Bug Out Bags, will they get you killed?
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Bug Out Bags, will they get you killed?

This is a discussion on Bug Out Bags, will they get you killed? within the Survival Related forums, part of the Other category; Ok, so Ive seen a few videos on youtube, and got into a discussion with my brother about BOBs. He ...

  1. #1
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    Unhappy Bug Out Bags, will they get you killed?

    Ok, so Ive seen a few videos on youtube, and got into a discussion with my brother about BOBs. He hasnt started one, and seen a small one I keep in my closet. He happened to mention something about the weight. Him being a former Marine, I thought he was calling me a "sissy" for being an Army guy. He mentioned that it was really light. Mines about 35 to 40lbs, heres why incase some of you are wondering.

    My theory has always been to pick up what you need along the way. Some people tend to put WAY too much stuff in their bags, most of the time, you wont use everything you have in there, and alot of people think long term such as traps and snares, which I have always considered to be long term survival gear, do I have a long term bag? No. Why you may ask, well, because again, you can always pick up things along the way. Another thing that seems to bother me is everyone prepares for woodland type scenarios. Honestly, chances of you getting from a township to a woodland area FAR from people is slim and none, especially if SHTF. All that extra weight is going to wear you down, get you killed and make you a target of opportunity. Main things needed are ways to start fire, ways to disinfect water, some light weight food, cold weather gear, first aid gear, self defense equipment and maybe something to set up a small shelter. Nothing more, at least in my opinion.

    Look at it this way, 80% of America is populated in one way or another. Small towns, villages, and big cities everywhere. Buildings occupy majority of our American landscape, why fill your bag with tents, shelter building equipment when you already have it in place, all your doing is wasting space. Food, theres supermarkets everywhere, and by the way, I would not recommend going to one in a SHTF scenario, theyre hot beds for looters, gangs and just plain trouble, you, your group, family or whoever you Bug out with is going to put yourself at unnecessary risk. Heres my thought, obvious unoccupied homes where persons have grabbed what they can and left are perfect for grabbing what you need, obviously at night and only after you have exhausted what ever food items you have brought. Canned goods and sometimes raw meat from freezers could be grabbed, IF there are any left, you can also refill water bottles and canteens this way while you make your way either on foot, or by what ever means you are using to get to a less populated area.
    Medical supplies should be packed inside your bag. I recommend tourniquets, pressure bandages, super glue, CPR items, stomach medicine, and other major essentials you are trained or qualified to use. Hospitals will be overrun with sick, injured and law figures. Use what youve got, and again, you can always resupply at vacant homes.
    Fire related gear is easiest to pack, its not to hard to carry large quantities of lighters, matches or flint sticks in your bag, in my opinion, theyre a must.
    Weapons are an obvious, in most SHTF scenarios thugs come out in the thick, bladed objects, firearms and ammunition are a must, obviously follow state and local laws for anything other than a WROL situation which seems to be what most preppers prepare for.

    I am not by any means a hardcore prepper. I have a limited amount of ammunition seeing as ammo seemed to disappear after I had alot of fun at my fathers land days before the shortage had hit. I also have a very limited budget to work in, most of the time I pick up what I can at gas stations, or the local walmart.
    My bag doesnt hold alot, I know everyone is different, but my brother figured it would way almost as much as I do for some reason, or as much as a normal Army/Marine ruck sack or assault bag.
    I keep the following:
    My Security Officer duty belt
    OC, Baton, Handcuffs, Firearm (M&P 40) 2 spare mags (45 rounds on the belt), multi tool, hand cuffs, and a flashlight.
    Bag
    striking tool to start fire, lighters, matches, 8 kem lights, thermal blanket, 200 rounds of assorted shotgun ammo, 200 rounds of 40 cal 400 rounds of 9mm. 2 spare pair of socks, 1 pair of ACU pants, 2 shirts, 2 poweraid water bottles, 2 canteens, 1 water bladder, machete, hatchet, 500 feet of 550 cord, small OD Green tarp, multi tool, knife sharpener, 8 in fixed blade knife, 2 folding knives, 1 pair of binos, AA and AAA Batteries, 2 oz can of bleach, water purifying tablets, universal Fosset key (for water spikets on buildings) various over the counter medicines, bandages, Gorilla tape, trenching tool.
    Thats the majority of it that I can think of off the top of my head.

    I figured this could be at least my 2c to add to the BOB talk. Hope my experience and advice helps in some way, and maybe makes some of you think "sheesh mine MAY be over packed" because you never know, if the wife or oldest child has to lug it around, it may sap his/her strength or maybe your own. Chances are roadways will be grid locked and you may have to go on foot. My unit always said, if you cant hike 20 miles with your pack with small rest periods in between its too heavy. Water and Ammo will be most of your weight, and carry what you can on your body, not in your bag. Most of my gear is around my waist or on my chest, smaller items I can go without in case I have to dump the bag.

    Id like your guys in put.
    Thanks for reading.
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    Being out of shape and trying to carry your bag is more likely to get you killed. People put a lot of time and money into their gadgetry and none into the foundation of their weapons system, mind, body and spirit.
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    Check out NUTNFANCY on Youtube. He has a video series called Urban Survival Kit. Don't have time to hunt down and post the link, I'm heading out the door for work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRBruce View Post
    Being out of shape and trying to carry your bag is more likely to get you killed. People put a lot of time and money into their gadgetry and none into the foundation of their weapons system, mind, body and spirit.
    Have to agree. From what the OP said they have, the ammo alone weighs 35 pounds. 800+ rounds? Better find a place to bury it early on so you can come back to it when/if needed. I guess it all depends on where you live. I can get to the middle of nowhere with a 5 mile walk. Lugging all that ammo might be possible and worth it.

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    In most situations I don’t think “bugging out” is really a viable option. Most disasters are localized even Katrina most of those folks would have been better off driving away from the storm and getting a hotel.

    It would have to be Red Dawn before I even thought about bugging out and by that I mean a situation where there is literally nowhere else to go.

    So, with no where else to go even if you bug out into the mountains you are going to have to be able to get farther away than a whole bunch of folks who are trying to do the same thing and most of them won’t be as prepared as you so they’re going to be trying to steal your stuff. Has anyone reading this post ever done the Appalachian trail with no overnights in civilization and eating only what you’ve carried in or off the land? That’s the kind of hiking you’re going to have to be able to do. Even the infantry gets helicopter resupply every so often.

    Once you’re out there you’re going to have to start gathering food for the winter immediately (IOW you are now tied down to one place) and those of us that live in Colorado Springs got a really good object lesson why you’d better be real careful in the woods this time of year last Tuesday what are you going to do when you see a hundred foot high wall of fire two miles wide heading at you at you in front of 65 MPH winds?

    Now having said that I will say that I think having an evacuation kit is a good idea. During the Black Forest Fire there were residents that were told you have to leave right now get in your car and go. They had to leave pets behind; they had to leave important papers behind. They left literally with the clothes they were wearing and the gas in their cars and a lot of them came back to a pile of ash.

    As I’m writing this the entire town of South Fork Colorado has been evacuated and is expected to be a total loss and the entire town of Walsenburg has been placed on pre evacuation status.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treo;444751 During the Black Forest Fire there were residents that were told you have to leave [I
    right now[/I] get in your car and go. They had to leave pets behind; they had to leave important papers behind. They left literally with the clothes they were wearing and the gas in their cars and a lot of them came back to a pile of ash.

    As I’m writing this the entire town of South Fork Colorado has been evacuated and is expected to be a total loss and the entire town of Walsenburg has been placed on pre evacuation status.
    There has been floated in various forums the idea of a "Two Minute" bag. Basically a bag with specific items already, and room for other items you need and could grab in two minutes or less. Items to keep in the bag may include maps, hand-powered radio, change of clothes for 3 days, extra ammo, water storage and filtration, lighters/matches, tarp, first aid kit, utility knife, etc. Such items to grab would be medications, cell phone, home defense handgun, etc. Basically anything that you use daily or need quick access to. I admit I haven't set a two minute bag up yet, or an Urban Survival Kit. The 2013 Hurricane season started June 1st, so I should probably get on that.

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    Not going to bash anyone here, most who know me here know I'm not that way. But BOB's need to be tailored for your area. Those in desert areas are going to need water more than woodland areas. In my area 1.5 miles I'm in the bush. Tall trees, 100'+ and scrub that would have you in rags in 2 days. Some I know live in heavily populated areas and I'm sure your design would be different than mine. My whole state has less than some medium size cities up north, less than 300K.
    My bugging out would be to the wooded high country where food, water and shelter is available if you know where to go. Lookout points that cover very large areas.
    Without giving away your bug out location, what are your priorities and why?
    Sorry not trying to highjack this thread. Just thought this would be a natural extension of bugging out.
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    Agree, bugging out is an absolute last ditch effort. Treo is correct in the two-minute bag if case of natural disaster. I have a flash drive setup with copies of important documents, photos, etc. It is a good flashdrive that is enclosed to be dust, shock resistant. It is attached to the keyring that is always with me. If we have to leave and end up coming back to nothing, then I at least have copies to start over with.
    As stated before, if it is the get out of town type situation, family all knows where the property is. Deer hunting land we have is good to live off of, has water, plenty of wildlife, numerous treestands for both hunting & could be used for defense, etc.
    Every vehicle family owns has water in it, some power bars for emergency food, and a good first aid kit & LED flashlight. Simple tools needed if stranded come in handy if it is worse.
    There is already a hidden gun safe there with ammo for our normal hunting rifles/shotguns and a supply for our EDC's. Son and I both carry same carry caliber so good there.
    We have a few guys at work who carry BOB's. Problem is, everyone at work knows what they are and due to their mouths, what is in them. Not hard to figure out how to get stuff you need when people advertise.

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    I'll just take a BOB from someone I befriend. I'm the government, I'm here to help you.

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    I won't go over what you should have in your bag in detail but I will add that if you have children, you shouldn't forget about their needs. If you have a child in diapers and you HAVE to leave, do you have them? What about wipes? Enough food for them? Water? How exactly will you transport them? Just something to think about. Like others have said, bugging out should be a last resort and not a first thought. Keep it as light as possible, either way.
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