Cleaning a drum for water.
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Cleaning a drum for water.

This is a discussion on Cleaning a drum for water. within the Survival Related forums, part of the Other category; I have the opportunity to get a 275gal container from my work. I would like to use it to store ...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Norhtern, KY
    Posts
    204

    Default Cleaning a drum for water.

    I have the opportunity to get a 275gal container from my work. I would like to use it to store water. Right now it it being used to store antifreeze. Would you use it and how would you clean it out?
    Andrew

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Central Nevada
    Posts
    714

    Default

    What material is the container made of? Is it something that would absorb the antifreeze?
    "When the outflow exceeds the inflow, the upkeep becomes the downfall"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    1,833

    Default

    If you are talking of storing drinking water in it I would not. When I was having to test transformers for PCB's I learned that one drop of PCB in that 225 gallon drum would make it unacceptable. I don't know the specifics of anti-freeze but it would be hard to ever clean that drum to use for drinking water. However I doubt that it would actually hurt you but why take the chance.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Honolulu, HI & Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    2,797

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by abock33 View Post
    I have the opportunity to get a 275gal container from my work. I would like to use it to store water. Right now it it being used to store antifreeze. Would you use it and how would you clean it out?

    I would highly advise against it. You could use the drum to store "non-potable" water. Be sure to clearly mark it as such. Any container used for storing food or water for human consumption should be made of materials that are FDA approved. There are many options out there. A few local restaurants sell plastic drums that contained vinegar, cooking oil or other "food stuffs". I've purchased many of these drums and have about a half dozen of them currenly full of water that I will use as my "emergency drinking water". I also have a healthy supply of plain liquid bleach that will be used to purify the water as needed.

    The 275 gal container would be great to store water to be used for sanitation (bathing or washing hands after using the toilet). The container can be cleaned up for this purpose using a lot of water and scrubbing thoroughly with an industrial cleaner such as "Simple Green". I have 2 "non-potable" water drums that are used for this purpose.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  5. #5
    Cooter's Avatar
    Cooter is offline Liberty or Death
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon
    Posts
    637

    Default

    I'm not a chemical expert, but I would not use any container for drinking water that had antifreeze in it. Ever use an old fruit juice jug for water? You can still smell the juice for long after it's been washed. I wouldn't risk it with a deadly poison.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]In order to rally people, governments need enemies. They want us to be afraid, to hate, so we will rally behind them. And if they don't have a real enemy, they'll invent one in order to mobilize us.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Norhtern, KY
    Posts
    204

    Default

    Those were my thoughts. We go through a container every 2 weeks and the company has to pay to get rid of them. I was going to grab one for my self if I was positive I could get it sterile. I'll see if I can find out the material, maybe I could use it for something else. Thx for the help.
    Andrew

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Kenmare, ND
    Posts
    222

    Default

    Usually its a triple rinse process that the container have to go through before they can be used again. But, they will not ever be used for food grade contents.

    You could still use one, or more, of those containers to collect rainwater. That way you can collect the water for free, and its probably good enough (after being rinsed) to use to water your plants, or for cleaning up, as mentioned before.

  8. #8
    CathyInBlue's Avatar
    CathyInBlue is offline Tool Maker
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    991

    Default

    For rainwater, I'd check the numbers on quantities of antifreeze that can be consumed by a human being or other anmal before there are any detectable (not detrimental, but simply detectable) effects on health, and then clean them sufficiently to insure that those amounts/concentrations can never possibly build up in anyone who eats the foods grown from them, perhaps even going so far as to apply a coating of a plastic sealer inside the barrel.

    But I adhere to the basic rule of water safety, if the container has ever held anything not beneficial to human biology, DO NOT DRINK FROM IT. If it was only ever used to freight salsa or orange juice or chicken broth, fine, but not motor oil or anti-freeze or hydraulic fluid.

    I'd say the best thing you guys could do with them is to punch holes around the periphery right above the base, weld on some artisticly bent rebar for legs to keep the base up off the ground, and sell them as garbage burning barrels.

    Absent that, just drain them, pop the bottoms off, tip the barrels on side, squash the drum to half its original diameter, toss the bottom inside, finish squashing it flat as a sheet of paper and start stacking them up out back. Run a lottery for guesses as to how high the stack can get before it tips over. The winner gets the lottery proceeds plus the scrap value of the flattened barrels when they're taken to the scrap yard.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    ny
    Posts
    62

    Default

    steam cleaning would help but i still wouldnt drink out of it.

  10. #10
    toreskha's Avatar
    toreskha is offline Titles are un-American.
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,437

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by abock33 View Post
    Those were my thoughts. We go through a container every 2 weeks and the company has to pay to get rid of them. I was going to grab one for my self if I was positive I could get it sterile. I'll see if I can find out the material, maybe I could use it for something else. Thx for the help.
    Put a drum liner inside and you might be able to use it for more stuff.

    Be careful though. Even if you plan to just store toilet flushing water in it, everyone might not realize its chemical history. Someone might stupidly take a drink thinking it's clean water.
    Silent Running, by Mike and the Mechanics

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •