GI Rifle Grease
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GI Rifle Grease

This is a discussion on GI Rifle Grease within the Handgun Maintenance, Cleaning and Gunsmithing forums, part of the Handguns category; Came upon an unused can of GI surplus rifle grease in very good condition in that the grease has not ...

  1. #1
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    Default GI Rifle Grease

    Came upon an unused can of GI surplus rifle grease in very good condition in that the grease has not broken down in its consistancy if that is even possible.
    My questions are first, is the grease best used in the area of the action? Is there better material out in this day and age that using GI grease would be substandard? I am not familiar what application the material had relative to the maintenance and upkeep of military arms. What is used for long term storage of firearms or actually as a lubricant for a smooth action? As you can tell, I am more familiar with modern arms and modern day cleaning agents.
    Thanks in advance for your response.

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    Default Cosmoline

    Sometimes called GI Grease has been around a (100 years). [I]'ve purchased many old military rifles over the years and many of them came packed in cosmoline. Its disgusting, smells,and is difficult ti excise from any firearm, mainly because it was applied by dunking the whole rifle in a vat of the stuff. However, I don't think it can be topped for protecting gunmetal and its blueing. Let me give you a good example; several years ago I applied to the gov't for 10 M1 rifles as replacements for our American Legion Springfield 1903's which were worn out. For just the cost of shipping and promise to return the 1903's I received 10 brand new WW2 era M1 rifles which were packed in cosmoline 60 years ago.It took several of our members over two weeks and a gallon of Hoppes to degunk these beauties, but it was worth the elbow grease(excuse the pun).


    NRA Benefactor

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    Default grease

    thank you for your reply. I was just going to use the solution in small amounts around the rails of the slide and frame. Although, I would have some concern that while firing the gun the grease, even with a thin coat, could be a dirt catcher. Do you have any experience in that area?

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by c45man View Post
    thank you for your reply. I was just going to use the solution in small amounts around the rails of the slide and frame. Although, I would have some concern that while firing the gun the grease, even with a thin coat, could be a dirt catcher. Do you have any experience in that area?
    IMHO you are on the right track... Some good grease along the rails is a good idea.. Yes it will attract dirt, but so will oil, but the grease will provide much better protection along the rails.. Just make sure you clean the grease off when you clean the gun and reapply a thin layer of grease when you are done cleaning..

    Gulf Coast, Floriduh
    Sccy is the limit

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    Default

    I hate to say this but I own a S&W Sigma. Everyone complains about the gritty trigger. I found two products that smooth it out. The first is GunSlick graphite lube and the second is a sear grease made by RyDol lubricants.

  6. #6
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    To what extent does the weapon have to be dismantled to apply the material to the trigger according to your system? Is there a way to apply via a field strip?

  7. #7
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    Default

    I have an $8 one pound can of Mobile 1 Synthetic Wheel Bearing grease that I've been using on my semi-auto rails for years with no problems and still have 7/8 of the can left. The synthetic doesn't attract dust as bad and stays in place for a long time.

    I was using Rem-Oil w/ Teflon on the actions until I ran out and tried the wife's Singer Sewing Machine All Purpose Machine Oil for under $3 for four ounces. Works perfectly.

    "A free people should have sufficient arms and ammunition to maintain a status of independence from anyone, including their own government. ~ G. Washington

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