Best way to zero in a single cock air rifle scope?
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Thread: Best way to zero in a single cock air rifle scope?

  1. Best way to zero in a single cock air rifle scope?

    When zeroing in a scope on center & rim fire rifles I use a locking stand. After locking in the rifle I simply shoot and see where the round hits. Then I while looking through the scope, move the crosshairs to match the hole. WITHOUT MOVING One more test shot & Minor adjustment is usually all that's needed.
    With a air rifle it has to be removed to re-cock which changes everything.
    A new Steoger suppressor model came with factory scope that wasn't even close.
    I had to line up crosshairs with bullseye, then look over top to get an idea which way I needed to go.
    After about 30 min with many small adjustments and re clamping into gun vise it's zero'd in at 50 yards.
    Anyone else use similar method? Or is there an easier way?

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  3. Clamp, Shoot, Zero. Sound like this would save time. You should be able to do this with a laser sight system as well!
    NEVER holster the SAFETY Between your EARS!!!

  4. I use the laser method on my powderburners and some air rifles. I have used the single shot alignment, but my stand is not sturdy enough, and requires multiple shots to zero. It does work, with 4 to 5 shots fired (air rifles).

    I did use a 5.56 laser cartridge in my longarm to zero my nikon scope, and it was almost dead-on. Some of those laser sticks and cartridges are junk, however. You get what you pay for.
    I'm a firm believer in two term limits for all politicians; one in office, the other in prison.

  5. #4
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    there are lots of issues with an air gun ... a springer.. is no different... with pellets as cheap as they are and according to the range you want to shoot, getting the scope to line up east and west is much more critical then North and south at first. First is you have to mount the scope so that it prints on paper.. then you need to check for consistency in flight.. meaning you can't shoot one pellet and expect that to be your average.. Ill take a target with 20 dime sized targets. and take my time and shoot groups of five... if the groups are not tight.. touching each other then there is a problem... of you can get your groups, no matter where they are on paper tight.. in a quarter sized group, then you can then adjust ( move the point of aim ) toward the bull. but not all ammo flies the same way, and a gun that shoots over 1000 fps is not very accurate.. also the type of pellet the weight, skirt size and waist size all play into an accurate air gun.. Iver been shooting air guns for many years, and have invested thousands into the sport..

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