Is it really that bad to dry fire a DOA pistol?
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Is it really that bad to dry fire a DOA pistol?

This is a discussion on Is it really that bad to dry fire a DOA pistol? within the General Firearm Discussion forums, part of the Main Category category; I know dry firing is bad for your weapon, but on the DAO or Striker fired pistols like the Glock, ...

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    RJ_Whitlock's Avatar
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    Default Is it really that bad to dry fire a DAO pistol?

    I know dry firing is bad for your weapon, but on the DAO or Striker fired pistols like the Glock, XD, and M&P, what other choice do you have? I also know it's bad to leave the firing pin in the cocked position for long periods of time. Any answers on what I should do?

    I own a M&P and I'm new to the Striker fired DAO scene.

    Thank you!
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    I've always been told dry firing was bad but no one ever gave an adequate explanation as to why.

    They always say something about punching air. Having the pin propelled forward and not striking anything somehow stressed the metal beyond its designed use.

    Admittedly when I punch the air with all I got it does hurt my arm. But when I punch the wall it hurts too.

    So I've always kept dry firing to an absolute minimum. And I replace the firing pin every 20 years or so. Even if it's not "bad." I can't imagine that it improves the pistol in any way.

    Striker shmiker. Its the same thing. In one the firing pin is propelled by a blow of the hammer. In the other its propelled by a spring. I'm less than impressed.

    Is it six or half a dozen?

    Obviously I'm not a striker worshiper as is the current fad.

    If it concerns you (as it does me since I'm not really sure). You can use "snap caps." And there will never be a need to dry fire again.

    The firing pin or striker (as the case may be) hits and pushes the metal in the snap cap as it was designed to do with the primer. This solves the problem whether it's real or not.

    I feel I don't have to know the 'truth" as I've solved the problem anyway.

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    cjs
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    I've heard much the opposite: that the majority of modern pistols are ok to be dry fired (with the exception of .22 LR where the firing pin can peen the chamber since it hits the edge). Plenty of schools and experts are proponents of dry firing to practice.

    If you REALLY hate the idea, a decent snap cap (I like A-Zoom perrsonally) can be put in place to absorb the impact of the firing pin.

    Also, DOA typically stands for 'Dead on Arrival'. DAO would be Double-Action Only.

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    Front Sight teaches dry practice (and glocks) for a variety of reasons that are not the point here. However, I've dry practiced for years with glocks and they are fine.

    Oh, if I may, "dry fire"? There is no firing, perhaps "dry practice" might sound better?

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    Quote Originally Posted by cjs View Post
    I've heard much the opposite: that the majority of modern pistols are ok to be dry fired (with the exception of .22 LR where the firing pin can peen the chamber since it hits the edge). Plenty of schools and experts are proponents of dry firing to practice.

    If you REALLY hate the idea, a decent snap cap (I like A-Zoom perrsonally) can be put in place to absorb the impact of the firing pin.

    Also, DOA typically stands for 'Dead on Arrival'. DAO would be Double-Action Only.
    I can't believed I botched DAO that many times, damn I should've payed more attention in high school. My brain goes faster than my hands do when I type.
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    On a Glock type pistol with the fireing pin powered by a spring, I cannot see how there could be any damage caused by dry fireing, if it has a hammer and you dry fire it 10.000 times maybe you might hurt something

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    To even take a Glock apart, you have to dry fire it, and Glock knows that and they obviously are not concerned about it.

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    OK, you want an explanation so here goes.
    You should not dry fire .22 rimfire. As stated above it can damage the firing pin & the chamber face where it hits.
    On old revolvers that have the firing pin attached to the hammer it's a bad idea to dry fire. When the hammer falls, the firing pin fits in a hole to strike the primer. If there is nothing to strike the firing pin can get lodged in the hole or widen the hole or the firing pin can be sheared along its sides.
    Now, I'll tell you that my Ruger SR9 says that you should not dry fire the gun without a magazine in the gun.
    I was told by Ruger that it can damage the magazine safety if you fire it without a magazine in the gun. So since I removed the mag safety I don't worry about this.
    I was also told that it can damage the firing pin from overtravel without a magazine in the gun. I was a bit confused by this & got no real explanation but was told that if I used a snap cap I would be OK. I'm not going to worry about it when I just check for function right after cleaning the gun but if I am going to dry fire for practice I will throw a snap cap in.
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    Default glock ok

    In the Glock manual that comes with every Glock, it says it is ok to dry fire as much as you want

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    This is what my research has come up with on the subject.

    Rimfire firing pin can contact the metal surface the rim of the cartridge sits on, this is bad.

    Floating cylindrical firing pins you can dry fire all day long.

    Floating conical firing pins you can jam or even break if dry fired.

    Ive also heard about the striker firing pins becoming brittle from repeated dry fires, has to do with the molecules of the metal aligning from the slams into an open space.

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