54 Year old Survival Gun I'd forgotten about
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54 Year old Survival Gun I'd forgotten about

This is a discussion on 54 Year old Survival Gun I'd forgotten about within the Survival Related forums, part of the Outdoors category; by CTD Rob I love guns. I especially love guns that fill a niche in my arsenal. I found myself ...

  1. #1
    mmckee1952 is offline Banned
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    Default 54 Year old Survival Gun I'd forgotten about

    by CTD Rob
    I love guns. I especially love guns that fill a niche in my arsenal. I found myself recently noticing a hole in my lineup. I did not have a survival rifle. I needed something small that I can throw in a pack, or chuck behind the seat of my truck. It needed to have the accuracy of a rifle, but with more portability. Its primary role would be shooting very small game for survival purposes. A takedown .22 would fill the role perfectly, and there were plenty of choices on hand. It seems like several major gun companies produced a takedown .22 at some point. I measured costs versus benefit and came up with a gun that is not only fun to shoot, but useful as well!

    Henry Survival Rifle
    The Henry U.S. Survival AR-7is currently the third most popular firearm we sell at Cheaper Than Dirt. Part of the reason for that popularity is the low price, but Henry gives you a lot for your money. The Henry Survival Rifle is the modern version of the legendary AR-7. The Air Force originally issued the AR-7 as a survival rifle for downed pilots, and there have been several variants by various manufacturers since.

    Henry’s version only weighs about 3.5 pounds, making it over a pound lighter than the Ruger Takedown Rifle. When you stuff all the parts into the stock of the gun, its 16.5-inch stature makes it the perfect size to throw into your backpack. Henry made the stock out of ABS plastic, which is both waterproof and impact resistant—an important feature in a survival situation. Assembling the rifle is quick and easy. If you have any experience with firearms at all, you will not need to read the instructions. The eight-round magazine and semi-automatic design make this weapon a perfect squirrel or small varmint hunter. The rifle seems to give the shooter peace of mind when lost in the wilderness or on an extended hiking trip.

    Components are Stored in the Stock
    This version of the AR-7 comes with a grooved rail mounted on top of the receiver. This makes mounting a scope or red-dot optica breeze, but I chose to use the iron sights for my test, since a scope will not fit inside the buttstock. Henry colored the front sight post bright orange, which made target acquisition seamless. When you shoulder this rifle, there is no handguard on the barrel. I chose to wrap my hand around the magazine well, which I sometimes do when shooting my AR-15. This gave me enough stability to make accurate shots out to about 50 yards. Even with the Henry’s extraordinary light weight, recoil was non-existent, which I expected coming from a .22 LR. The low recoil made follow-up shots a breeze and if you are a novice shooter, flinching is less of an issue. I used CCI Mini-Mag High Velocity ammunition for my test run, and had zero problems after 100 rounds. I have heard of older model AR-7s having feeding issues with various types of ammo, so I opted for good ammo and factory magazines. If this were an every day shooter, this would be a bigger issue for me. However, considering that it is an emergency only rifle, I decided to pony up for decent stuff.

    As far as a backpacking rifle, the Henry fills the role nicely. While there are other choices in semi-automatic .22s, this little takedown does exactly what Eugene Stoner designed it to do. I would have no qualms about keeping this around to turn some woodland critters into an emergency dinner.

    Specifications and features:

    Semi-automatic
    .22 LR
    Two 8-round magazines included
    35 inches long when assembled
    16.5 inches when stowed
    Weighs 3.5 lbs.
    Stock constructed of ABS Plastic
    Adjustable rear sights
    Teflon® coated receiver and coated steel barrel

  2. #2
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    I bought one of these this last winter because I think it's an ingenious concept and I was curious. Plus it was for a really great price. I must say that I'm impressed with it. It's an older version of the Henry and one mag has some feeding issues, but overall, I think it's a great little gun.
    ~ Bill

  3. #3
    mmckee1952 is offline Banned
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    The October edition of Guns & Ammo has a really good article on this gun.

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    I love mine. Great little rifle.

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    Default Re: 54 Year old Survival Gun I'd forgotten about

    If I had to trust my life to a survival rifle I would take the 10-22 over the Henry.

    The Henry is less durable, the plastic covered thin metal barrel doesn't look like it would survive much damage. The stock while perfect for storing the gun is awkward. The action trends to stick when dirty. The front site is kinda flimsy and prone to coming loose. The killer feature is that it floats when taken down.

    If I had to trust a breakdown rifle for long term survival I think the accuracy and reliability of the 10-22 world be my go to gun.

    Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk 2
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    Just saw one in the gun shop the other day. I've looked them over for years, and heard they work well, but I still prefer the 10/22. Nice "urban camo" on yours Maine04619!

  7. #7
    mmckee1952 is offline Banned
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    From Cheaper than dirt

    Henry U.S. Survival Semi Automatic Rimfire Rifle .22 Long Rifle 16" Barrel 8 Rounds Black Synthetic Stock Black Teflon Finish

    Our Low Price:

    $209.24

    Manufacturer: Henry Repeating Arms Co H002B
    Item: 2-HENH002B
    UPC: 619835002006

    Henry U.S. Survival Semi Automatic Rimfire Rifle .22 Long Rifle 16" Barrel 8 Rounds Black Synthetic Stock Black Teflon Finish.

    Henry Repeating Arms has tooled up to manufacture a new and improved version of the famous U.S. Air Force AR-7, now known as the Henry U.S. Survival rifle. This compact and lightweight sportsman's rifle is ideal for all outdoorsmen, including campers, backpackers, hunters, fishermen, boat owners and target shooters. And it can still serve its original purpose as a survival rifle for pilots.

    Specifications and features:
    Henry U.S. Survival semi automatic rifle
    .22 Long Rifle
    16" barrel
    Two 8 round magazines
    Grooved receiver for standard rimfire scope mounts
    Adjustable rear sight, blade front sight
    Black ABS synthetic stock and rubber recoil pad
    Black Teflon finish
    35" overall length
    2.5 lbs unloaded

  8. #8
    titon is offline Banned
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    it's made of pot metal, guys. the rear sight sucks, the front and rear sights are on different parts of the gun. take it apart and put it together a few times, nd the barrel will "wiggle" in the receiver enough to ruin any accuracy you had, and that wasnt; much, believer that. They don't float LONG when assembled, either. :-) The Marlin Papoose is a far, far better gun. Look for used ones, cause it's out of production, on GunBroker.com, and GunsAmerica.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by titon View Post
    it's made of pot metal, guys. the rear sight sucks, the front and rear sights are on different parts of the gun. take it apart and put it together a few times, nd the barrel will "wiggle" in the receiver enough to ruin any accuracy you had, and that wasnt; much, believer that. They don't float LONG when assembled, either. :-) The Marlin Papoose is a far, far better gun. Look for used ones, cause it's out of production, on GunBroker.com, and GunsAmerica.com
    Mine pictures already posted has been used for many years the barrel is still snug after being broke down countless times and used on many camping trips. As for the floating I very much disagree and can prove they float for at least 12 days! How do I know well many years ago on a canoe trip down the Machias river I had the misfortune of having my canoe tip and mine the one posted ( when it was all black ) got loose of the bungee cords and I never noticed. I did not realize it was gone until the next day. Two days later when I got back I told people I had lost it. 10 days later I got a call that it was found. A guy and his kids fishing found it floating in a clump of weeds. The inside of the stock was still bone dry. I am unsure about your experience with this rifle but mine have been far different then your statements.

  10. #10
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    The title brought to my attention my 59 year old survival gun I still shoot today.

    When I was 5 years old my Grand Father gave me a 22cal. bolt action Marlin rifle, just as he did all of his Grandsons.

    I wasn't allowed to take mine out until my Brother John was old enought to take his out and he was two years younger.

    This little 22 still will shoot the eye out of a chipmunk at 40 yards, and has had thousands and thousands of rounds shot through it.

    If anything went really bad and I could only chuse one of the many firearms I now have to take with me.

    It would be my 59 year old Marlin and as many 22 HP Remington Long rifle shells as I could carry.
    “Every step we take towards making the State our Caretaker of our lives, by that much we move toward making the State our Master.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower

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