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I'm a S.Carolina CWP holder. About to go to Florida for a couple of weeks....

This is a discussion on I'm a S.Carolina CWP holder. About to go to Florida for a couple of weeks.... within the Traveling With Handguns forums, part of the Handguns category; You are fine. Georgia Law says you may carry a loaded firearm anywhere in your vehicle. You just cannot go ...

  1. #11
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    You are fine. Georgia Law says you may carry a loaded firearm anywhere in your vehicle. You just cannot go walking around with it concealed on your person. If you spend a lot of time in Georgia get a Pennsylvania or New Hampshire Concealed Weapons Permit and you can carry concealed in Georgia. Relax and enjoy your trip.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Throttleup View Post
    You are fine. Georgia Law says you may carry a loaded firearm anywhere in your vehicle. You just cannot go walking around with it concealed on your person. If you spend a lot of time in Georgia get a Pennsylvania or New Hampshire Concealed Weapons Permit and you can carry concealed in Georgia. Relax and enjoy your trip.
    Promise?! I don't wanna be in the Savannah pokie!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by nca_mm View Post
    Promise?! I don't wanna be in the Savannah pokie!
    I just found this on the Handgunlaw.us site.

    § 16-11-126. Possession and Carrying a Concealed Weapon; Penalty for Violating Licensing Requirement

    (a) Any person who is not prohibited by law from possessing a handgun or long gun may have or carry on
    his or her person a weapon or long gun on his or her property or inside his or her home, motor vehicle, or
    place of business without a valid weapons carry license.

    (b) Any person who is not prohibited by law from possessing a handgun or long gun may have or carry on
    his or her person a long gun without a valid weapons carry license, provided that if the long gun is loaded, it
    shall only be carried in an open and fully exposed manner.

    (c) Any person who is not prohibited by law from possessing a handgun or long gun may have or carry any
    handgun provided that it is enclosed in a case and unloaded.

    (d) Any person who is not prohibited by law from possessing a handgun or long gun who is eligible for a
    weapons carry license may transport a handgun or long gun in any private passenger motor vehicle;
    provided, however, that private property owners or persons in legal control of property through a lease, rental
    agreement, licensing agreement, contract, or any other agreement to control access to such property shall
    have the right to forbid possession of a weapon or long gun on their property, except as provided in Code
    Section 16-11-135. No Permit License Is needed to carry the firearm inside your Motor Vehicle either openly
    or concealed.

    Note: The GA Court of Appeals ruled in (Hubbard v. State, 210 Ga. App. 141, 143-44 1993) that if you do
    not have a permit/license honored in GA you can only carry a firearm in “Your Own Vehicle.” This means
    you can carry in “Your Own Vehicle” without a permit/license but if you are riding in a vehicle that is not
    yours you must have permission of the person who has legal control of the vehicle
    -

  4. #14
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    Here's a court document on "Glovebox Carry"; taken off the same site.

    Lindsey v. State, 277 GA 772 (2004) Lawanda J. O'Bannon, Atlanta, for appellant.
    Joseph J. Drolet, Solicitor-General, Katherine Diamandis, Asst. Solicitor-General, for appellee.
    CARLEY, Justice.

    When Juan Lindsey was arrested for various traffic offenses, the officer impounded his vehicle. During a search of
    the car, a loaded pistol was found in the pocket of the door on the passenger side. Lindsey was charged with carrying
    a concealed weapon in violation of subsection (a) of OCGA § 16-11-126. Subsection (d) of that statute provides, in
    relevant part, that the crime of "carrying a concealed weapon," as previously defined, shall not forbid any person
    who is not among those enumerated as ineligible for a license under Code Section 16-11-129 from transporting a
    loaded firearm in any private passenger motor vehicle in an open manner and fully exposed to view or in the glove
    compartment, console, or similar compartment of the vehicle....

    Lindsey filed a general demurrer, urging that subsection (d) was unconstitutionally vague. The trial court refused to
    rule on the constitutionality of the statute, concluding that the issue was not properly before it. After a bench trial,
    Lindsey was found guilty. On appeal, the Court of Appeals remanded the case for entry of an order on the
    constitutional challenge. Lindsey v. State, 259 Ga.App. 389, 577 S.E.2d 78 (2003). On remand, the trial court upheld
    the constitutionality of the law, and overruled the general demurrer. Pursuant to the trial court's grant of a motion for
    an out-of-time appeal, Lindsey appeals from that order.

    1. Statutory language is sufficiently definite to satisfy due process requirements so long as it has a commonly
    understood meaning. Rouse v. Dept. of Natural Resources, 271 Ga. 726, 729(2)(a), 524 S.E.2d 455 (1999). The
    "prohibition against excessive vagueness does not invalidate every statute which a reviewing court believes could
    have been drafted with greater precision. Many statutes will have some inherent vagueness for '[i]n most English
    words and phrases there lurk uncertainties.'... All the Due Process Clause requires is that the law give sufficient
    warning that men may conduct themselves so as to avoid that which is forbidden." [Cit.]

    Wilson v. State, 245 Ga. 49, 53(1), 262 S.E.2d 810 (1980). "In construing the constitutionality of a statute, we must
    examine it in its entire context." Bell v. State, 252 Ga. 267, 269(1), 313 S.E.2d 678 (1984). Thus, the exempted
    conduct referenced in subsection (d) of OCGA § 16-11-126 must be interpreted in pari materia with the conduct that
    is otherwise subject to prosecution for the offense of "carrying a concealed weapon."

    Under OCGA § 16-11-126(a), a weapon is unlawfully "concealed" on or about one's person unless it is exhibited "in
    an open manner and fully exposed to view." As thus defined, the crime of "carrying a concealed weapon" is clear
    and unambiguous. Simmons v. State, 262 Ga. 674, 424 S.E.2d 274 (1993). The obvious import of the provision is
    that persons must display their weapons so that those with whom they come in contact " 'might see that they were
    armed and dangerous persons, who were to be avoided in consequence.' [Cit.]" Moody v. State, 184 Ga.App. 768,
    769(1), 362 S.E.2d 499 (1987). Therefore, an armed person does not comply with the mandate of the statute unless
    his or her weapon is displayed so as to be visible to all observers. Marshall v. State, 129 Ga.App. 733(1), 200 S.E.2d
    902 (1973).

    Subsection (d) of OCGA § 16-11-126 differentiates the lawful act of "transporting" a firearm in a motor vehicle
    from the prohibited act of "concealing" it on or about one's person. Under that provision, it is permissible to
    transport a gun in an automobile so long as it is done "in an open manner and fully exposed to view or in the glove
    compartment, console, or similar compartment of the vehicle...." The phrase "in an open manner and fully exposed
    to view" tracks the unambiguous language of subsection (a). Thus, it is clearly permissible to carry a firearm in a car
    if it is openly exhibited to all on-lookers. Ross v. State, 255 Ga.App. 462, 463, 566 S.E.2d 47 (2002); Moody v.
    State, supra at 769(1), 362 S.E.2d 499.

    Lindsey urges, however, that the transport of a gun "in the glove compartment, console, or similar compartment" is
    unconstitutionally vague. Although the statute does not provide definitions for a "glove compartment" or the
    compartment located in the "console," each has a commonly understood meaning when used in reference to a motor
    vehicle. See generally Land v. State, 262 Ga. 898, 899(1), 426 S.E.2d 370 (1993).

    In order to transport a firearm in a compartment which is "similar" to them, the weapon must necessarily be located in an area of the automobile that is equipped with a lid or cover so as to be capable of enclosing its contents. If the concept of a "similar compartment" did not incorporate the requirement of an enclosing lid or cover, then a firearm could be placed in any open container in a vehicle, thereby giving an occupant ready access to it even if it were not exposed to the view of others. That would be completely contrary to the statutory purpose of making others aware of one's access to a weapon. The various provisions of a statute "should be viewed in harmony and in a manner which will not produce an unreasonable or absurd result. [Cits.]" Wickham v. State, 273 Ga. 563, 566, 544 S.E.2d 439 (2001). Logically, a
    limited authorization to "transport" guns in a vehicle cannot include the very "concealing" conduct which the general prohibition proscribes.

    Therefore, when the language of subsection (d) of OCGA § 16-11-126 is given its commonly understood meaning, it
    authorizes the transportation of a gun in an automobile so long as it either is fully exposed to the view of others or,
    in the alternative, is placed in the glove compartment, console, or in a similar closed compartment which is beyond
    the immediate access of the car's occupants. If the weapon is only exposed to the view of some or is not located in a
    closed compartment of the car, it is not being lawfully transported within the meaning of the statute. Instead, the
    firearm is being concealed on or about the person in violation of subsection (a) of OCGA § 16-11-126. "The amount
    of exposure of the weapon is not as important as the method in which the gun is carried. [Cit.]" Moody v. State,
    supra at 769(1), 362 S.E.2d 499. See also Ross v. State, supra. Accordingly, the trial court correctly overruled
    Lindsey's demurrer challenging the constitutionality of the statute for vagueness.

    2. Lindsey contends that the evidence does not authorize the guilty verdict. The State showed that he was the
    occupant of an automobile which contained a loaded pistol for which he could not produce a permit. The firearm
    was not being transported in the glove compartment, console or a similar closed compartment. Instead, it was in an
    open pocket located in a door of the vehicle, where it would be accessible to an occupant of the car, but would not
    be fully exposed to the view of others. Thus, the evidence is sufficient to authorize a rational trier of fact to find that
    Lindsey was guilty beyond a reasonable doubt of "carrying a concealed weapon" on or about his person in violation
    of OCGA § 16-11-126(a). Jackson v. Virginia, 443 U.S. 307, 99 S.Ct. 2781, 61 L.Ed.2d 560 (1979); Ross v. State,
    supra; Moody v. State, supra.

    Judgment affirmed.
    All the Justices concur.
    -

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtg452 View Post
    Unload it, put it in a case in the back of the SUV where it isn't accessible just like we have to when we pass through SC.
    In SC all you have to do is place it in the glove compartment or console. You do not have to unload it or put it in the back of the SUV. Doesn't matter if you have a permit or not. Glove box or console does not have to be locked and does not have to be in a case. Simply take it out of your holster in put it in the console. When you cross the state line place it back in your holster. Be sure you are at least 18 years old.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcox4freedom View Post
    NO!!!

    When I go through GA I take the mag out & clear the chamber of my PCW then I place them in my overnight bag in the "back" luggage compartment. (Where it stays until I get to the motel or out of the state.)

    If I'm not mistaken locking you firearm in the glovebox is considered "concealing" inside your car. (At least in the state of GA)

    GA is an OC state. But, (as far as I know), non-residents cannot legally OC in GA.
    Georgia law says you can have the loaded gun on your person, in a vehicle without a license. Georgia law also says it is illegal to open carry without a recognized license/permit. There is no disctinction between open carry and concealed carry in Georgia statute (except for loaded long guns):

    § 16-11-126. Having or carrying handguns, long guns, or other weapons; license requirement; exceptions for homes, motor vehicles, and other locations and conditions; penalties for violations


    (a) Any person who is not prohibited by law from possessing a handgun or long gun may have or carry on his or her person a weapon or long gun on his or her property or inside his or her home, motor vehicle, or place of business without a valid weapons carry license.

    (b) Any person who is not prohibited by law from possessing a handgun or long gun may have or carry on his or her person a long gun without a valid weapons carry license, provided that if the long gun is loaded, it shall only be carried in an open and fully exposed manner.

    (c) Any person who is not prohibited by law from possessing a handgun or long gun may have or carry any handgun provided that it is enclosed in a case and unloaded.

    (d) Any person who is not prohibited by law from possessing a handgun or long gun who is eligible for a weapons carry license may transport a handgun or long gun in any private passenger motor vehicle; provided, however, that private property owners or persons in legal control of property through a lease, rental agreement, licensing agreement, contract, or any other agreement to control access to such property shall have the right to forbid possession of a weapon or long gun on their property, except as provided in Code Section 16-11-135.

    (e) Any person licensed to carry a handgun or weapon in any other state whose laws recognize and give effect to a license issued pursuant to this part shall be authorized to carry a weapon in this state, but only while the licensee is not a resident of this state; provided, however, that such licensee shall carry the weapon in compliance with the laws of this state.

    (f) Any person with a valid hunting or fishing license on his or her person, or any person not required by law to have a hunting or fishing license, who is engaged in legal hunting, fishing, or sport shooting when the person has the permission of the owner of the land on which the activities are being conducted may have or carry on his or her person a handgun or long gun without a valid weapons carry license while hunting, fishing, or engaging in sport shooting.

    (g) Notwithstanding Code Sections 12-3-10, 27-3-1.1, 27-3-6, and 16-12-122 through 16-12-127, any person with a valid weapons carry license may carry a weapon in all parks, historic sites, or recreational areas, as such term is defined in Code Section 12-3-10, including all publicly owned buildings located in such parks, historic sites, and recreational areas, in wildlife management areas, and on public transportation; provided, however, that a person shall not carry a handgun into a place where it is prohibited by federal law.

    (h) (1) No person shall carry a weapon without a valid weapons carry license unless he or she meets one of the exceptions to having such license as provided in subsections (a) through (g) of this Code section.

    (2) A person commits the offense of carrying a weapon without a license when he or she violates the provisions of paragraph (1) of this subsection.
    It would appear as if the new version of this Georgia statute only allows the handgun to be carried on the person in a motor vehicle without a license, though. There is no distinction between open carry and concealed carry.
    Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman. Amerika: a place where the serfs are afraid of the action the police may take against them for perfectly legal behavior.

  7. #17
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    I swear, nothing against you peach state folks.....but those laws are some of the most contradicting things I've ever read. To me, it looks like if I carry on my person, in my vehicle, even though GA doesn't recognize my SC permit, I'm within the framework of the law. Anyone believe otherwise.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by nca_mm View Post
    I swear, nothing against you peach state folks.....but those laws are some of the most contradicting things I've ever read. To me, it looks like if I carry on my person, in my vehicle, even though GA doesn't recognize my SC permit, I'm within the framework of the law. Anyone believe otherwise.
    That's the way I read it. And, according to paragraph (c) above, the other method of carrying your handgun is simply unloaded and in a case. It does not require the case to be locked.
    Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman. Amerika: a place where the serfs are afraid of the action the police may take against them for perfectly legal behavior.

  9. #19
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    Default myrtle beach

    Headed to myrtle beach in a few weeks. Sc honor my KY CCDW permit & I've researched sc law so I'll be carrying except when on the beach getting cooked lol.
    If it doesn't fit, FORCE it! If it breaks then it needed to be replaced anyway.


  10. #20
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    thank you. was reading for another question, but this post is really helpful.

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