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Point Shooting & Concealed Carry Drills

Point Shooting & Concealed Carry Drills

Point Shooting & Concealed Carry Drills

The purpose of this drill is the development of point shooting skills. Point shooting is best described as the shooter bringing their pistol up to eye level, with both eyes open point their pistol at the desired target and shoot. Point shooting is generally used from 0 to 7 yards, while for some shooters it is possible to hit targets out to 10 yards or more using this method of shooting.

This training drill is set up to be done without a time limit. The drill requires a minimum of 18 rounds.  If a shooter wants to use a stop watch or shot timer to gauge their own speeds this could be done, but is not required. The target I suggest using is a full size silhouette.

Safety Considerations with Movement:

The lateral movement in this drill is described as taking a step laterally to the side. This would be as if you were stepping to the side to allow a person to go past you. While firing portions of this drill where lateral movement is called for, the shooter shall remain facing the berm. If you are moving with your pistol drawn, it is required you keep it pointed down range.

When getting ready to practice this drill, it is recommended you first practice the movement phase with a dummy gun or training pistol. This dry practice should be done until you are comfortable with the movement phase. When you are ready, you could move onto using your pistol and live ammo. I cannot emphasize enough if you are having troubles during dry practice, you should not move onto live fire, but seek out a certified instructor for assistance.

Points to remember when practicing: 

  • Start out slow, speed will come with time and practice.
  • Concentrate of forming a good grip on your pistol each time.
  • Practice your draw stroke the same way each time.
  • Bring your pistol to eye level with both eyes open when firing.
  • Practice lateral movements prior to live fire exercises with a training pistol or dummy gun.
  • During the lateral movements, the shooter shall remain facing the berm with unholstered pistols pointing down range.

First stage of fire: 

Starting position will be facing the target 5 yards away, with the pistol being holstered and concealed.

1st string – On the signal to fire, the shooter will draw from concealment and engage the target with two rounds.

2nd string – On the signal to fire, the shooter will draw from concealment and engage the target with two rounds.

3rd string – On the signal to fire, the shooter will draw from concealment and engage the target with three rounds.

Second stage of fire:

Starting position will be facing the target 5 yards away with the pistol being holstered and concealed.

1st string – During this sting of fire, the shooter will take one step to the left. During the lateral movement, the shooter shall remain facing the berm. On the signal to fire, the shooter will draw from concealment and engage the target with two rounds.

2nd string – During this sting of fire, the shooter will take one step to the left. During the lateral movement, the shooter shall remain facing the berm. On the signal to fire, the shooter will draw from concealment and engage the target with two rounds.

3rd string – During this sting of fire, the shooter will take one step to the left. During the lateral movement, the shooter shall remain facing the berm. On the signal to fire, the shooter will draw from concealment and engage the target with three rounds.

Third stage of fire:

Starting position will be facing the target 5 yards away with the pistol being holstered and concealed.

1st string – During this sting of fire, the shooter will take one step to the right. During the lateral movement, the shooter shall remain facing the berm. On the signal to fire, the shooter will draw from concealment and engage the target with two rounds.

2nd string – During this sting of fire, the shooter will take one step to the right. During the lateral movement, the shooter shall remain facing the berm. On the signal to fire, the shooter will draw from concealment and engage the target with two rounds.

3rd string – During this sting of fire, the shooter will take one step to the right. During the lateral movement, the shooter shall remain facing the berm. On the signal to fire, the shooter will draw from concealment and engage the target with three rounds.

Disclaimer:

It is important to remember shooting drills with movement can be dangerous. If shooters have doubts about their physical capabilities or shooting skill levels and you want to integrate movement into a shooting drill, I recommend you seek out an instructor for professional training before attempting any shooting drill with movement on your own.

Shooters who choose to practice this drill are encouraged to check with their local range rules to ensure this drill does not violate any of their local range rules. Shooters who choose to practice this drill assume all liability for any injuries that could occur during this concealed carry drill.

View the other articles in this series:
Concealed Carry Drill Part Three
Concealed Carry Drill Part Two

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  • http://www.facebook.com/matt.schlueter.79 Matt Schlueter

    Please visit Schlueter Firearms Instruction on Facebook, and look at the simple instructions for building a frame to hold targets or use as a simulated barricade.
    Matt

  • http://www.facebook.com/skip.lemay Skip LeMay

    Matt, is the intention here to move , draw, shoot? Or is it to draw, move, shoot? Or is it to draw while moving, stop, and shoot?
    Whichever way it is it is a great drill.

    • http://www.facebook.com/matt.schlueter.79 Matt Schlueter

      Skip, the movement can vary some what but it would be taught in one of my courses as draw while moving, stop and shoot. However more experienced shooters will find it is possible to fire while completing the movement and still hit center-mass. Also keep watching as there will be another article bringing up additional stages of fire for this drill. For those who have not looked at Schlueter Firearms Instruction on Facebook, take a look at the picture and directions for the frame which can be used as a targets, or for simulated barricade in training drills.

  • Gordon Shumway

    Isn’t it amazing that a disclaimer is necessary?

    • http://www.facebook.com/matt.schlueter.79 Matt Schlueter

      The disclaimer is a necessary evil I’m afraid in today’s world, unfortunately.

  • Joe Hayles

    Matt, is this drill for a laser sight, without or either?

    • http://www.facebook.com/matt.schlueter.79 Matt Schlueter

      It was designed with out a laser sight, but you may use one if you want. However point shooting was not intended for sighted fire, which in my opinion a laser would be sighted fire.

      • http://www.facebook.com/matt.schlueter.79 Matt Schlueter

        Forgot to add, if a student in one of my courses did have a laser I would not prevent them from using it. However I would explain the purpose of the drill is learning to point shoot with out the aid of sighting systems.

  • Larry Berry

    I did not read anything about looking at the front sight . If Mr. Schlueter means not to look at the sights, he is wrong , no matter what his resume says .

    • http://www.facebook.com/matt.schlueter.79 Matt Schlueter

      Larry Berry,

      Quote “Principles
      of Combat training. By proper training at combat ranges, man-killing accuracy,
      without the use of sights and with extreme speed, can be acquired by the
      average soldier or police officer. This can be done in less time, and with less
      expenditure of ammunition, than is required to become even a fair target shot.”
      Source Kill or Get Killed by Lt. Col. Rex Applegate (Ret.)

      First let me say this, the article is about Point Shooting, not Close Quarters Precision Shooting.

      Second I do not claim to be an expert in all
      things shooting, and continue to learn new things all the time regarding shooting and instructing shooters. You may be surprised by the fact I even learn things from new shooters based on the observations they make.

      Third if you can not find some usefulness out of an article on a shooting drill, then it is unlikely you would be able to find the benefit of attending anyone’s training course regardless of who the instructor is. I fear you would find fault with them, as you would know better than they would.

      I quoted one of my sources above on
      point shooting, if you would like you can locate his book on your own and read
      it for your self.

      YMMV
      Matt

  • Larry Berry

    Mr. Schlueter has hi reply to my email below my comments. I replied to his reply . Would you please put my reply up on this site. Thank you , Larry Berry

  • Larry Berry

    I went to Gunsite when Jeff Cooper was active in training and owned it. For the 250 course he was on the range every day. Never once did he say to bring the gun to eye level and shoot. He and other noted instructors said to bring to eye level and concentrate on the front sight . I don’t pretend to be a firearms instructor, but I did go to the Gunsite provost course under Mr. Cooper.. Unsighted shooting at 5 or 7 yards was not mentioned . I took the 499 course , unsighted shooting at the above ranges was not taught there, It was the opposite as stated above. Not trying to be a name dropper, Bill Jeans, Dennis Tueller were also my instructors for the above courses. Quite frankly sir , I am tired of people teaching these things wrong. I would suggest you take a firearms course from Gunsite, Thunder ranch , or Yavapi Firearms Academy and heed what they say.

  • http://www.facebook.com/matt.schlueter.79 Matt Schlueter

    Larry,

    I am not going to give you any of the names of the people
    who I have attended courses with or received training from. You seem intent on
    arguing about how what you received was better, because of the big name
    instructors you received training from. Even going to the extent to tell me
    where I should attend training and what instructors to seek out, furthering my
    belief you are just attempting to continue to troll for a fight.

    The truth is when talking about instructors every one has
    their own style and method of teaching. For this very reason I am not critical
    of what other firearms instructors teach unless there are obvious safety
    concerns. When partaking in the learning process of the shooting world, it is
    important to remember no one is an expert to the point they can not continue to
    learn and develop their shooting and teaching skills. With my initial response
    I identified what you’re were referring to “CLOSE
    QUARTERS PRESCISION SHOOTING” went onto cite
    one of my sources for the article, restated what the article was about “POINT
    SHOOTING” and why it is important to those who wish to enhance their current
    skills on defensive shooting, or develop the skills needed for defensive
    shooting.

    While you are claiming a
    person who is practicing point shooting should concentrate on the front sight.
    I ask: why would you concentrate on the front sight?

    By concentrating on the
    closer front sight it may cause further limitations on your vision when you could
    be suffering from the effects of tunnel vision?

    In actual shootings they have
    found Law enforcement Officers do not aim when presented with sudden attacks
    that are within ranges associated with point shooting.

    What I find interesting is it
    took studies from the 1990’s to present to figure this out.

    Even more interesting is if
    people had paid attention to the instructors like “Rex Applegate” and others of
    his time period this would not have had to be rediscovered, but only confirmed
    and supported.

    Point Shooting is for
    responding to sudden attacks where the shooter is being attacked with deadly force;
    it is best described as such below:

    Point Shooting-

    Point shooting is
    generally from 3 to 7 yards. The generally recommended method would be defined
    as follows:

    Gun is held at line of
    sight. Shooter’s focus is on the threat, or a specific visual target point on
    the threat (of which eye/hand coordination is maximized).

    Focus is not on the
    sights, it is very possible that application of such point shooting is often
    found to be successful for one or both of the following reasons:

    Muscle memory from
    continuous sighted, daylight shooting that performs the task to proficiency.

    The shooter may not have
    fine alignment of the sights but nevertheless his eye and mind, senses the
    presence of the gun to their front and indexes this based on the eye and hand
    coordination to point and aim the gun. This is a basic form of aimed fire where
    the shooter may or
    may not use
    the sights. For any situation where the gun is not to be held at eye level,
    then the shooter should revert to one of the extreme close quarters shooting
    techniques.

    For your benefit I have
    included what Close Quarters Precision Shooting is see below:

    Close quarters precision
    Shooting-

    “Close quarters precision
    shooting is used for ranges from 1-25 yards. This method generally applies
    beyond contact and extreme close quarters methods where there is time, ability,
    and necessity to do so. This is precision shooting on demand, under possibly
    high stress and to immediately incapacitate a threat(s). This method can also
    be utilized at closer ranges where the suspect is partially exposed while cover
    protects the rest of their body, or in close proximity to non-hostile persons,
    or while suspect is on the move.

    The body positioning is
    exactly the same as the point shooting with the difference being the sights are
    the focus.

    Practice of precision
    shooting under realistic circumstances and at realistic targetry can help the
    shooters capability in two additional areas of continuum-point shooting and
    extended distance may relate, the three elements that must be present are:

    Holding the gun at eye level
    between the dominant eye and the threat.

    Trigger resetting.

    Firm grip.”

    I appreciate all of your
    comments and hope I have clarified what point shooting is and is not!

    Please note for the purposes
    of my drill I chose 5 yards, however you could adjust the distance to one of your
    own choosing

    “Your Mileage May Vary”

    YMMV

    Matt

  • Larry Berry

    I am not looking for a fight. These discussions we are having is the first time I have emailed anyone more than twice in a disagreeing discussion. I went on your website and I don’t think you have very much training judging from what you put down as qualifications. I would like to know if you would name one known firearms trainer that teaches what you do in the 2 articles that you have listed on this site. All the better known trainers can trace their lineage directly to Jeff Cooper and Gunsite. That would include all the people and training facilities that I mentioned. I think you thought this training up yourself. My point being , no one listed in the names and training facilities trains what you have in these 2 articles. I say again , you are telling people wrong. Larry Berry

  • http://www.facebook.com/matt.schlueter.79 Matt Schlueter

    Quote: “It’s an axiom that hitting your target is your main concern, and the
    best way to hit is to use your sights, but circumstances do arise in
    which the need for speed is so great, and the range so short, that you
    must hit by pointing alone, without seeing your gun at all.

    Pointer fire is not as hard to learn as sighting, once you realize it’s
    range limitations. using the 1911 auto-pistol I have found that I can
    teach the average infantryman to stay on a silhouette at 10 yards –
    using pointer fire in two shot bursts – more easily that I can get him
    into that 25 yard bullseye using slow fire and sights.

    Of course this sort of shooting is strictly a way of obtaining body hits
    at essentially indoor ranges ( 30 feet and under) …. But up close
    pointer fire can be murderously effective, and it’s mastery is often the
    difference between life and death.”

    – Fighting Handguns, pages 97-98 Author Jeff Cooper

    Please note the comment on 30 feet or less, aka 10yards or less

    I have read the book by Jeff Cooper, and he addressed what I have been writing about regarding point shooting as a skill for defensive pistol shooting. I also realize as part of his teaching method he did emphasize on sighted two handed shooting.

    Where as Rex Applegate, William Fairbairn, and Eric Sykes promoted pistol combat shooting, and yes they included point shooting, along with sighted shooting for precision combat shooting as well.

    If your interested William Fairbairn and Eric Sykes wrote: Shooting to Live, published in 1942, is considered by many to be the classic text of pistol combat, and one of the best codifications of the high-stress point shooting method.

    Also I do not know any pistol instructors that do not teach point shooting in one form or another, even the NRA incorporates Point Shooting into there defensive shooting courses….So your entitled to your opinion, as any thing I say will not change it. Nor will I engage in saying I attended training with this instructor or that instructor in a continuation of this petty exchange with you. Which quite frankly seems to be your big hang up about me.

    In closing I’m not sure what you learned in your alleged attendance of those courses, or if you ever attended any of the training courses you indicate you did.

    regards

    • Larry Berry

      Later when Jeff started teaching at Gunsite he did not stress point shooting. Through I.P.S.C., observing and doing he found out using the sights were best. I see where you used the word ” alleged ” in my attendance at these courses. If you will post on this site that I am telling the truth, I will send you my certificates signed by Mr. Cooper. You mentioned Mr. Rex Applegate’s book, I have had a copy since 1988. If you want to mention books, I have quite an extensive library of defensive books. Starters would be books by Louis Awerbuck, Chuck Taylor, Gabe Suarez,. John Farnam, the late Jim Cirillo , Gargantuan Gunsite Gossip 1,2 and 3 ( quite often Jeff would mention defensive shooting in these ) and Jeff Cooper’s Defensive Pistolcraft tapes ( there are four ) .Not one of these books ( no counting Mr,Applegate’s book , I don’t know for sure about the 7 yard point shooting .in his book ,it has been a while since I read it) has anything about point shooting at 7 to 10 yards. Every one of these books stressed the front sight. The books I received at Gunsite for the 250 and provost course did not mention point shooting at 7 to 10 yards either. I knew Mr. Cooper pretty well , well enough that he knew me by face and name and he sure did not mention point shooting when a group of us were talking about the defensive use of pistol . He always stressed the “flash sight picture” When people see these articles on a website like this they take it for granite that it is good training . Seems to me they would be better off being taught things like flash sight picture , Principles of Personal Defense, awareness color code, D.V.C., five elements of the modern technique and it goes on and on . That would serve the people reading your article much better than some obscure way to hit a target at 7 to 10 yards. I know my subject matter sir. Upon request I can give you names of people that had to shoot to defend themselves and they used their front sight .

      • Larry Berry

        The American Pistol Institute, API General Pistol Course, Student Notebook, page 5 paragraph 5
        So why use the sights? Well, it is the use of the sights which programs the reflex of aligning the weapon with the target. Once accomplished we do not discard the ” training wheels “since the sights are used to confirm that alignment exists. In addition, if one doesn’t use the sights one soon finds oneself “point shooting” and that has proven itself to be unacceptable as a combat technique.

  • Jennifer Barr

    good article

  • American Soldier

    This is in reference to Mr. Barry. First off, the articles by Mr. Schlueter are for drills for anyone from novice to accomplished shooters. Being in the military and having been subjected to close quarters combat, being an avid big game hunter, and an avid hand gun shooter, I can attest that these are good drills to practice. Mr. Barry, I pose this question to you, if you have a person breaking into your house, and they surprise you as you come around the corner, are you going to ensure that you see a good sight picture before you start defending yourself. I think a point and shoot would more likely be the scenario. Mr. Schlueter is giving examples of drills that can be used, not to engage in a “pissing contest” over who teaches the best, or what method is the best. In closing, please learn to use the word GRANTED instead of granite, which is a rock.