Reloading range brass
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
Like Tree11Likes

Reloading range brass

This is a discussion on Reloading range brass within the Long Gun Ammunition and Reloading forums, part of the Long Guns category; What are your opinions about reloading brass picked up off a public range? Yea.. No way? I work as a ...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,517

    Default Reloading range brass

    What are your opinions about reloading brass picked up off a public range? Yea.. No way?

    I work as a RSO at a local range and while I work I get the chance to pick up a lot of brass. Right now I divide it into two groups. The brass that I pick up knowing that it came from a reliable manufacturer and run through a gun in good working order and the "other stuff" I find laying around. I see no issue in reloading the brass I saw fired and plan on recycling the "other" for cash.

    Other RSOs I work with have no issue reloading the "other" brass but I don't know if it is the best practice.

    Thoughts?

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2
    Time to add FireMarshall Bill to the block list.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Grand Junction, CO
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I have been picking up range brass for more years than I can count. I have only had 2 or 3 problems in thousands of rounds. Before you clean it take a look. Look for signs of pressure or having been reloaded several times. If you see signs like that throw it away. Also when your priming it, if the primer pocket has been enlarged get rid of that brass also. If there is any question in your mind that the brass is no good don't reload it. However it cuts reloading costs.

    Just my 2 cents worth

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Used to reload and share ammo with my friend. My ammo would not fit in his gun as his chamber was at the low end of specs and mine at the high end. He could chamber it with effort but it would not eject. Don't use it if it not from the same gun.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,517

    Default Re: Reloading range brass

    Quote Originally Posted by jimster View Post
    Used to reload and share ammo with my friend. My ammo would not fit in his gun as his chamber was at the low end of specs and mine at the high end. He could chamber it with effort but it would not eject. Don't use it if it not from the same gun.
    Were you resizing your brass or just the neck?

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2
    Time to add FireMarshall Bill to the block list.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Just resized the neck. It was 50 years ago and I was but a youngster didn't even think about till you said something. I will retain this infor for future use. Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    USA...USA...USA!
    Posts
    731

    Default Reloading range brass

    A semi-automatic firearm has a larger throat in the chamber than other actions. This expands the case neck larger when firing than a bolt gun etc. If you use a small base reloading die any brass will be re-sized down to the correct tolerances for either, and should guarantee no trouble if using range brass. Now I haven't loaded many rounds yet as I just started a month ago. However, what I have loaded has had no issues and it's all been a mix of range brass.
    Guns.??? What Guns???

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,517

    Default Re: Reloading range brass

    Quote Originally Posted by Kalamity023 View Post
    A semi-automatic firearm has a larger throat in the chamber than other actions. This expands the case neck larger when firing than a bolt gun etc. If you use a small base reloading die any brass will be re-sized down to the correct tolerances for either, and should guarantee no trouble if using range brass. Now I haven't loaded many rounds yet as I just started a month ago. However, what I have loaded has had no issues and it's all been a mix of range brass.
    It is more an issue that when you fire a round in a gun the brass is fire formed to that specific chamber which allows you to resize the neck and use it again in the same gun. But It may not fIt In other guns. That works very well in a bolt action.

    A semi auto depends on looser tolerances for the brass to feed reliably.

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2
    Time to add FireMarshall Bill to the block list.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    177

    Default

    As long as the brass I P/U is fairly clean and shows no signs of abuse I reload it. Most brass I find is from people who don't reload and just leave it lay. Meaning it is once fired factory brass!
    Endeavor to Persevere, Freedom is not Free

  9. #9
    golocx4's Avatar
    golocx4 is offline Got Beretta's?
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Elma NY
    Posts
    1,632

    Default

    My re-loading mentor taught me.
    Pick up case, Inspect. before each and every process and then again with the finished round.
    Split brass, bad seated primers, poor or no crimp, and on and on.
    Not the fastest process in the world but it is about quality and safety.
    Tolerance of the intolerant leads to the destruction of tolerance. “You are also reminded that any inappropriate remarks or jokes concerning security may result in your arrest,” in the land of the free.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    MN USA
    Posts
    29

    Default

    I've been doing it for years also. I do use a depriming die to remove primers, gives you a good idea if the pockets are still tight.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •