Cleaning the Firing Pin channel - how?
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Cleaning the Firing Pin channel - how?

This is a discussion on Cleaning the Firing Pin channel - how? within the Handgun Discussion forums, part of the Handguns category; Several posts about new handguns talk about giving a thorough initial cleaning - okay, i get that. I also clean ...

  1. #1
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    Default Cleaning the Firing Pin channel - how?

    Several posts about new handguns talk about giving a thorough initial cleaning - okay, i get that. I also clean EVERY time i fire one of my guns - rifles, pistols, Muzzleloader, shotguns, all of them.

    Then i started to see advice on cleaning the firing pin channel, or striker pin channel. This is emplaced in the slide, and i'm no gunsmith so disassembly is a disaster i'll avoid.

    How do you clean the firing pin/channel, with what solvents/products, and why? How often - i have some guns i've put thousands of rounds through without cleaning that part of the slide- are they a FTF waiting to happen?

    Please help - i'd like to know how you do it, what you do it with, lessons learned, advice, things to avoid, etc. Thanks!
    "Laws that forbid the carrying of arms ... make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants ... for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man." - Thomas Jefferson

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    theicemanmpls is offline Banned
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    I did a Google on "cleaning the firing pin channel"

    I received several hits. You may want to check them out.

    I personally use a pipe cleaner, solvent, and air compressor.

    BTW, watch that oil. Don't be putting it in the firing pin channel. Your firearm will go click, but won't go boom.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daugherty16 View Post
    Several posts about new handguns talk about giving a thorough initial cleaning - okay, i get that. I also clean EVERY time i fire one of my guns - rifles, pistols, Muzzleloader, shotguns, all of them.

    Then i started to see advice on cleaning the firing pin channel, or striker pin channel. This is emplaced in the slide, and i'm no gunsmith so disassembly is a disaster i'll avoid.

    How do you clean the firing pin/channel, with what solvents/products, and why? How often - i have some guns i've put thousands of rounds through without cleaning that part of the slide- are they a FTF waiting to happen?

    Please help - i'd like to know how you do it, what you do it with, lessons learned, advice, things to avoid, etc. Thanks!
    What gun type? may I ask.

    If taking the thing apart is not for you, a good spray Gun Scrubber works well. Not the best solution over all but well enough. The only issue with the spray Gun Scrubber is it takes all the oil away. You will need to make sure oil is applied where it's required or needed.

    Birchwood-Casey makes one that I use to clean parts that are difficult to get brushes etc into.

    Birchwood

    Peace...
    You can give peace a chance alright..

    I'll seek cover in case it goes badly..

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    My Utah permit instructor told us he cleans his handguns with an ultrasonic jewelry cleaner. NOTE: He did specify that ONLY metal parts be cleaned this way. (I think he said something about the glue used in the polymer frames doesn't hold up in the cleaner) Then he blows them dry with an air compressor.
    The two enemies of the people are criminals and government, so let us tie the second down with the chains of the Constitution so the second will not become the legalized version of the first. - Thomas Jefferson

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    Quote Originally Posted by 6shootercarry View Post
    What gun type? may I ask.

    If taking the thing apart is not for you, a good spray Gun Scrubber works well. Not the best solution over all but well enough. The only issue with the spray Gun Scrubber is it takes all the oil away. You will need to make sure oil is applied where it's required or needed.

    Birchwood-Casey makes one that I use to clean parts that are difficult to get brushes etc into.

    Birchwood

    Peace...
    SW 422, almost 25 years old. Must be striker fired, internal hammer, etc. SAO.
    Beretta 8000 Cougar, mini-model 92. External hammer, decocker/safety. SA/DA
    Taurus 845, external hammer, decocker/safety. SA/DA

    And i didn't mean to say i "couldn't" take them apart, but i want them to work after i've reassembled them...

    The manuals for all dictate that takedown stops at the removal of the slide. Since the firing pin channel is embedded in the slide on all 3, i guess i have the same challenge. The first two are very well used, and the Taurus is new and unfired.
    "Laws that forbid the carrying of arms ... make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants ... for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man." - Thomas Jefferson

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    Consult the user manual that came with your firearm for user level maintenance. Everything you need to know about how to operate and maintain your firearm should be in that manual. If you don't have the manual or need further instruction, consult the manufacturer. Most manufacturers will gladly provide you with a replacement or at minimum, will advise you how to get a copy (some manufacturers post the user manuals on the internet).

    Be careful of what you read on the internet. Some advice is somewhat "over the top" and unnecessary for you as a user to do to maintain your firearm.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glock Fan View Post
    Consult the user manual that came with your firearm for user level maintenance. Everything you need to know about how to operate and maintain your firearm should be in that manual. If you don't have the manual or need further instruction, consult the manufacturer. Most manufacturers will gladly provide you with a replacement or at minimum, will advise you how to get a copy (some manufacturers post the user manuals on the internet).

    Be careful of what you read on the internet. Some advice is somewhat "over the top" and unnecessary for you as a user to do to maintain your firearm.
    gf
    GF - words of wisdom if ever i've heard them! I realize I'm on a fishing expedition here, and as i said, the manuals (i have them all, and am a fairly experienced gunhand) all advise stopping at removal of the slide, barrel and spring assembly. Still, it makes sense that the firing pin or striker pin would get gunked up after a while. I bought a used revolver once, and upon removal of the cylinder i was astounded at the dirt buildup on the extractor rod, srping, and cylinder core. It obviously hadn't been cleaned for a long time, if ever.

    I have thousands of rounds through my Smith and my trusty Beretta, which have never, ever failed to operate.
    I could interpret the manuals silence on cleaning the firing pin to mean it doesn't need it. What do you think?

    Thanks,
    Rick
    "Laws that forbid the carrying of arms ... make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants ... for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man." - Thomas Jefferson

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    Glock's manual also says that it should not be disassembled further than removing the slide, spring, and barrel. Being somewhat anal, that didn't last me very long and I found instructions on the net to take it down to the individual pieces. (And sure enough, powder and lint DO get into those places.) Being somewhat mechanically inclined, I find it fairly simple and can now do it without the instructions. Again, this is for a Glock. I cannot speak to the simplicity or difficulty of a S&W, Beretta, or Taurus. But if you do wish to take it down further, you can likely find instructions on how to do so. Just make sure you read the instructions all the way through before you start. This way you can gauge the difficulty and decide if you think you're up to the task.
    The two enemies of the people are criminals and government, so let us tie the second down with the chains of the Constitution so the second will not become the legalized version of the first. - Thomas Jefferson

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    Quote Originally Posted by utimmer43 View Post
    Glock's manual also says that it should not be disassembled further than removing the slide, spring, and barrel. Being somewhat anal, that didn't last me very long and I found instructions on the net to take it down to the individual pieces. (And sure enough, powder and lint DO get into those places.) Being somewhat mechanically inclined, I find it fairly simple and can now do it without the instructions. Again, this is for a Glock. I cannot speak to the simplicity or difficulty of a S&W, Beretta, or Taurus. But if you do wish to take it down further, you can likely find instructions on how to do so. Just make sure you read the instructions all the way through before you start. This way you can gauge the difficulty and decide if you think you're up to the task.
    Be careful on breaking down any gun further than the owner's manual advises. Instructions on the internet can be inaccurate or incomplete. Failure to reassemble a pistol properly can result in dire consequences. A common problem I find with the Glock pistol is when "ambitious owners" reassemble their Glock and find that the slide locks back after ever shot. If the take down pins aren't put back in the correct order, the slide stop will be reinstalled with "upward pressure" rather than "downward pressure. This would result in the slide stop catching every time the slide is cycled. You will have to release the slide to chamber the next round. Will it go bang? Yes, but will it be operating properly, no. Could this cause problems if you're in a SD situation? Highly likely.

    If in doubt about the level of maintenance needed for your firearm, contact the manufacturer, competent gunsmith or properly trained armorer for that particular handgun. Should you find yourself with a handful of parts, don't be afraid to take it to someone who knows how to properly put it all back together. It's a lot better to spend a few dollars to get it right then to have the gun malfunction on you when you need it the most.

    There are some firearms that require specific tools or even a special tool to properly break down and reassemble. A simple mistake could end up to be a very costly one.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by glock fan View Post
    be careful on breaking down any gun further than the owner's manual advises. Instructions on the internet can be inaccurate or incomplete. Failure to reassemble a pistol properly can result in dire consequences. A common problem i find with the glock pistol is when "ambitious owners" reassemble their glock and find that the slide locks back after ever shot. If the take down pins aren't put back in the correct order, the slide stop will be reinstalled with "upward pressure" rather than "downward pressure. This would result in the slide stop catching every time the slide is cycled. You will have to release the slide to chamber the next round. Will it go bang? Yes, but will it be operating properly, no. Could this cause problems if you're in a sd situation? Highly likely.

    If in doubt about the level of maintenance needed for your firearm, contact the manufacturer, competent gunsmith or properly trained armorer for that particular handgun. Should you find yourself with a handful of parts, don't be afraid to take it to someone who knows how to properly put it all back together. It's a lot better to spend a few dollars to get it right then to have the gun malfunction on you when you need it the most.

    There are some firearms that require specific tools or even a special tool to properly break down and reassemble. A simple mistake could end up to be a very costly one.




    Gf
    amen..
    You can give peace a chance alright..

    I'll seek cover in case it goes badly..

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