will not go off if dropped, even directly on the hammer (if nothing inside the gun, like the sear, is worn out or broken before it’s dropped). 

      Condition 1, cocked and locked or condition 3, no round in the chamber, are, despite appearances, the two safest means of carry.  Condition 2 is the least safe., and condition 3 is the slowest…  So Cocked and Locked it the right way to carry… for right handers, as the thumb safety is protected by the back of the holster (presuming you have a good one). 

      With someone carrying on the left side, or these stupid new trend of ambidextrous thumb safety makes it more dangerous.  Especially for IWB… there should never be a safety on a 1911 that is exposed and not protected by the holster, as it can get bumped off safe without the carrier’s knowledge.  Make sense?

  • Bchahanovich

    Obama has shown us the everyone is entitled to their own opinion no matter how misinformed or misguided…. I wish they would be an idiot on their own time….

  • Bchahanovich

     Just to clarify…. My 1911 is cocked and locked, the only way to rock. My BUG is a snub .357 revolver in the small of my back, Fully loaded!

  • Anonymous

    Maybe off topic, but aren’t there states where one in the chamber is illegal?

  • Rjt_ccw

    My suggestion would be to have the person buy a semi-auto that has a decocker. This way they can carry with one in the chamber, hammer down, safety on, and with double-action trigger pull for the first shot.

  • Shermris

    I’d just tell him he can carry his weapon without a round in the chamber if that’s what he wants to do.  It’s not manditory to carry a weapon, it’s not manditory to have it loaded, and it’s not manditory to ues it.  I would advise the rest of the class to carry with a round in the chamber, or carry a weapon they feel comfortable carrying in the ready position

  • Anonymous

    I carry always one in the chamber.  My SIG Pro 2022 has no safety, as neither do most of the SIG Sauer handguns.  The trigger pull is the safety.  There is a firing pin disconnector on the action that prevents the firing pin from going forward unless the trigger is pulled all the way to the rear.  What safety has a revolver?

  • carry_all

    I carry a Millennium Pro PT111 9mm, and like many autos, it has a striker instead of a hammer.  With that said, it is in cock mode all the time, the striker is under pressure ready to be release, i.e. cocked (yes it has internal fire pin block) and an external safety.
    With that said, a 1911 is actually safer to carry cocked and lock, it not only has a lever safety, but a grip safety as well.  Most people carrying don’t even know their handgun is in single action mode with striker under pressure.

  • Cnsay

    I carry my 1911 cocked and locked. He probably wouldn’t like when I carry my Bodyguard 380, round chambered and the safety OFF. No ambi safety and impossible to turn off with the left hand, has about 6LB trigger pull and no finger on the trigger, that is safety enough.

  • Cerberus

    A sharp sword is more ‘dangerous’ than a dull one.  And it’s supposed to be.  I prefer my Glock in part because there are no encumbrances to its firing should I need to.  The only ‘safety’ that much matters is the one between your ears.  Keep it in your holster until you need it, don’t point it at anything you aren’t willing to fire on, and don’t pull the trigger unless you mean it.  Sorry if that sounds simplistic.

  • Iamableaver

    Carrying a 1911 cocked and locked has never resulted in ANY problems for me.  An associate amny years ago stuffed his 1911 into the small of his back, round chambered, hammer down – slid into a curved booth at a diner.  Scooting across the booth caused the slide to pull back, slammed back into battery and shot a through and through hole in his buttock.  Cocked and locked is a lot better.

  • Lessary

    This is the same thing as carrying a revolver with an empty chamber on the left side of the wheel. What is the point? Pull the trigger and tell the bad guy you mean business next time so he or she better not do it again. I hope the bad guy will remember this as they bury you.

  • Deadontarget

    I would have to agree 100% with you. Just to add another reason to carry with a round in the chamber. What happens if you go hands on with the bad guy and can only muster your strong hand free to get your gun? if you had a round already in the chamber – game over for the bad guy. You wouldn’t be able to rack a round unless you were highly skilled and practiced a whole lot racking with one hand.
    My experience with those who do not carry with one already in the chamber are those who are not completely comfortable carry concealed in the first place. Let’s face it. It’s a tremendous responsibility to carry a gun, and to carry one concealed – even more. If you are not comfortable carrying a gun already cocked and locked, as with a 1911, then maybe you should not be carrying a gun concealed in the first place. Carry mace or something similar instead.
    By the way, the 1911 cocked and locked is very safe when it’s safeties are engaged. It won’t fire unless the grip safety is depressed, and the slide safety is released. It’s actually a safer gun than a glock or other semi without the additional safeties. Maybe even safer than a revolver. Just my 2 cents.
    Dave

  • Charsmare

    My husband has me carry my glock without a round chambered & that is my “safety”.  It always made sense to me until this article.  I carry it in my purse.  Thoughts?

    • Ldgrey1963

      I am not a fan of the Glock for the reason of no external safety, however, I have seen people who have modified glocks with external safetys (Glocks are fine weapons I just like the 1911 style safety). I have been looking at the RUGER SR9C for conceal carry, BTW I am NO fan of ‘off body’ carry (IE PURSE) if the BG commendeers your hand bag there goes your only chance to bear your firearm against the BG. I am sure your husband would consider you getting a quality conceal inside the waistband or similar ‘on body’ carry method. I often use the THUNDERWEAR deep concealment holster, you might want to look at that type of holster. Whatever weapon you carry it should be ready to go bang, I hope your purse has a internal compartment for the glock, if your glock lives with other items in the bag, something could become lodged in the trigger and it could possible go bang. But if you happen to need the Glock to go bang, chances are you will NOT have the time to react to rack the slide, Just my 2 cents.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_H5J6U2OIXVCRGKMY4DLVE45KPQ AriKona

      @Charsmare – If carrying in a purse versus a holster, you might consider what I use (as I posted previously) and that is a Saf-T-Bloc which fits behind the trigger which allows you to have chambered a round without the chance that something in your purse might get into the trigger guard and cause a discharge.  I have nothing to do with the company that manufactures these things, but they make a Glock safe even when it normally might not be.  As you draw your firearm out, you tap the block out (in a microsecond) and you are ready to fire.  You might as well check it out as it would save you a lot of time having to chamber a round if you were in a life threatening situation, which would not usually give you the time to do so.

      • Anonymous

        hopefully nothing in ur purse knocks it out!!!!!!!! You have to keep that in mind too!

    • Rudej

      unless your purse is atached to your body –you are in violation of a lot of laws–and will be arested in a lot of states

  • Fowlmood2

    I carry my Sig Sauer 1911 C “Locked and Cocked” at all times.

  • Robobward

    I mostly agree with several of these comments but you really need to know your gun first and formost, I carry the 1911A1 locked and loaded but not cocked, no it’s not a saftey issue the 1911 actually has 4 safeties built into it, the reason you don’t want to carry with the hammer cocked is because over time you have the possibility of weakening the main spring which can cause a mis-fire. If you don’t feel comfortable with a round in the chamber you need to take more time to learn your gun, it is totally safe if you use the safeties 1) 1911′s wont fire unlees the grip safety is engaged 2) use the thumb safety and practice  thumbing it on and off 3) use the half cock saftey it puts less tension on the main spring and again practice  thumbing the hammer to fully cocked. the last safety is really for experts only you can modify your holster so as to hold your slide in a slightly pushed back possition this will cause the  the disconecter to be engaged this also keeps from accidental firing until you draw it from the holster. you can use one or all of the safeties or a combination of the to keep it safe and ready to fire, Be safe Be smart and don’t let the bad guy win

    • Stoney

      Could explain to everyone how you carry it locked (Thumb Safety on) with the trigger down?  Since the Thumb Safety won’t engage unless the weapon is cocked?  Did you modify your weapon or are you carrying something other than a true 1911?

    • Anonymous

      Nonsense.  That’s not the way springs work.  Springs fail after constant cycling, not because they’ve been compressed.  I was the armorer for an MP company back when MPs carried M1911A1s.  Every single one of our M1911A1s had been built before 1946.  All had been well-used, and many were carried locked-and-cocked every day by officers and NCOs working our law enforcement mission.  In all that time, I never encountered a single pistol where the hammer was “weakened”—not once.  Never heard of it happening—not once.  Never saw a mention of such a problem in armorers’ pubs or manuals—not once.  Never heard of it happening out in the civilian world—not once.  And I was shooting a fair bit of IPSC back then, in the days when everyone knew the only pistol for IPSC was an M1911 in a major caliber like .45ACP.  In short, there is no such problem.

      As for using the half-cock?  THE HALF-COCK IS NOT A SAFETY.  It is there to (hopefully) catch the hammer if it slips while being thumb-cocked.  No reputable competent trainer would ever approve of using the half-cock as a “safe” position.  Using the half-cock as a “safety” will get you thrown off any range, military or civilian, for grossly unsafe behavior and demonstrated lack of familiarity with your firearm.

  • Anonymous

    Good article,

    I currently carry a Springfield XDm 9mm with a round chambered and feel completely comfortable with it.  I would, however, like to know what the thoughts are about carrying while riding a motorcycle.  I think I wouldn’t have a problem with carrying the Springfield with a round chambered, but what about a 1911.  Is cocked-and-locked a bad idea?  I have never carried a 1911 and wonder about the potential for an AD in the unfortunate event of a high-speed “dismount.”  Can the hammer of a 1911 fall due to a external blunt force?

  • Anonymous

    This guy should be carrying a revolver, if at all.

  • Jeff no last name

    I have carried C&L both as a uniformed police officer and in an ISW holster for years without any problems. I hear this kind of talk from folks who are not familiar or at ease with their firearm or carry methods.  The only operational concern I have ever heard about not carrying rounds chambered were for Mosad covert operatives in arab countries – an AD would cost you your life, they also train to draw, cock (chamber a round) and fire in less than 1 sec as SOP so it works for them.

    • Stoney

      What you describe for Masad operatives is true for all Israeli Military… in fact, it’s called the Israeli Carry, and it came about during the time shortly before Israeli Independence in May of 1948.  In those days they smuggled in all kinds of different weapons to use.  Rifles were on thing, but automatic pistols were a problem, since everyone had a different manual of arms.  Different safety, different actions (some SA, some DA, and some DA/SA.  And since a member of the Hagan-ah never knew what kind of pistol they’d get, the rule was safety’s were always and never a round in the chamber.   So any gun you picked up, you’d rack and fire.  It was slightly slower than someone who had a single gun’s manual of arms down pat, but faster than trying to figure out which weapon you had at the time (perhaps picked up on the battle field from friend for foe) and what its manual of arms is… is there a safety, which way is fire, is there a red dot for fire or not, etc.  So everyone carried in Condition Israeli… Hammer down on an empty chamber and no safety used.  The Arabs had the same problem, and I suspect maybe the same solution, but the Israeli’s got credit for it and it is therefore so named.  I have a friend over there in Anti-Terrorism (she’s a world renowned expert), I’ll have to check with her if that’s still the standard… I’m guessing not.

      Oh, by the way, every time she comes here to do a speech or conference, she reminds me how vulnerable we all are… and as for her (she’s about 5’4″ and wears a size 6 or 8, and she carries a full size cocked and locked 1911 at all times.

      I firmly believe in the 2nd Amendment and that everyone (except violent felons, the mentally incompetent, and children) should have the right to have a gun or guns of their choosing… but that doesn’t mean that I believe that everyone SHOULD have a gun.   And the dimwit (and several other dimwits who’ve made dumb comments) is a great case in point.  He should be using the stick up his butt for self defense…

  • John

    I carry a Sig 220, with one in the chamber.  The first shot is double action, and I like that.  I wouldn’t mind carrying a 1911 C&L, as that is what I shoot in competition.  I’m used to it.  I don’t like the Glock for carry; I’m just not comfortable with the trigger.  If the dude wants to carry suicidally, don’t argue with him. 

  • Sungloblu

    Draw, aim and fire!  I don’t care what kind of a handgun you prefer. There semi-autos that will do that as well as revolvers and they’re perfectly safe.  I own an auto that will not set on safe with the hammer back.  With a round in the chamber the safety must be released and the hammer pulled or a  full trigger pull is required on the first round.  It’s fine for target practice.   I’ll never use it for concealed carry.  My primary carry weapons are pin-fired semi-auto and a five shot revolver.

  • Eale35013

    Hey when is Illinois getting theirs?

  • Trose49

    Always Carry Cocked and Locked!

  • Gnomore21

    Keep your booger hook off the bang switch and the gun will not fire.

  • 2112

    I carry a Glock +1 always. Thank god that all I need to do is point it and press the trigger.

  • Anonymous

    I carry a S&W s9ve with a round in the hole and have never had a problrm, and it is just as good as a glock.  I wuld rather have a 1911 but with the prices who can afford one.  Like wise an M1 Garand.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Fish669 James Fisher

    Springfield XD9 Old Style , My Main CCW (with one in the tube)

  • Brockbenroth

    I showed my friend my new carry gun the other day. When I handed it to him I told him it was loaded. He dropped the mag and racked the slide and said “you know you had one in the chamber, don’t you?”. My response was “DUH, if I have to get it out I don’t want to have to rack the slide first”. He replied “it only takes a second”. So I explained to him that in the second he was racking the slide I would have two rounds off.

  • Rodt Shelton

    I carry my glock with a round in the chamber and in my wast band without a holster. if I carry a 1911 its a round in the chamber and safety on. but I know some people that carry their 1911 with a round in the chamber and the safety off. yes I said off. they say the grip safety keeps the hammer safe till in your hand. if you carry a glock in a prus, ist ok to have a round in the chamber as long as its in a pocket by itself. you dont want your lipstick to press the trigger.thats what makes it go bang..

  • Jerry_smith

    This topic comes up every now and then. Let me say that every pistol, revolver or automatic that I carry and a saftey built in the weapon so that it can be carries with a round chambered. Just read the instruction manual. I too carry a 1911 and it is cocked and locked, my Glocks have great safeties built in. My L Frame also safety in it’s construction. I have 357 J Frame that I carry mostly and I feel it is as safe as if I am carrying this with one chamber emplty.

    So there should never be a problem.

  • Endndoc

    Always keep one round in the ready! Learned that in the Navy/Marine!! DESERT STORM!!!

  • http://concealed-carry-virginia.com Will

    I would argue that you should just carry a revolver. That is what I recommend to my student, I was even (dating myself here) expert qualified with the 1911 as an MP in a different life… For pure personal protection (outside a war zone) a revolver is your best bet… I’m just sayin’….

  • Tinmannx

    Loaded and locked, yes, cocked no.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_ESJHPLANPWAZPREXL324Z7DUL4 markie

    Great article! I love the matter of fact presentation. So often these type of opinions become a match over who is right instead of what is right.  Thank You Sir!

  • Wizard Holloway

    ok am hearing alot of different things here. I agree with everyone who says training and practice, being military i know that they both work. However, for someone like myself, who lives in a state, and town that open carry is not frowned upon, concealed carry in any form is still confusing. without getting into which weapon is better can somone explain what they mean by cocked and locked, while carrying concealed, because I think it has a whole different meaning then what I know as cocked and locked.

  • MrJohnSir5722

    What all of the posts here point out is basic opinion.  Someone who would not carry “cocked and locked” is either not comfortable with their firearm or not comfortable carrying concealed.  I’ve had to get past both of those.  The fact of the matter is that a violent attack happens so quickly that if you haven’t spent the time drilling the various skill drills to the point of the presentation of and use of the gun you plan to use being instinctive, then you haven’t prepared for the worst case senario.  That’s what concealed carry is really about – training for the worst and hoping for the best case senario.  I have carried 1911s cocked and locked and feel very good about the safety aspects of carrying that way.  I now carry a SA XD 45 compact and I’m just as comfortable with it.  I actually draw faster and shoot as accurately with the XD than I did with my 1911s.  Training is the key and getting involved with IDPA helped me work through some serious handling problems like muzzle discipline, trigger finger awareness and quick acquition of the target, both standing still and on the move.  I owe allot of my improvements to the range safety officers who were willing to point out my errors.

  • Ben

    If its not dangerous, what good is it?

  • Tim

    The reason to not carry cocked an locked is because the safety could be accidentally tripped and you fire a round down your pant leg – a far far much more likely occurrence than being in a split second gun battle. Learn to draw and rack the slide just like the Israelis do. Don’t be a dumb shit like this instructor – sending people off to injure themselves.

    • Anonymous

      If you’re not competent enough to carry a locked-and-cocked M1911, you’re certainly not competent enough to be passing judgement on anyone being a “dumb shit.”

  • Mjroho

    Great article! I’m gonna say that most of us who carry were probably a little bit concerned the first time we carried with one in the chamber. At least I was. Training, practice and confidence will help you overcome your worry of carrying “cocked & locked”. Hopefully none of us will ever have to draw our weapon to defend ourselves. I carry a Glock with one in the chamber. I feel much safer, knowing all I have to do is draw, point & squeeze the trigger. Just a thought…..how many thugs are gonna have to rack the slide before THEY pull the trigger?………….. Think about it!

  • Martialmaster89

    It took me forever to explain this to my dad, if you fear the gun you shouldn’t be carrying it. I carried a Ruger p90 before I got my Kimber 1911, no safety at all. Nothing ever happened.

    Oh well, I eventually got through to him. 

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_L6SYW47LXT2SNDJF6LP2ZU3CFQ hercules unchained

    Some like the 1911 45cal.
    I myself carry S&W 39, double action, that I bought 30 years ago.
    I was in the Army for 12 years, basic weapon, 1911 45 cal.
    I was never very good with it.
    My 9 mm , I can handle.
    Loaded , pull trigger.

  • Anonymous

    Dropping a 1911 .45 nose first on concrete can cause it to fire. I can happen.

    I’d prefer to go with a double action, modern automatic. The 1911 in a military antique, albeit an effective antique at threat distances. It was never designed to carry concealed. They were issued mainly to officers, and they had a holster.

    • Ldgrey1963

      Thats funny, I carry a fine specimen of a COLT Lightweight Commander and I feel confident engaging a threat it the threat presents itself beyond 7-15 yds. As far as being a antique, the 1911 is the most copied/cloned firearm in the last 100 years, I guess some people just feel like the 1911 will serve them for the foreseeable future. I wish I could say the same for Glock. I will never trust a Glock again for my protection.

  • Tmtmtl

    This is why I carry a Glock when I carry. I live on a military base and cannot carry on post. But when I do carry it’s loaded with a round chambered.

  • Stoney

    CovertJohn, that last post was tooooo tempting to respond to… 

    I’ll just leave it with…  Carrying a 1911 without carrying Cocked and Locked is a lot like a cock and bull story, if your not cocked and locked, you’re likely to get the horn!
    Stoney

  • Anonymous

    I started off carrying my Ruger SR9 in my waistband without a load chambered but after thinking how much valuable time it takes to take the safety off and chamber a round that I started carrying with a chambered round and the weapon on safety. Your correct, every seconds counts when your faced with someone who already has his gun loaded and looking to do you harm.

  • Anonymous

    Just subscibed to USA Carry and I know this has been covered before BUT which holster?
    I have been wearing a Yagi Slip but the puppy got to it and it is like in Holster Heaven.  Been carring a Colt 38 Super auto Commander on a lt-weight frame.  My full size 45 ACP is a heavy weight.
    California CCW allowes me 2 weapones on my certificate.  So, pocket 32 Colt 1903 is alt carry.
    But “Which holster for Calif Hot Weather?”  And for carry getting in and out of Automobiles?  Cross draw? 

  • Anonymous

    In addition to carrying my 1911 locked and loaded, I practice with it long and often.  That reduces the possibility of the so-called “lucky shot”.  The more I practice, the luckier I get.
    Ray

  • Northmike108

    Never want my 1911 to go click when the the hammer drops.always someone that dosent understand how the weapon works 

  • Tom Silva

    OPen carry is still better than no carry at al. l Most people I teach dont like the ergonmics of the clocks, especially the ladies,  they do like the light weight but don’t like the recoil and the fast moving slide, nor do they like the way the glocks “fit” or don’t fit and their smaller hands, I suggest a S&W 649 with at least one speed loaer in stantly availablewhen loaded eith .38 Spl +ps it is stiil milder recoil than the 357.  Advangtage: the gun is loaded round in chamber Aims well shoots well is as reliable as Sun Rise;. and whith the shrouded hammer, no snags, . no drags fom pocket or pursse., plus . no worry about the magazine catch being accidenly puhed. by collision with other esential purse items. and with proper training cocking on draw provide for a 3lb trigger pul in single action mode thus assisting more accurate first shot placement. Any man who cannot hit what he want where he wants with a 1911 needs more training or he should carry a police officer where ever he goes.

  • Tom Silva

    OPen carry is still better than no carry at al. l Most people I teach dont like the ergonmics of the clocks, especially the ladies,  they do like the light weight but don’t like the recoil and the fast moving slide, nor do they like the way the glocks “fit” or don’t fit and their smaller hands, I suggest a S&W 649 with at least one speed loaer in stantly availablewhen loaded eith .38 Spl +ps it is stiil milder recoil than the 357.  Advangtage: the gun is loaded round in chamber Aims well shoots well is as reliable as Sun Rise;. and whith the shrouded hammer, no snags, . no drags fom pocket or pursse., plus . no worry about the magazine catch being accidenly puhed. by collision with other esential purse items. and with proper training cocking on draw provide for a 3lb trigger pul in single action mode thus assisting more accurate first shot placement. Any man who cannot hit what he want where he wants with a 1911 needs more training or he should carry a police officer where ever he goes.

  • Rob V

    I carry a 1911.  I keep a round chambered, but don’t have it cocked & locked.  I’m not against having it locked and cocked though.  Depending on what area I’m in determines it.  If you’re going to carry, then locked and cocked, in my opinion, is the best way to go.  You’re 100% correct,,, in a flash, you may need to draw and fire.  Taking the time to chamber could cost you or your family thier lives.  I just don’t feel comfortable having it locked and cocked.  I’ve been around firearms since 1985 when I went into the Marines.  I’m very familiar with firearms, support the 2nd Ammendment and Concealed Carry.  I just prefer not to have it locked and cocked.  As for the “know it all guys”, they’re usually idiots that have self-esteem issues and always have to be heard.  These are the types, in my opinion, that can give CCW a bad name.  I’ve met people like you’re talking about, and the first thing they want to do in public is talk about what they are carrying, not stopping to think that there could be a thug within close proximity that could hear the coversation and want to start trouble, or spooks a a family that is not against CCW, but chooses not to exercise their right.  If you carry concealed, remember the 3 S’s.  Safe, smart, silent. 

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_H5RMP2XLUR2TSIKYN3SN26NDHI Cobra

    A good article on an aged old question.   Your points are valid and I can find no fault with them.   I routinely carry my Kimber Ultra Elite .45 now that I’m retired after nearly 30 years of being a law enforcement officer.   I have no problem with cocked and locked.   I also often have a Kahr .380 D/A only with no safety at all and I carry that with a round in the chamber!

    As you say it all comes down to training, skill and what one is comfortable with I guess.   If others prefer a slightly slower method of carry that they are more comfortable with then I have no problem with that as well.   So long as they realize they are sacrificing a split second.   A seemingly short flash of time that may or may not work out.   The choice and decision has to be an individual one.   If you’re not comfortable with something, then all the recommendations in the world won’t matter.

    At the end of the day, I think it’s best to at least have a firearm WITH you than none at all!   I’m a retired officer now but I can say with 100% assurance . . . A gun of ANY kind in your hand is worth more than a cop on the phone!

  • WOP2

    Why would you even entertain an argument with a close minded individual like this? There are two ways a 1911 should be handled. One, for defense carry, is cocked an locked. The other is no ammo source (mag removed), and a clear chamber, and a lot of 1911 parts on your cleaning bench. Seems pretty simple to me.

  • dman78

    I have a SW99 with the anti-stress button (Decocker), no safety. I always have a round in the chamber and decocked, even when I was issued a 9mm berretta, I had a round in the chamber, decocked and safety off.  even though I have a little more the several pounds of trigger pull the first round, it gives me the ability to sight my target as I squeeze a round off…

  • Lafaillepj

    I am disabled and walk with a cane, so if my 40 is not cocked and locked what do I do ask the criminal if he would mind holding my cane while I camber around. It should never take more than one hand to draw, flip the safety off and aim and fire. Plus in close up encounters (which most are) you will need the second hand to hold off the criminal while the other hand draws the weapon. If you are not going to carry cocked and locked you might as well leave it in the glove box.

  • http://www.facebook.com/pj.lafaille Pj LaFaille

    I am disabled and walk with a cane, so if my 40 is not cocked and locked what do I do ask the criminal if he would mind holding my cane while I camber a round. It should never take more than one hand to draw, flip the safety off and aim and fire. Plus in close up encounters (which most are) you will need the second hand to hold off the criminal while the other hand draws the weapon. If you are not going to carry cocked and locked you might as well leave it in the glove box.

  • Joker

    I bet he is the same guy that carries 5 round in his wheel gun as well, you know you have to have a empty cylinder under the hammer, just in case you drop it off a 10 story building and lands right on the hammer……..Not!

  • Djkoncel

    I carry a small 45 cal Kimber.  I am 100% confident in the grip safety, cocked & locked is the only way to be truly ready to meet a life threat in a split second.  Concealed Carry is still very  new in Wisconsin.  I have had many folks in utter disbelief that anyone would or could carry a loaded weapon AND when told we carry not only loaded, but “cocked & locked,” they’re appalled!  We’ve spent so much time teaching safety, from a hunting standpoint, we need to educate a new mindset, that of self-defense.  Our world is changing, unfortunately even in small, otherwise thought to be safe communities, violent crimes do exist and denial will not make it go away.  We must also educate the proper circumstances to use such deadly force, so that crimes are not compounded with additional tragedies and consequences.  In a state so rich in hunting sports, I never anticipated the uneasiness over concealed carriers from the public.  Education & Patience with people are the keys I believe.

  • Spodeodeo93

    …..why even carry…period…I live in Miami where you have high rise apartment living and parking can be a long walk at night where predators just wait in the darkness for an easy grab and most are armed and most of the time the weapon is already pointed at you…so now either leave the firearm home and use a water pistol or cock and lock and save your life…!!!.

  • Polkcityjack

    carrying a gun without a chambered round is about the same as not carrying a gun.  my carry is chambered at all times, but my carry has a trigger safety

  • Thmpr81

    Only a fool or an idiot would carry a 1911 as a concealed carry, you might as well be carrying a 50 cal DE. foolish.

    • Ldgrey1963

      I CC a fullsize 1911 Para P-14/Colt series 80 with 15 rounds + 1 in the chamber in a open top Galco pancake holster with an extra 15 rnd magazine. I am neither foolish or an idiot. I am curious, what do you ‘say’ is the wise choice for CC?

    • StoneyFF

       Perhaps you should try something before speaking ill of it… and with such rude language.  Not all 1911′s are full size, and not all are all steel, and you, sir, have no idea what you are talking about… though it doesn’t seem to stop you.  Ignorance is a lack of knowledge, and in this case, your ignorance is showing.

      Stoney

  • Aaronorgill

    Lol.. Sorry dude but I strongly agree with the guy your arguing against. That’s why almost all arms dealers I encountered on my pursuit of a concealed carry gun.. All have said NOT to go with a Sao pistol. I hope I don’t get an instructor like you

    • StoneyFF

       Clearly you aren’t listening to what I’m saying.  Your friend is rude and wrong when he says that ‘only a fool or idiot would carry a 1911 for CC’ (not an exact quote but close)…  I never said, nor am I saying now that the 1911 is for everyone for CC, or even most. 

      There are a plethora of choices out there for people to choose from for their CC weapon and anyone who makes a statement such as your friend made is ignorant, that is to say uninformed (or alternatively very poorly informed).

      Plaxico Burress was carrying a DOA when he shot himself in the leg in the Night Club where he was illegally carrying the weapon.  My 1911 is a bit larger, but with the right holster and cover garment and carried IWB is more comfortable and concealable and clearly safer being carried cocked and locked than Burress was carrying his DOA with no safety other than the trigger safety.

      And if you make your choices on weapons based on the guy behind the counter (all of whom are prejudiced toward what they like or dislike, and most relatively ignorant (ignorance being a lack of or very limited knowledge on a subject) themselves, and I speak from experience… back in the day when I was behind that counter, I didn’t know 1/10th of what I know now, and I, like all other honest, open minded people, know I have a lot left to learn… I’m constantly learning)…

      The only intelligent thing you said in your message ‘dude’ is referring to getting an instructor… since you clearly need one… and I hope the one you get isn’t as narrow minded as you and your friends and gun counter know-it-alls.  A good instructor gives you the information (good and bad) about ALL your choices, so you can make an intelligent and informed decision as to what is right for you.

      But that only works with people who have open minds… try opening yours.

      Stoney
      {neither idiot nor fool, nor know-it-all… but always learning because of an open mind}

  • Holger

    To be honest, that sounds to me like someone watched too many John Wayne movies. I cannot really think of a situation where “draw fast and shoot without threatening” really applies. Usually, violent situations either build up (You see someone is in trouble, someone breaks into a home, someone follows you in a dark alley) and you have ample time to cock your weapon, or someone has already his gun pointed at you or his knife on your throat, in which case only the dumbest fool would draw a weapon, cocked or not. Even in the “draw faster than the evil man” case, most people would not just shoot someone without even trying to threaten the person first, and that works with an uncocked weapon too. I am not from the US, but killing someone just like that might be illegal there, too.

    For me, the threat of an accidental discharge outweighs the “Wild West” Benefits any day.

  • Slash

    I am trying to find out if it is legal in my state to carry with one in the camber where would I go to find out??

  • Robert

    1911′s are old technology, i know that they fire well i have owned tons of them. But they have got to be the most likely firearm to be accidentally discharged. Get a glock, or a sig or something else that is a double action gun, carry one in the chamber. This solves all issues.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bob-Coco/100000387214109 Bob Coco

    Recently an off duty cop’s gun went off and killed a woman who hugged him at a bar. I’d like to know what model gun that was, cause cocked and locked killed her in that case. Don’t know if safety was off or how he was carrying, but it would be educational to know.

  • Jp

    Lol that dudes a douche and shouldn’t be allowed a ccw permit. Hold on mr criminal, I have to rack my slide after you shot my left arm. You should be able to engage one handed bc you could be occupied with your other arm. Kinda like the lady who shot her violent ex husband while holding her new born baby.

  • trollmonger

    if its life or death, that means the person has a gun, correct? so assuming it is a gun, you would only have nanoseconds to react. Wouldn’t the bad guy see you draw your weapon and shoot you faster than you could draw? not everyone is a quick draw Mcgraw. a real Tennessean knows that you take cover to gain visual and projectile shielding. when in cover pull out your weapon always keep your hand hidden, surprise is key.

  • Say Mwah

    Dumb. Just plain dumb. Nobody talks about the time it takes to fumble off the manual safety. All of these idiots ignore the fact that the M1911 Auto is SINGLE ACTION ! Browning designed a useful combat weapon, but the Germans and Czechs were smarter: They designed double-action autos…and, you morons, hear this: BOTH TYPES REQUIRE PULLING THE TRIGGER !!!! What’s quicker? Fumbling the safety or pulling the trigger???

  • Bobby

    As I’m reading these comments I am realizing that most of these people don’t really know shit about these guns 1911 first off is designed for quick draw hammer safety trigger safety grip safety if you have accidental discharge of this weapon you just not need to own a weapon at all

  • MrShane

    Anyone who thinks carrying a 1911 in anything but condition one does not understand basic laws of physics. Have fun carrying in 2 or 3, ya dingus.