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The East Coast Storm and 72-hour kits

The East Coast Storm and 72-hour kits

The East Coast Storm and 72-hour kits

Last week I wrote about the checklist I use to escape my house in an emergency in less than five minutes. One of the items on my checklist to grab was my 72-hour kits. I ended up getting several emails from people wanting to know the contents of my kit and where I get it.

With the storm raging on the East Coast at this very moment, these questions are especially timely, so I’m going to show you exactly what is in my kit.

Years ago, I used to build my own kits… I even ended up buying a bunch of products in bulk and making kits for other people. However, in the end it took way too much time, so I no longer do that.

What I do now is get my kits from a friend who builds them (actually, he builds good kits so that’s how he became my friend.) I buy his kit and then add a few items like a gun and at least 50 rounds of 9mm ammunition.

Before I show you the contents of the kit, remember, a 72-hour kit is a very simple and inexpensive form of insurance. Plus, if you have your kits and are prepared, you won’t be one of the families on the East Coast who are freaking out right now because they don’t have any food in their cupboards.

Here are the contents of the kit I buy, then as I mentioned above, I add a few other items:

6 Food Bars – The bars are 400 calories each. They come wrapped in waterproof packaging.

6 boxes of Aqua Blox – Enough water to last three days. The emergency drinking water is Coast Guard approved and has a 5-year shelf life.

Water Purification Tablets – 10 purification tablets are included in the kit. The 10 tablets will purify as many as 5 two-liter bottles of water.

AM/FM Radio – The radio comes with batteries and headphones and allows you to monitor the weather and other radio stations in the event of an emergency.

LED Flashlight – The flashlight is rechargeable and will never run out of power. To recharge it you simply squeeze the handle, which generates more power.

30-Hour Survival Candle – Comes with an adjustable wick and can also be used as a small camp stove to heat food.

5-in-1 Emergency Survival Whistle – In addition to the whistle, it includes a signal mirror, compass, waterproof match container, and flint for starting fires.

Waterproof Matches – Box of waterproof matches in case your gear gets wet during an emergency.

Emergency Sleeping Bag – The bag is waterproof and windproof and retains 90% of your body heat.

Emergency Poncho – The poncho includes a hood to protect your entire body from the elements.

Survival Knife – The knife contains 16 different tools, including a Phillips screw driver, can opener, cork screw, reamer, manicure blade, sturdy reamer, hook disgorger, slot screw driver, key ring, toothpick, fish scaler, tweezers, wood saw, cutting blade, and cap lifter.

Respirator Dust Mask – Thicker than the average dust mask and approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

Pocket Tissues – Three packs of tissues. Each pack contains 10 tissues.

Safety Goggles – To protect your eyes from debris during a disaster.

Sewing Kit – To use for sewing clothing or to repair tears in tents or other shelters. The kit includes 3 safety pins, 3 needles, 7 buttons, and 10 different colors of thread.
24-Piece Hygiene Kit – Contains a toothbrush, toothpaste, wetnaps for your hands, a bar of soap, shampoo and conditioner, dental floss pick, hand lotion, body lotion, deodorant, razor, comb, maxipads, shaving cream and a washcloth.

Small 37-Piece First Aid Kit – Contains eight spot bandages, eight sheer junior bandages, four sheer medium bandages, four sheer strips, two antibacterial, three clear strips, two fabric strips, one extra large, two alcohol pads, and two gauze pads.

Deck of Playing Cards – For entertainment.

Note Pad and Pencil – For writing down important information during an emergency.

Now, use this list to build your own kit, and don’t forget to add ammunition, at the very least.

Photo by NASA Goddard Photo and Video

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  • johndoe

    what do you pack all this stuff in?

    • thisiswhoweare

      I was wondering about that too.

    • Rob

      All of that will easily fit into a medium size duffel or day pack.

  • wfodys

    Can you say who you buy the kit from, if we want to buy one instead of making ourselves?

  • CCOR

    I’d say to be more specific on the note taking gear get Rite-in-the-Rain pen and pad. Works wonders and is water resistant

  • flyfish2

    Plus-wire,nylon cord,small file,tube of anti-biotic,ace bandage and a small pot for heating water or cooking. I hope you also carry a dependable pocket knife.

  • Mr poop

    Dont forget your gun and a few spare magazines.

  • Blogengeezer

    Great plan. Leave early and stay far from Official armed ‘Enforcers’, TSA mentality who will disarm you immediately. ‘Katrina’ example, where the shots were fired from ‘Enforcers’, who killed innocent people.

  • Cojo

    Good article. Timely info. Thanks.

    Off the top of my head add bandanas, at least several, for multi use, in different colors.
    Very important as wipes, tourniquet, slings for injured limbs, can be used to tie off or tie down objects, pre-filtering muddy water, head covering, many other uses.
    Also at least 50 – 100 feet of quarter inch nylon line.

    A few sticks of fatwood or similar dry firestarting tinder and a couple of small disposable butane lighters in addition to or in lieu of the matches.

    GLTA

  • Lame List

    Geez. You’d never last 72 hrs anywhere, especially in New York.

  • porcupine73

    Hm good article, I need to get a few of these put together. How many of these ideally should we have? I was thinking with one in the car that could cover me for both home and work? Or should there really be one in the office, in the house, and another in the car?

    How about duct tape? Would a roll of that be handy in the bag? I think instead of a sewing kit I will just get some good heavy duty black thread and needles. I don’t really need 10 different colors of thread in an emergency.

    I’m wondering about those squeeze handle flashlights. Rechargeable batteries go south after many years. If this is a 72 hour bag, it seems to me maybe have two small good LED flashlights and change the batteries every year or two. With good batteries I think the LED light would run 72 hours continuously without issue.

    And/or maybe those kind with the strap that mounts on your head, like a headlight. I’ve heard those are very convenient in an emergency because it leaves both hands free.