Tough Job
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
Like Tree9Likes

Tough Job

This is a discussion on Tough Job within the LEO Encounters forums, part of the Main Category category; Have several buddies in law enforcement, one @ the local level, two county, one state. Get together with any of ...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    195

    Default Tough Job

    Have several buddies in law enforcement, one @ the local level, two county, one state. Get together with any of them after they've had a few days off and to a man they're the nicest down to earth people you'd ever meet but after 10 or 12 straight days working 12 hrs a day they have completly different personalities from dealing with all the BS they have to deal with in a normal working day, it's a tough job & everyones not cut out for it, but I agree there are a few bad apples out there.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    124

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by old skool View Post
    Have several buddies in law enforcement, one @ the local level, two county, one state. Get together with any of them after they've had a few days off and to a man they're the nicest down to earth people you'd ever meet but after 10 or 12 straight days working 12 hrs a day they have completly different personalities from dealing with all the BS they have to deal with in a normal working day, it's a tough job & everyones not cut out for it, but I agree there are a few bad apples out there.
    Just because there are a "few bad apples" does not mean the apple tree should be cut down.
    NRA RSO, NRA and MA Pistol Instructor. MA (LTC-A), NH (PL), ME (CP), AZ (CWP), FL (CWP). RVN 69-70. 4th ID and 1st Log

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    206

    Default

    I couldn't do it. or rather I would be really bad at it.
    I lean more towards "no victim-no crime" type of thinking so I couldn't write seat belt tickets, or arrest someone for doing/selling drugs, or prostitution, etc..
    I always feel putting someone in cage should be the last resort and only for the most serious offenses.

    I believe most cops are in it for the right reasons, and I believe they have a useful purpose in society..in 99% of encounters I've had..the cops gave the exact amount of respect that they received- or gave more than I deserved at the time.

    I am concerned about the police state we are becoming though, and I dislike that law enforcement has become a so militarized.

    I don't blame the street cop. his kids are going to have to live in it, the same as mine are..so, believe it or not, we're in this together, the citizens should have more empathy and the cops should too.
    in my opinion anyway.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Rocky River, Ohio
    Posts
    1,140

    Default

    There are some VERY rotten orchards out there, Chicago, New Orleans and Philadelphia being three.

    When a police department comes under Federal supervision, it's not because of a "few bad apples". It's because of a profoundly corrupt organizational culture.

    But then some people think that a cop having a citizen assassinated in a contract murder because she filed an internal affairs complaint, or home invasion, and torture RINGS operating INSIDE a police department is "no big deal".

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Seminole, FL
    Posts
    54

    Default

    As an ex police officer, I cannot recall running into any "bad apples," however saying that there are bad apples is such an overused cliche. There are bad apples in teaching (having sex with students, Sandusky, etc), the clergy (abusing little boys), the financial world (you know the stories), the legal profession, politicians, inept physicians, etc., etc., etc.

    I must say that as a police officer, my friends were almost exclusively fellow police officers in that civilians simply didn't have a way to truly relate to what we did and our lifestyle.

  6. #6
    ares338 is offline ares338
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    NE Twxas
    Posts
    96

    Default

    Everyone has a tough job or worse...no job and that's tougher. I chose my profession and therefore chose to deal with the ups and downs. At any time I could have started another career and so could any LEO so I don't buy in completely into the they can't relate bit. I don't have any problems with LE or anyone else for that matter and they are no worse or better than I for what they do for a living.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    CO
    Posts
    1,861

    Default

    It certainly is a tough job, but that is not to say that any other job isn't tough as well.

    More unique than other jobs for sure though.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    5,983

    Default

    My trash collector has a tough job. They don't have automatic trucks in my area and he has to still hump all the trash cans old school. I wouldn't want his job. And he is more likely to die on the job than a police officer is.

    I'm sorry, I just can't bring myself to dust the pedestal off for LEO to stand on. There are many jobs that affect our lives much more on a daily basis that people die in more often than law enforcement. Have you hugged your local farmer or lumber jack lately? The farmer is responsible for food on your table every day for you to eat and the lumberjack is responsible for the roof that you sleep under every day. They die more often on the job than LEO does. Where is their pedestal?

    I respect law enforcement officers exactly the same as I respect the person that takes away my trash every week, the person that provides food for me and my family, and the person that provides for the roof over my head.

    What I find very humorous is all the threads get started when people feel the need to tell us about some LEO encounter where the officer did their jobs, within the bounds of law, in a pleasant manner, and did not hassle during some traffic stop when they were told about the presence of a gun. Even if we had a sub forum for trash collector, farmer and lumberjack encounters, I doubt many people would post about how great those people are when they follow the law, do their jobs, respect others, and not abuse their authority.
    Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman. Amerika: a place where the serfs are afraid of the action the police may take against them for perfectly legal behavior.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    5,983

    Default

    A police officer just wants to go home safe to his family at the end of his shift. Many military personnel just want to go home safe to their families after a 6 to 18 month deployment.
    Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman. Amerika: a place where the serfs are afraid of the action the police may take against them for perfectly legal behavior.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Medford, OR
    Posts
    856

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sandy Scott View Post
    As an ex police officer, I cannot recall running into any "bad apples," however saying that there are bad apples is such an overused cliche. There are bad apples in teaching (having sex with students, Sandusky, etc), the clergy (abusing little boys), the financial world (you know the stories), the legal profession, politicians, inept physicians, etc., etc., etc.

    I must say that as a police officer, my friends were almost exclusively fellow police officers in that civilians simply didn't have a way to truly relate to what we did and our lifestyle.
    I was a civilian technician employed by a police agency for over a decade. I repaired the police equipment, and new all of the officers well. I never met any cops who committed criminal acts, but they ranged from those who would get a "thank you" from the driver when they handed them the ticket to those who were in an altercation the minute contact was made. While I had lots of friends outside the department, I got a taste of the cop/civilian thing from time to time - you know, the guy who insists on telling you how his cousin's friend's wife, who lives on the other side of the country got a speeding ticket 10 years ago, and wouldn't I agree that she couldn't have POSSIBLY been guilty.

    Oh, yeah... Most civilians do not understand how a cop can, over lunch, laugh about the grinder he worked the night before. The cant figure out that it's a relief valve...

    But, I agree with one of the posts below. It's not the only job in town. Like any other job, if a person doesn't like it, they can look for one that fits them better.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •