Feb. 1, California residents no longer able to buy ammo or mail online
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Feb. 1, California residents no longer able to buy ammo or mail online

This is a discussion on Feb. 1, California residents no longer able to buy ammo or mail online within the Firearm Politics & 2nd Amendment Issues forums, part of the Main Category category; by mail order. Calif. to impose new law on ammo January 17, 2011 Calif. to impose new law on ammo ...

  1. #1
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    Exclamation Feb. 1, California residents no longer able to buy ammo or mail online

    by mail order.

    Calif. to impose new law on ammo

    January 17, 2011

    Calif. to impose new law on ammo

    Proponents of the law say it will make the task of investigating gun-related crime easier for law enforcement

    By Matt Drange
    Eureka Times - Standard

    While the holiday shopping season is long gone, some Humboldt County residents are stocking up on ammunition for fear of a new California law that goes into effect next month placing restrictions on the purchase of bullets.

    Under the law, those buying handgun ammunition will be required to provide vendors with their thumbprint, address and photo identification, with the idea that it will make the task of investigating and preventing gun-related crime easier for law enforcement. Convicted felons who are already barred from owning a gun, for example, can still purchase bullets under the current law.

    But for some, the restrictions are another example of an infringement on gun rights protected by the Second Amendment.

    "There's a lot of uncertainty. It feels like our government is trying to control us more and more," said a customer at Pro Sport Center in Eureka on Sunday. The customer declined to give his name for this story, but said he's been buying ammunition in recent months every chance he gets.

    "Why have guns without ammunition?" said the customer, adding that he keeps at least a dozen guns at his Blue Lake home, including hunting rifles, handguns and a shotgun that he got from his parents for his 12th birthday. "We're heading for a complete restriction on firearms. I don't want the government to know what's in my gun cabinet."

    Already home to some of the strictest gun laws in the country, California will add to the list beginning on Feb. 1, when people will no longer be able to purchase ammunition via the Internet or by mail order. Instead, buyers will need to pick up their ammunition at licensed vendors, like Pro Sport Center in Eureka.
    John Corbett handles purchasing at the store and said he spent the end of last year traveling to gun shows and preparing for a possible increase in sales.

    "In case there is a run, I want to make sure that we're stocked up," Corbett said, adding that he hopes to avoid a similar situation to the one in 2009, which featured a nation-wide rush on handguns and semi-automatic weapons that many feared would be banned under a new administration.

    "That was the big push for a while," Corbett said. "I remember Glocks being backordered by the thousands."

    Pro Sport Center isn't the only local store preparing for a rush. Ron Snyder, a volunteer at Old West Shootery and Supply in Eureka, said he's seen a similar increase in demand for ammunition in the last month.

    "The .22 caliber is going really fast," Snyder said, adding that gun sales have been relatively stable at the shop, which also features the county's only indoor shooting range. A box of 50 rounds of .22-caliber bullets costs $9.95 at the store."All year they've been coming in, asking to buy 10 boxes at a time," Snyder said. "People are just hoarding ammunition."

    Snyder said the new law is essentially an extension of existing gun laws, which require a background check of buyers and a 10-day waiting period to purchase a gun. Violations will be treated as a misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine.

    To adjust for the new law -- which is being challenged in a lawsuit brought about by gun-rights advocates in Fresno County -- people like Corbett are working on new forms to use when selling ammunition. Stores will soon be required to record who buys bullets, how many and which type, and will have to keep the information on file for five years.

    "It's just one more step for us," Corbett said. "We want a system that's easy on us and, most importantly, easy for the customer."

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    A citizen who shirks his duty to contribute to the security of his community is little better than the criminal who threatens it.

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    santa is offline santa
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    this is just an "end round" the 2nd amendment. they have difficulty banning guns so lets make it harder to get ammo. as rooster cogburn said "an unloaded gun is useless". plus look at those prices. 9.95 for a box of 50? i can buy a brick(500 rounds) here in eastern washington for 15 dollars. of course it will cost the business money to make and keep records. this will force many ammunition vendors to raise prices dramatically or stop selling ammunition. would any leo on this site from california or elsewhere tell us how this will make it any easier to investigate crime? lets invite the gun-ammo-grabbers and criminals to sit down with us and after the criminals(including some polititians) have turned all of their guns and ammo to the police and willingly go to jail we could offer to disarm. if this lunacy about ammo works i will sprout wings and fly.

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    Default Update!!!!!!!!!

    NO: [CALIFORNIA STATE] COURT INVALIDATES UNCONSTITUTIONAL AMMUNITION REGULATION STATUTE (AB962)
    Calguns Foundation ^ | 1/18/2011 |

    In a dramatic ruling giving gun owners a win in an National Rifle Association / California Rifle and Pistol (CRPA) Foundation lawsuit, this morning Fresno Superior Court Judge Jeffrey Hamilton ruled that AB 962, the hotly contested statute that would have banned mail order ammunition sales and required all purchases of so called “handgun ammunition” to be registered, was unconstitutionally vague on its face. The Court enjoined enforcement of the statute, so mail order ammunition sales to California can continue unabated, and ammunition sales need not be registered under the law.

    The lawsuit was prompted in part by the many objections and questions raised by confused police, ammunition purchasers, and sellers about what ammunition is covered by the new laws created by AB 962. In a highly unusual move that reflects growing law enforcement opposition to ineffective gun control laws, Tehama County Sheriff Clay Parker is the lead plaintiff in the lawsuit. Other plaintiffs include the CRPA Foundation, Herb Bauer Sporting Goods, ammunition shipper Able’s Ammo, collectible ammunition shipper RTG Sporting Collectibles, and individual Steven Stonecipher. Mendocino Sheriff Tom Allman also supported the lawsuit.

    The ruling comes just days before the portion of the law that bans mail order sales of so called “handgun ammunition” was set to take effect on February 1, 2011. The lawsuit, Parker v. California is funded exclusively by the NRA and the CRPA Foundation. If it had gone into effect, AB 962 would have imposed burdensome and ill conceived restrictions on the sales of ammunition. AB 962 required that “handgun ammunition” be stored out of the reach of customers, that ammunition vendors collect ammunition sales registration information and thumb-prints from purchasers, and conduct transactions face-to-face for all deliveries and transfers of “handgun ammunition.” The lawsuit successfully sought the declaration from the Court that the statute was unconstitutional, and successfully sought the injunctive relief prohibiting law enforcement from enforcing the new laws.
    A citizen who shirks his duty to contribute to the security of his community is little better than the criminal who threatens it.

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    "Why have guns without ammunition?" said the customer, adding that he keeps at least a dozen guns at his Blue Lake home, including hunting rifles, handguns and a shotgun that he got from his parents for his 12th birthday. "We're heading for a complete restriction on firearms. I don't want the government to know what's in my gun cabinet."

    What a gubber - bragging to a reporter about his arsenal and then stating he doesn't want the governmentt to know what his has in his gun cabinet.

    Reminds of the idiot who 20 years ago told a TV reporter that he didn't mind the Buffalo Bills stadium being so near to his home because every other weekend he made about $1000 allowing fans to park in his field "and the IRS doesn't know about it..." The next week the IRS flew a helicopter over the area and counted the number of parked cars in his field.

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