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Inform the officer or not when concealed carry?

This is a discussion on Inform the officer or not when concealed carry? within the Concealed Carry Discussion forums, part of the Main Category category; Just to clarify, the U.S. Bill of Rights (amendments to the constitution) limit the power of the U.S. federal government. ...

  1. #1131
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    Just to clarify, the U.S. Bill of Rights (amendments to the constitution) limit the power of the U.S. federal government. It does NOT "grant" liberties, it merely recognizes God-given/natural rights.

    Greg

    Quote Originally Posted by Cord View Post
    Couldn't disagree with you more, but won't say you're wrong. I will say I think it's a HUGE leap of faith to compare all LEO to dangerous wild animals and feared apex predators. Yes, they CAN do you harm, but I don't think the vast majority would.

    As far as giving up liberties, the truth is we gave up or allow our rights to be infringed upon every day (and by rights, I mean rights granted in the Bill of Rights). 1st Amendment gives us the right to peacably assemble. Yes, you have that right, but in most places you have to apply for a permit, be granted permission by a government to use that right, have the location of your assembly approved, etc, etc, etc. I could list tons of other considerations that are direct infrigements of our rights, but that's my only point.



    AMEN! Couldn't agree with you more.

  2. #1132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cord View Post
    I don't know if I've seen a personal story of any of the "do not admit" crowd following their policy and the outcome from it.
    I've been stopped four times for speeding in Washington State. One of those times I was asked to exit the vehicle. None of those times did I inform the officer of the presence of my gun. None of those times did the officer indicate in any way shape or form that it bothered him in the least that I did not inform him of a gun that he did not know about or see, even the cop who asked me to exit the vehicle and the first indication of a gun was when he saw it in the holster on my belt. 2 of the 4 times I was released with no ticket, only a verbal warning. Seems like a pretty good track record to me.
    Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman. Amerika: a place where the serfs are afraid of the action the police may take against them for perfectly legal behavior.

  3. #1133
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    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Cord View Post
    I don't know if I've seen a personal story of any of the "do not admit" crowd following their policy and the outcome from it.
    I've been stopped four times for speeding in Washington State. One of those times I was asked to exit the vehicle. None of those times did I inform the officer of the presence of my gun. None of those times did the officer indicate in any way shape or form that it bothered him in the least that I did not inform him of a gun that he did not know about or see, even the cop who asked me to exit the vehicle and the first indication of a gun was when he saw it in the holster on my belt. 2 of the 4 times I was released with no ticket, only a verbal warning. Seems like a pretty good track record to me.
    I'm going to speculate, but if he wasn't concerned when he discovered the weapon on your belt, wouldn't it imply the outcome would have been the same if you told him beforehand?

  4. #1134
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cord View Post
    I'm going to speculate, but if he wasn't concerned when he discovered the weapon on your belt, wouldn't it imply the outcome would have been the same if you told him beforehand?
    The outcome of that stop would not have been different, probably. I did not get a ticket that time. Does that guarantee that the other 3 times I was stopped would turn out OK if I told the cop about my gun? NO. I don't want police going "Canton Ohio" on me, so it's best if they just don't know about my gun, since it has nothing to do with a traffic stop for speeding anyway.
    Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman. Amerika: a place where the serfs are afraid of the action the police may take against them for perfectly legal behavior.

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    Quote Originally Posted by festus View Post
    There are only a few that go full blown ape nuts over legal ownership and possession of a weapon. These guys are easy enough to deal with. Simply ask for a supervisor and file a formal complaint. Follow up on the complaint with internal affairs and bad cops don't last long.
    Wow. I wonder where this magical land is where bad cops don't last long, and it is "simple" to ask for a supervisor and file a complaint, and then follow up on the complaint with IA - because it sure isn't America.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thistle172 View Post
    Wow. I wonder where this magical land is where bad cops don't last long, and it is "simple" to ask for a supervisor and file a complaint, and then follow up on the complaint with IA - because it sure isn't America.
    There is a culture of turning a blind eye to indiscretions and illegal actions among law enforcement officers. There is the occasional extreme example of an officer thrown under the bus, but the amount of damage left in the path to that point is more than any private citizen would ever be allowed to do. Bad cops tend to be the rule, not the exception these days. This is not a generalization, though is more prevalent in larger municipalities, less so in smaller communities. It's all about accountability. If a small town officer gets out of line, the community shuns them. That simply doesn't happen in places like Chicago, LA or NYC. Those places tend to recruit the worst of the worst, just like the TSA. They offer legal protection for the violent aggressors and carte blanche to violate the liberties of citizens. It takes more than a few complaints before any officer is subjected to consequences of their actions, at which point another just like them will step in to their shoes. There are the odd exceptions, but that sort of position of authority doesn't tend to attract people that hold individual liberties above the authority of the state.



    When nonviolent dissent is met with excessive, violent reaction from "peacekeepers," it's no wonder the attitude is so sour toward the position. I'll consent to the rule of law, but I find less legitimacy as time goes on...
    "A man is no less a slave because he is allowed to choose a new master once in a term of years." - Lysander Spooner

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    Quote Originally Posted by sprale View Post
    Bad cops tend to be the rule, not the exception these days. This is not a generalization, though is more prevalent in larger municipalities, less so in smaller communities.
    Are you basing your statement on personal experience, or what you have read on the internet and seen on TV? Would a more accurate statement be that stories about bad cops on the internet and TV tend to be the rule, not the exception these days? I've had interactions with probably 30 law enforcement officers over the years. Only 1 has been bad.

    Ooops... I do see this was posted in a thread about informing the officer or not when concealed carrying. So... I must qualify my answer with I've had interactions with probably 30 law enforcement officers over the years, but I never mentioned my CPL or my handgun.
    Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman. Amerika: a place where the serfs are afraid of the action the police may take against them for perfectly legal behavior.

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    As far as people skills are concerned, it is best to get the police officer to enter a more "relaxed" zone than what he is in when he approaches the vehicle of someone he doesn't know. However, I certainly haven't met him either and don't know what he's up to as well. To keep the officer more at ease, I actually turn the car off put the keys on the dash and keep my hands at the top of the steering wheel before he arrives. I've just told him through action, I'm not a flight risk, I'm not going to give you a hassle. If I'm in a state that requires me to inform, I abide. In my state (PA) I do not have to. I will inform if I'm asked to step out of the car for some reason and then ask how he/she would like me to proceed.

    My $0.02.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  9. #1139
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    More often than not the LEO knows if you have a permit or not before he gets out of the car, thats if he bothers to ck, a lot of states DL# is the same as you CCW permit#, even still when he runs your plates it may come up then, i have been stopped 4 times since I got a permit a few years ago, and in each case the cop walks up and asked where my weapon was, and I would say on my belt, in the consol, or wherever, I never did say I always carryed two, and sometimes three, anyways there never was anything said or done concerning the gun, except one instince where officer Fife, called another cop to guard me, or guard him from me not sure which, while he was running my plates and DL
    Bad Guys of the world beware the next time you think about jumping on a old guy, because its a fair bet he's to old to fight and probably to fat to run, but can put one in your eye at 50ft with his weak hand

  10. #1140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocketgeezer View Post
    More often than not the LEO knows if you have a permit or not before he gets out of the car
    So now police officers have ESP? How does the officer know who is driving the car before he gets out of his?
    Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman. Amerika: a place where the serfs are afraid of the action the police may take against them for perfectly legal behavior.

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