Basic steps of reloading
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Basic steps of reloading

This is a discussion on Basic steps of reloading within the Handgun Ammunition and Reloading forums, part of the Handguns category; Here are the very basic steps of reloading. I have a single stage press. Which means each step must be ...

  1. #1
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    Default Basic steps of reloading

    Here are the very basic steps of reloading.

    I have a single stage press. Which means each step must be done separately. Each step requires a change in the die you are using. Therefore, I will process about ten rounds through each step before I change dies for the next step.


    1. Prepare you cases. Visually inspect each piece of brass for cracks or defects. If they are slightly out of round sizing the brass may correct this. If you are not using carbide dies you must lubricate them. I use Lee Lube. It's inexpensive and works well.

    2. Insert sizing die into press. The height is adjustable. Initially set it high. You can lower it if needed. Place your brass in the press and feed it into the sizer die. This puts it into the correct shape and size. It will also deprime used brass.

    3. I clean the primer pocket at this point. There are small tools you just insert into the primer pocket and spin. I also debur the mouth of the brass. A similar tool is available for this.

    4. Insert the expanding die. This flares the mouth of the shell somewhat to help in placing the bullet. Again adjusting the height of the die effects the amount of flare. Start high. You can lower the die for more expansion, but you cannot raise the die to lesson expansion once you have already done it.

    5. Prime the brass. I use a hand held priming tool. Insert primer slowly and point it away from your face. Many presses have a priming option with them instead of using the hand held primer.

    4. Adjust powder trickler if you have one. Slowly adjust allowing more powder to drop. Each time weigh your charge until you have the correct powder weight. As I load every ten rounds or so I reweigh the powder to insure the powder trickler is providing the correct amount of powder.

    5. Charge the brass with powder. I will set the empty brass on one side of my bench. As I charge them I move them to the other side of the bench. Before setting the bullet visually inspect each to insure powder has been charged.

    6. Insert the bullet seating die. Again start high and adjust to the correct depth. Preferably measure the bullet length with a caliper. This will set the bullet and provide some amount of crimp.

    7. Some die sets come with a crimping die. If so insert and crimp the bullet in.



    These are the basic steps. Not so hard is it?
    Last edited by DrDavidM; 01-21-2008 at 07:14 AM.
    David

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    I have never reloaded before, but I have always been interested in geting into it. I hear it's alot of fun. Does it save money at all? How much would it cost to buy a whole reloading set up? And is it safe? Is there ever any accidents with setting off a primer while reloading, or blowing a gun up because you measured wrong or anything?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cooter View Post
    I have never reloaded before, but I have always been interested in geting into it. I hear it's alot of fun. Does it save money at all? How much would it cost to buy a whole reloading set up? And is it safe? Is there ever any accidents with setting off a primer while reloading, or blowing a gun up because you measured wrong or anything?

    You do save money on the ammo itself over factory loads but actually saving money in the long run..... I don't think I've saved any. The only reason is since I can load the ammo cheap I end up just shooting a lot more.

    I spent $250 on my setup:
    Lee Classic turret press
    .45 ACP carbide dies
    Pro powder pour
    Scale
    Large/small primer feeders
    Tumbler and media

    I have heard of primers going off. The primer can get turned on its side and crushed when seated. I've never had this issue on me Lee press. But I do were safety glasses while reloading.

    I have seen a pistol were the slide was in 3 pieces because of a double load. What I did was mounted a small LED light on my press. This allows me to visually check the powder level in the case. It very easy to spot a double charge. Then every 5 to 10 rounds I weigh the charge to make sure it has not changed. To date I have not had a squib or double charge.

    As long as you pay attention and QA yourself at each step you should not have any issues. I actually trust my loads more then factory loads.
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