Lone Wolf Glock Conversion Barrels

11
Shares
Share on Pinterest
Share with your friends










Submit
More share buttons

Lone Wolf Distributors of Oldtown, Idaho has enabled the Glock Models 22 & 27 (and others) to become even more versatile and valuable. A strong statement that some may not agree with. Let me first state that in my lifetime of using and carrying handguns, I had never believed that I would own a Glock or any other Polymer Pistol. I liked the permanence of Steel!

I bought my Generation 3 Glock 22 from J&G Sales in Arizona. It was a Police trade-in and it was billed as being in “Very Good + to Excellent” condition. When the Gunsmith/Dealer that I utilized to make the transfer received the pistol, I had him check it out for me to ensure that it was safe, and in the condition advertised. The pistol looked like it was almost in
“Like New” condition. There was no holster wear, blemishes or faults found in or on the pistol. The gunsmith confirmed my thoughts, saying the pistol was indeed “Like New” and very sound.

I like the Glock! Never thought I’d say that… It feels right in my hand and I can still carry the big pistol concealed. I have practiced with it every weekend for 6 months, and it is as easy to shoot as any of my revolvers. The .40 S&W cartridges get to be a little pricey for just shooting on the range, and I was looking for a good alternative, but I did not want to invest into a Glock 17 just for practice purposes. One thing about the Glock that I did not like was that the Guide Rod was Plastic. With the beating that it takes and the heat build up on the barrel during a sustained firing sessions, I decided to opt for a Stainless Steel Guide Rod with a Captured Flat Spring. I got the one offered by Lone Wolf Distributing.

That is where Lone Wolf Distributors (LWD) became known to me. I purchased their Guide Rod and Glock Grip Plug to close the gap in the pistol grip and noticed that they had conversion barrels for the Glock 22 and others. The conversion barrel is available in several configurations, in 9 mm (9 x 19) and .357 Sig, standard barrel length, barrels with compensators and barrels with threads for silencers. I ordered my conversion barrel in standard length 9mm since the ammo is more readily available than the .357 Sig and would afford a less expensive way to train with my G-22. When I received my barrel, I found a conventionally rifled bore, not the polygonal bore that Glock uses, so that was a plus, in that I could use lead bullets in the Glock safely, if I chose to do so. The barrel also had the Lone Wolf logo etched onto the top of the barrel along with the numbers 40-9, which would serve as a good reminder as to which barrel that I had installed in my Glock. You can also get the barrel without etching. The barrel was noted as being a “Match Grade” barrel so my expectations were high on improved accuracy. LWD said that no ‘fitting’ or gunsmithing is needed, that their conversion barrel was “Ready to use, pre-fit drop in…” Upon inspection I found that the feed ramp was highly polished, which the Glock should have had all along. I cleaned the barrel with Break Free LCP, installed the barrel and loaded up 6 magazines that I purchased on-line at CDNN.com. I bought 3 Glock 17 OEM mags and 3 KCI G17 mags. It is nice that Glock has standardized the size of their frames and magazines. Ammo used was standard Winchester White Box 115 g. FMJ 9 mm. The conversion barrel did fit nicely, and the barrel walls were thicker in order to maintain the .40 S&W outside dimensions.

On my range, I set my targets at 10 yards. I expected to not have maximum accuracy until the barrel had at least 200 rounds through it. I was pleasantly surprised that the accuracy and function of the LWD Conversion Barrel in the G22 was exceptional. To make the testing come out in even mag loads, I shot 204 rounds of 9 mm (12 Mags). I had absolutely no problems with the Glock. Not one Failure To Feed (FTF) or Failure To Eject (FTE) in this test of the LWD Conversion Barrels (or in shooting the .40 S&W ammo beforehand). The Glock is very reliable, and now, thanks to Lone Wolf, is much more accurate.

When I started shooting from a sandbag rest, the 1st target and mag showed a nominal group spread of 5″ (see figure 1) and pretty much stayed that way through about 8 mags. At that point, I noticed that the groups were starting to tighten up and I was getting several targets (I shot 1 Target for each mag of 17 rounds) that had a multiple round ragged hole (see figure 2). In effect, the conversion barrel has given me another Glock to shoot at a very reduced price. This is a win-win option for anyone who owns a G22. The groupings with the LWD Conversion Barrel are much tighter than those of the OEM Glock Barrel in .40 S&W. The barrel thickness on the Conversion Barrel is a thicker wall with very sharp and clean rifling (See figure 3), and the Lone Wolf etching on the top of the barrel chamber is clear to see. Lone Wolf Distributing has a definite winner in the 9 mm Conversion Barrel. I may just try out the .357 Sig barrel conversion… It uses the same .40 S&W magazines since the .357 Sig is a necked down .40 S&W! Also in figure 3 you can see the comparison of the original Glock Barrel and the Lone Wolf 9 mm barrel, and the new Stainless Steel Guide Rod. The pistol actually seems to function better with the all steel guide rod. Casing inspection did not show the ‘Glock Swell’ due to a loose and unsupported chamber, which is good news for those who want to reload their spent cartridge cases. I may even look into getting a new .40 S&W barrel for the Glock, as I am impressed with the accuracy from the Lone Wolf Barrels!

Lone Wolf Glock Conversion Barrels

Lone Wolf Glock Conversion Barrels

Lone Wolf Glock Conversion Barrels

Lone Wolf Glock Conversion Barrels

The following information is taken from the Lone Wolf Distributors website:

Lone Wolf Distributors match grade replacement barrels are manufactured from the highest grade mill select 416 stainless forgings. CNC machined and heat treated, providing a life time of service and unparalleled accuracy at an affordable price. The standard groove and land rifling make this an excellent choice for those who wish to shoot lead, plated or jacketed bullets. Intended for use in the Glock 22,31 only. We do recommend you use the correct 9mm magazine with these conversion barrels to guarantee reliable feeding. Use G17 9mm mag for G22, G24, G31 and G35 conversion.
Special features include:

  • Ready to use, pre-fit drop in. No gunsmithing required.
  • Precision machined from heat treated 416R stainless forgings.
  • Oversized lock-up area produces greater shot-to-shot accuracy.
  • Tighter dimensions than the original.
  • Polished feed ramp and bore, diamond turned exterior
  • Maximum chamber support, improved feed ramp design.
  • Match grade broach cut rifling and target crown.
  • Ok to use lead, plated or jacketed bullets.
  • Lifetime warranty.

Lone Wolf Distributors will replace any of our barrels or barrel accessories which are found to have manufacturing or material defects. Customer modifications or the use of reloaded ammunition will void this warranty.

Lone Wolf Distributors Inc.
57 Shepard Road
P.O. Box 3549
Oldtown, ID 83822-3549
Telephone/Fax:
Phone: 208-437-0612
Fax: 888-279-2077
http://www.lonewolfdist.com

LWD SS Guide Rod
[LWD-GRA1722 $24.95]
LWD Glock Grip Plug
[LWD M/Plug17 $6.95]
LWD Conversion Barrel
[LWD-229N $109.95]

Olin / Winchester
East Alton, IL

TruGlo Brite-Site
www.truglo.com

GLOCK, Inc.
6000 Highlands Parkway
Smyrna, GA 30082
USA
Telephone/Fax:
Phone: 770-432-1202
Fax: 770-433-8719
http://www.glock.com

Pachmayr Grips
www.pachmayr.com

[All Trademark &, Copyrights Respected and are the Property of their Respective Owners]

Disclaimer: All of the products, parts and ammunition were purchased at the regular market prices by the reviewer. Nothing was provided to the reviewer by any of the manufacturers or distributors or the publisher of this review. The idea and concept for this review was conceived by the reviewer, and the comments and opinions are those of the reviewer and the reviewer alone.

By – John P. Kirkpatrick
USA Carry Member
NRA Life Member
California Rifle & Pistol Association, Life Member
Handgun Club of America Member
United States Concealed Carry Association Member
Oath Keepers, Charter Member

About the reviewer: John is an Air Force Retiree with over 20 years of Active Duty Service, having been in Viet Nam in ’69-’70, and Southwest Asia ’84-’89. He is a former Law Enforcement Officer having served as Chief Deputy Sheriff with the Carter County, Missouri Sheriff’s Department, and Reserve Officer for small rural Police Departments in Carter County, Missouri. John is now fully retired from Pitney Bowes, Inc. and lives on a small farm in Southern Missouri’s Ozark Foothills region, enjoys his private shooting range and retirement.

11
Shares
Share on Pinterest
Share with your friends










Submit
More share buttons

, , , , , , ,

  • Wildbill70

    I might concider doing the same if they make one for a glock 27.

    • JPKirkpatrick

      See the above two comments…
      They do have them for the G27, and they work just fine!

  • Anonymous

    Yes, they make it for the Glock 27 and other models. You can see them all here:

    http://www.lonewolfdist.com/Products.aspx?CAT=241

  • Baker Bret

    I think this review is spot on. I bought a LW 40-9 conversion for my Glock 23 and a stainless guide rod and it has functioned flawlessly for 500 rounds (since I got it). It’s has been a great buy and I’m tough to please.

  • Anonymous

    @0bb41e550c24cd01cd32fc0337f455bc:disqus ; I liked the performance of the 9mm barrel so much that I bought another barrel in .40 S&W, just to try it out. It performed a bit better than the original Glock barrel that came with my G22! Now, my G22 was purchased used, as a Police Trade In and my Armorer/Gunsmith friend that checked it out for me said that the pistol looked to be ‘Almost NIB’ with no discernible wear to be found, other than a little ‘smoothing’ on the trigger guard and slight ‘polishing’ on the front corners of the slide, so I would have presumed that the pistol had not been shot much (bought it through J&G Sales). The Lone Wolf Match Barrels just are awesome!

    Now, with the investment that I have in this one Glock; 2 LW Barrel’s; 2 Sets of Mags; Manual Safety Kit; Tru-Glo Fibre Sights; all total: $850, I don’t plan of getting rid of it, for several reasons… It fits my hands, it is spot-on accurate, I have two calibers that I can train with in one pistol, and IT IS UTTERLY RELIABLE, and ABSOLUTELY SAFE!

    (That last comment should stir up the cesspool comments about Glocks and Manual Safeties)

  • Sarah_wescott

    how do i get the bullet out of the chamber of a ruger  p95dc

    • JPKirkpatrick

      Sarah, even though this is “Off Topic”, your question is important enough to be civil about it all…;>)
      ####################################################################
      You might be better off taking it to a gunsmith to have him remove the bullet from the barrel.  I have had an occasion to remove an overly long bullet from being jammed into the rifling of the barrel and followed procedure #2, after rendering the primer inert with an over night soaking in Hoppe’s #9 solvent.  You have to be very careful, because you really want to be cognizant of the fact that the cartridge could fire while tapping on the bullet.
      ####################################################################

      1.  I presume that you have fired a cartridge, and for some reason (being a squib load?) it got stuck in the barrel without exiting, or;
      2.  The cartridge being loaded into the chamber was ‘Overly long’ and the bullet is jammed into the rifling of the barrel.
      It is essential that you remove the magazine before trying to work on your pistol, so please make sure that it is UNLOADED!

      If it is “1.”, then ensure it is unloaded and disassemble the pistol to remove the barrel from the pistol.  Put a little ‘RemOil’ (or other lubricating oil) from the chamber end, and using a wooden dowel, from the muzzle end, tap it back to exiting from the chamber.  If this does not work for you take it to a reputable gunsmith to have him remove it.

      If it is “2.”, then you need to be very careful, soak some Hoppe’s #9 onto the primer end of the cartridge to try and render it inert and safer to work on, and after some time soaking it with the cleaner, being very careful, gently tap the bullet from the muzzle end using a wooden dowel and after a few gentle raps on the dowel, the bullet should drop out.

      ####################################################################

      You might be better off taking it to a gunsmith to have him remove the
      bullet from the barrel.  I have had an occasion to remove an overly long
      bullet from being jammed into the rifling of the barrel and followed
      procedure #2, after rendering the primer inert with an over night
      soaking in Hoppe’s #9 solvent.  You have to be very careful, because you
      really want to be cognizant of the fact that the cartridge could fire
      while tapping on the bullet.

      ####################################################################

      Good luck, and really, consider taking it to a gunshop to have it removed, it is dangerous to be working from the muzzle end with a live shell stuck in the chamber!

  • Nathan

    Outstanding review, thanks for the effort to give it to us. I laughed when I read that you used WWB ammo, I was expecting a horror story of malfunctions. 
    “About 1% of our 9mm conversion barrels are affected by the poor performance of low powered 115 grain ammunition causing a Failure To Eject (FTE). A good example of ammunition that is “most likely to fail” is Winchester White Box (WWB). This rare failure is too low a percentage to make an issue, however it is one we are well aware of.”
    -LWD Website.

    That gives me great pause and a huge lack of confidence. They will NOT replace the defective barrel, which as they state its such a “rare” problem, im not sure why they wouldn’t just replace the barrel for the customer. I dont feel like dropping the money on a barrel that might have a chance of being a dud and the company wont stand behind that product. Although after reading your review im reconsidering purchasing from LWD. I currently use my Glock 23 exclusively and im really looking to cut down on ammo costs. 40SW is killing my wallet, I can get 9mm for half the price…..

  • http://www.facebook.com/alan.murdock Alan Murdock

    A friend and I tested out the Lone Wolf Distributors upper for the 10mm Glock last weekend. An amazing gun. You can see our experience online at tp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgFWOoO_OKI

Quantcast