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PTSD and Concealed Carry

This is a discussion on PTSD and Concealed Carry within the Concealed Carry Discussion forums, part of the Main Category category; [QUOTE=Boatswain2PA;201340] Originally Posted by jabatam I manage my PTSD like I manage my screwed-up back; some days are better/worse than ...

  1. #11
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    [QUOTE=Boatswain2PA;201340]
    Quote Originally Posted by jabatam View Post
    I manage my PTSD like I manage my screwed-up back; some days are better/worse than others, so some days I exercise more, or rest more, or ice more, or eat more motrin. With my PTSD sometimes I exercise more, lighten my stress load, take a benzo to sleep, and then some days I can take on the world.
    Well said and spot on.

    I was curious as to what your profession was with a handle like "Boatswain." I knew it had to be something relating to the ocean because on the old ships, the "Bosun" was responsible for discipline, and by extension, the smooth running of the ship. The name "Bosun" is actually the evolved slang version of "Boatswain," much like "Indian" evolved into "Injun." I'm assuming that was your position or rank...I'm admittedly ignorant regarding the USCG

  2. #12
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    First of all, Thank you for serving. We all do appreciate your time and effort in doing this. You mentioned about your PTSD, so it sounds like as has been said, that you have some knowledge on the inner workings of how it operates. However, it does affect each person differently. Tho, from my experience, that one thing most PTSD people have in common with their treatment is setting a routine.

    When you find that the routine gets broken, then we panic or the " oh, sh** " . If you are not already in treatment for your PTSD, please look up your closest VA for assistance. Your first step is admitting to yourself that their are issues.

    As for leaving your weapon, I think now that you have had that scare, you will be more aware and add it to your routine to check and double check every time you take it off away from home. It's all a learning experience and it some cases a relearning experience or changing routines.

    If you are like me, I do not like changes any more as it is hard to make the new adjustments, even minor ones. But keep at it. You will prevail. Good luck to you. :)

  3. #13
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    I have dealt with ADHD my entire life. I too have learned to live my life by a series of routines otherwise my native scatterbrain will forget key things. In my professional life that can certainly cause problems. With respect to firearms I typically do not remove my gun from its holster. If I am required to sit I have developed a technique where I invert the wasteline of my trousers, basically rolling the wasteband inward so the butt of the pistol goes down the leg of the trousers keeping the butt of the pistol and the entire holster concealed. If you keep the waistband fastened you can keep the waistband from flipping back over with your legs. When you're done pull your pants up above the level of the stall and rearrange your carry rig. It takes some practice but once you get the technique down it works well.

    This is yet ANOTHER reason to buy a good holster.

    Also practicing a bit of situational awareness helps. Choosing the stall where the wall is on your carry side helps keep things concealed.

  4. #14
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    I feel your pain, leaving high dollar and security items in places that you dont remember, until someone hands it to you.
    It is hard to regain yourself after this, but it can be done. As service members you live through a structured life, eat, sleep, shoot and return only when directed to. No need to say it all over again, we are brothers throuhg it all.

    Strike First, always.

    19 years Active Duty, still in.

    Take care

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    I feel for u my brother. I've got 10+years active duty Marines and I've had my fair share of those moments but so far not the same one twice. Stay alert, stay vigilant and keep the BG's bleeding
    OOHRAH

  6. #16
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    A shoulder holster does not need to be removed to use the restroom. Not saying that this is the right solution for you, but that it may be an option.

  7. #17
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    Ditto on the thanks for serving. Thank ALL of you who have served. I don't have a combat related PTSD, but due to a head-on collision driver I was left with memory loss and memory problems. I know what you mean about sticking to routines. I handle the nature calls like poster number 3 above, I draw the pistol from the holster and stick it between my feet in my boxers. Hard to miss it you pull up your drawers. ;-) Whatever method you decide to use. I hope it works for you, Keep on packin.
    SINCE WHEN IS IT EXTREME TO SUPPORT THE CONSTITUTION?
    THE AMERICAN FLAG SHOULD BE ALLOWED EVERY WHERE IN THE UNITED STATES!!!!
    Stand With Arizona (and Against Illegal Immigration)

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    Quote Originally Posted by vettefreak View Post
    Airborne brother! i do have similar issues, just not quite to the extent as you. I forget a lot of stuff, but havent forgotten my pistol anywhere. What I do to ensure I dont is to put it in my pants/shorts when i take it off so I cant forget it lol
    +100 for inside the shorts...can't pull the britches back up until you reholster...works for me all the time. I've used the routine ever since I left my EDC in the stall once, but lucky enough to remember it 20 ft out the outer door. I certainly wised-up after that, like you.

    Now, more importantly, thanks a million for serving & welcome home! Myself, although a Viet Nam era coot, not a Combat Vet (how that came to be is another story of a 12-hour simple twist of fate that kept me carrying "survivor guilt" for over 35 years). I fully expected dead at 22 in a Cambodian rice paddy...strange how life works out.

    Still, I garnered a nasty case of PTSD from a number of near-death life experiences in mid-life that included a serious shooting/murder attempt event ending with an out-right hand-to-hand finish that left my assailant in a hospital very bloody & near death and me in the hospital for 3 days (now scarred from a very serious human-bite on my left hand). And YES, you are not alone in this one. I don't think any of us like talking about the crap that saddled us with these wounds that are not visible, but your courage to express your questions is commendable. The symptoms can really suck, but sometimes we really need to put it out to those that know.

    Because of the "forgetfulness", I always drop my EDC in the "shorts bucket" because I know how my short-term memory & attention is affected....'tis worked well so-far for the EDC.

    On a lighter note, but similar situation, I was on a road-trip with a friend visiting from Germany trying to find a good camp for the night along Lake Ontario in northern NYS (but nada en route, from Fort Niagra to Watertown). We did a pit stop & gassed-up at an all-night station in Rochester. The place had hot-water in the can, so I took advantage to get some road-dirt off and grab a shave at 2:00am. Fifty miles (a very tired hour later) down the road I remembered taking my eye-glasses off to take care of business but not putting them back on. I then ran the obsessively ruminating "tape" through my head that I absolutely had to go back to get them (an hour each way and 100 miles lost, just to get back to where I was...definite bummer, when all I wanted to do was find a bush to crawl under for the rest of the night!) So, I disclosed this to my companion. She said something to me, me hearing her ask me what I had said. So I repeated myself & then heard her then say very clearly, "on your face...they're on your face, you old fool"...Son of a B**ch! There they were, sitting squarely on my nose! LOL..."Scatter-brained" PTST symptoms at work.

    You are definitely not alone! that's just a bit of how this affliction works...now, just don't do it again...and laugh at you own absurdities...it's a sign sound mental health.
    "There's a reason you separate the Military and the Police. One fights the enemy of the State and the other serves and protects the People. When the Military becomes both, then the enemies of the State tend to become the People."



  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkuisi8mo View Post
    On a lighter note, but similar situation, I was on a road-trip with a friend visiting from Germany trying to find a good camp for the night along Lake Ontario in northern NYS (but nada en route, from Fort Niagra to Watertown). We did a pit stop & gassed-up at an all-night station in Rochester. The place had hot-water in the can, so I took advantage to get some road-dirt off and grab a shave at 2:00am. Fifty miles (a very tired hour later) down the road I remembered taking my eye-glasses off to take care of business but not putting them back on. I then ran the obsessively ruminating "tape" through my head that I absolutely had to go back to get them (an hour each way and 100 miles lost, just to get back to where I was...definite bummer, when all I wanted to do was find a bush to crawl under for the rest of the night!) So, I disclosed this to my companion. She said something to me, me hearing her ask me what I had said. So I repeated myself & then heard her then say very clearly, "on your face...they're on your face, you old fool"...Son of a B**ch! There they were, sitting squarely on my nose! LOL..."Scatter-brained" PTST symptoms at work.
    I have had similar experiences with various things, usually my phone, so I can relate. Thank you for sharing.

  10. #20
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    Thank you all for sharing your stories and tips. It is relieving to know that I'm not alone. Be safe out there!

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