Used 22 Cartridge Case Cleaning - Snap Caps
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Used 22 Cartridge Case Cleaning - Snap Caps

This is a discussion on Used 22 Cartridge Case Cleaning - Snap Caps within the Handgun Ammunition and Reloading forums, part of the Handguns category; Iím a newbie, so please be gentle. Wife and I are beginning to get into target shooting. We are starting ...

  1. #1
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    Default Used 22 Cartridge Case Cleaning - Snap Caps

    Iím a newbie, so please be gentle. Wife and I are beginning to get into target shooting. We are starting from near ground zero, and learning fast. Joined NRA, took defensive class, created range on property, bought a few guns, and are having fun. Wife is handicapped, and she canít run, so she has applied for a carry permit. I am having interesting times due to essential tremors. Weíve advanced from just a 12 gauge kept around for general protection, to a 12 and a 20 gauge, two 357ís, and two 22ís. The 357ís are mostly to carry, while the 22ís let us play cheaply. Enough background I think.

    I read about ďsnap capsĒ, and that they were good for the revolver to protect it when dry firing. Bought some for the 357ís, they seem to work. The 22ís are rimfire, not centerfire, so snap caps seem dubious. I found a site that said to just use empty cartridge cases, sounded good, so I tried it. Grrr, junk from inside used cartridge cases got all over the inside of my nice clean cylinders.

    So my question is, how do I clean the junk out of the used cartridge? Can I just swish them around in gasoline? Any chance some little bit of primer might be left, and blow me up?

    Some used cartridges seem to fit better than others. Do the cases get distorted when they are used? Is it a good idea to use old cases this way, or should I just dry fire with nothing in the cylinder? Thanks for all suggestions.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big_Guns View Post
    Iím a newbie, so please be gentle. Wife and I are beginning to get into target shooting. We are starting from near ground zero, and learning fast. Joined NRA, took defensive class, created range on property, bought a few guns, and are having fun. Wife is handicapped, and she canít run, so she has applied for a carry permit. I am having interesting times due to essential tremors. Weíve advanced from just a 12 gauge kept around for general protection, to a 12 and a 20 gauge, two 357ís, and two 22ís. The 357ís are mostly to carry, while the 22ís let us play cheaply. Enough background I think.

    I read about ďsnap capsĒ, and that they were good for the revolver to protect it when dry firing. Bought some for the 357ís, they seem to work. The 22ís are rimfire, not centerfire, so snap caps seem dubious. I found a site that said to just use empty cartridge cases, sounded good, so I tried it. Grrr, junk from inside used cartridge cases got all over the inside of my nice clean cylinders.

    So my question is, how do I clean the junk out of the used cartridge? Can I just swish them around in gasoline? Any chance some little bit of primer might be left, and blow me up?

    Some used cartridges seem to fit better than others. Do the cases get distorted when they are used? Is it a good idea to use old cases this way, or should I just dry fire with nothing in the cylinder? Thanks for all suggestions.

    I haven't seen any "snap caps" in .22 or any "rimfire" cartridge. They have "dummy" or "training" cartridges for use in checking the action and other training applications. I would strongly recommend against using fired casings or anything that could be easily mistaken for a live cartridge. Doing so may result in a ND (Negligent Discharge). Your question regarding dry firing your .22 caliber pistols would be best answered by the manufacturer. To put it another way, "read the book" if you haven't already done so. If you're unable to find the info in the owner's manual that came with the pistol, I would recommend that you contact the manufacturer directly. Most firearms manufacturers have some type of website or other online presence.

    Be sure to get adequate practice with whatever firearm you plan to carry. If you're required to be licensed to carry the firearm, it would be in your best interest (as well as other gun owners) to acquire the proper licensing before carrying the firearm(s). Be sure that you run a couple of boxes of your SD (Self Defense) ammunition through your SD firearms. You don't want to hear your gun go "click" when you need it to go "bang". Some firearms will not cycle ammunition such as hollow points properly. If this is the case with your firearm, have it serviced by an appropriate gunsmith. Cycling problems are usually not a problem with revolvers, but you should train with a couple of boxes of your SD ammunition so you will know what it feels like and see if there is any deviation in the point of impact from your target ammo.

    Get as much range time as you can. When you're not on the range, practice dry firing and drawing from your concealed holster. This can be done at home or anywhere appropriate. (By appropriate I mean an organized training situation. Practicing holster draws while waiting for your Starbucks coffee could get you into a heap of trouble. )

    Feel free to ask if you have any questions. Take a look around at the other threads to see what info is out there. There's a lot of good info on this site, though like any site, there may be some "bad" info as well. If you're unsure of the validity of the info, find a reputable source to verify. Keep in mind that some of the info you receive ANYWHERE online may be worth exactly what you paid for it. In some cases it may even cost you.

    Welcome to USA Carry. Happy shooting and be safe!



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  3. #3
    wolfhunter Guest

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    Dry firing a rimfire weapon like your .22's is bad for the gun. A pack of 6 A-Zoom snap caps can be picked up for about $8. I've never considered using old cases for dry fire training.

  4. #4
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    Default Used .22 Cartridges

    If you call Sturm, Ruger and Co. Inc, you will be told that you may safely dry-fire any Ruger .22 caiber weapon. I just bought the Customizing the Ruger 10/22 book, and it gives the same info. I don't know about any other gun maker, so GF is right, contact the maker, they should know.
    A man without a gun is a subject; a man with a gun is a citizen.
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    Thanks everybody, especially Wolfhunter for a place to look. Although A-Zoom doesn't make .22 snap caps, they DO make dummy rounds. I just ordered some.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big_Guns View Post
    Thanks everybody, especially Wolfhunter for a place to look. Although A-Zoom doesn't make .22 snap caps, they DO make dummy rounds. I just ordered some.
    Don't think you'll find "snap caps" for any rimfire cartridge.


    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

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    The plastic dummy rounds will distort around the edges, and become useless in a short time. I don't dry-fire any of my rimfires (without firing pin support) except for my ruger hand guns. You can use dry wall anchors from a hardware store to dry fire with. I think the blue ones are .22 cal size. They will also need to be replaced, but they're cheaper. You can also slip a small piece of paper in front of the .22 cal bolt, and dry fire it. If the firing pin does not mark the paper, you won't peen the chamber when dryfiring without a snap-cap, or dummy round.
    Only when our arms are sufficient, without doubt, can we be certain, without doubt, that they will never be employed....... John F. Kennedy
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    for revolvers, cut a disk (donut shaped) of heavy plastic that will ride where the cartridges usually ride. I use laundry detergent bottles for this. This does 2 things:
    - visible color at head of cylinder lets you SEE that that the cylinder is unloaded
    - prevents firing pin from impacting on breech face and distoring it

    for autos, I have no problem dropping the pin on spent .22 cartidges. Check, double check, and if you didn't check within the last 2 seconds check again before you drop the trigger.

    happy blastin'

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