Preventing Lead Poisoning On The Shooting Range
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Preventing Lead Poisoning On The Shooting Range

This is a discussion on Preventing Lead Poisoning On The Shooting Range within the Women & Guns forums, part of the Main Category category; Preventing Lead Poisoning On The Shooting Range Little do you know, but this insidious heavy metal found in ranges everywhere ...

  1. #1
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    Default Preventing Lead Poisoning On The Shooting Range

    Preventing Lead Poisoning On The Shooting Range


    Little do you know, but this insidious heavy metal found in ranges everywhere may be slowly killing you.
    -By Wm. Lane M. Robson, MD
    Dr. Lane Robson is the Director of Pediatric Nephrology at The Children's Hospital, Greenville Hospital System, Greenville, South Carolina. He is a member of The Greenville Gun Club and enjoys bullseye shooting with his .45.
    I was about eleven years old when I first heard about lead poisoning.
    My dad and I were pouring lead to serve as the nose cone for a rocket we were making. While we were heating the lead, my Dad remarked that we needed to be careful to avoid lead poisoning. Like many know-it-all adolescents I responded, "Don't be silly, Dad. The only way to get lead poisoning is to get shot." My Dad only smiled, but why shouldn't I have thought that? I grew up watching one Western after another on television, and I'd heard more than one gunslinger remark after a shoot-out, "He died of lead poisoning."
    My Dad was right to be concerned about the potential health hazard-and that was in the 1960s when the health risks associated with lead poisoning were only beginning to be appreciated. In the last thirty years, lead poisoning has emerged as a significant national health problem. In 1992, the Office of Management and Budget allocated $41 million for lead-screening programs. Despite these programs, few of the estimated 800,000 Americans who enjoy competitive shooting are aware of the health risk posed by lead.
    Brief Overview of Lead
    Lead is the heaviest and softest of the common metals. The United States mines more lead than any other country, most of it in the state of Missouri. The United States also refines more lead than any other country and consumes about 22 percent of the world's production of refined lead. Most of the lead produced today is used in electric storage batteries. Other uses include leaded glass, protective coverings for electrical cables, some paint pigments and cosmetics, lead-glazed ceramics, and, of course, bullets.

    for the rest of this interesting article and great source of other related information please click the link below


    Preventing Lead Poisoning On The Shooting Range

    Little do you know, but this insidious heavy metal found in ranges everywhere may be slowly killing you.
    -By Wm. Lane M. Robson, MD
    Dr. Lane Robson is the Director of Pediatric Nephrology at The Children's Hospital, Greenville Hospital System, Greenville, South Carolina. He is a member of The Greenville Gun Club and enjoys bullseye shooting with his .45.
    I was about eleven years old when I first heard about lead poisoning.
    My dad and I were pouring lead to serve as the nose cone for a rocket we were making. While we were heating the lead, my Dad remarked that we needed to be careful to avoid lead poisoning. Like many know-it-all adolescents I responded, "Don't be silly, Dad. The only way to get lead poisoning is to get shot." My Dad only smiled, but why shouldn't I have thought that? I grew up watching one Western after another on television, and I'd heard more than one gunslinger remark after a shoot-out, "He died of lead poisoning."
    My Dad was right to be concerned about the potential health hazard-and that was in the 1960s when the health risks associated with lead poisoning were only beginning to be appreciated. In the last thirty years, lead poisoning has emerged as a significant national health problem. In 1992, the Office of Management and Budget allocated $41 million for lead-screening programs. Despite these programs, few of the estimated 800,000 Americans who enjoy competitive shooting are aware of the health risk posed by lead.


    for the rest of this interesting article and much more useful information for women , and men, too click the link below

    Lead & The Shooting Range
    gun control is being able to hit your target

  2. #2
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    This is a great share and some great advice for anyone who shoots. Lead poisoning can cause some significant damage and its very preventable.
    Kevin - NRA Life Member
    2nd Amendment = Freedom from Tyranny

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    it's something many don't even consider whilst handling guns and lead laden materials. is why i posted it. there is alot of other great info on that page too esp helpful to me being new to carrying........
    gun control is being able to hit your target

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    Nightmare45 is offline NRA LIFE MEMBER
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    For my own information is lead a naturally occurring substance???

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    I have been handling firearms and ammo almost daily for 20+ years. My brothers son who's grandfather has a indoor range in his basement had one of the relatives get sick and after testing found out he had high levels of lead from shooting in a confined space all the folks where tested and most who used it also had high levels. I shoot vastly more then any of them ever did but I shoot outdoors. I also handle allot of ammo. I had myself tested and the level of lead in my system was below average. Shooting on a outdoor range is very safe as far a s lead goes. The #1 shooter related lead issues are casting indoors without adequate ventilation the same for indoor shooting. My grandsons other grandfather has had a company come in and rework the system in his range and the system he has now moves 11 times more air then the last system.

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    I've known of firearm instructors who have had lead poisoning from being on outdoor ranges as well.

    Best advice, be careful and wash your hands and face with cold water after every shoot. The hot water opens your pores, so use cold.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

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    I personally know two range instructors that had high lead poisoning.
    Because of them, I wear rubber gloves when reloading.
    My indoor range requires lead nose bullets and like the report said, primers are full of lead.
    I know a couple of guys that wear the rubber gloves when shooting. (particularly revolvers)
    I may give that a try someday.

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    There is a wipe out there call d-wipes. We use them at work for removing lead from our work areas. Right on the bottle it says for uses as shooting sports, they look like baby wipes and work great. We do test for lead all the time and these remove all traces of it. You should be able to find them online.

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    under Recommendations at the end of the page Lead & The Shooting Range

    Have your blood lead checked if you shoot on a weekly basis, if you shoot or reload more than 500 rounds a month, or if you develop any symptoms of lead poisoning.

  10. #10
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    Use this diligently D-Lead Hand Soap

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