Tell a LEO you have a ccw - Page 6
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Thread: Tell a LEO you have a ccw

  1. #51
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Bellingham, WA, USA
    Posts
    733

    Question what, What, WHAT?!?!?

    Quote Originally Posted by ecocks View Post
    I always inform any LEO I have LE contact with that I am carrying. That would include approaching an officer to make a report, a traffic stop, a knock on the door or being approached by an officer in anything other than an extremely casual, informal capacity (like a Hiya' at the Circle K coffee counter).

    IMO, it is common courtesy granted to a LEO.
    Well, no one can disparage your courtesy (I'm sure that your Mom is proud, and I'm not making a joke), but I really have to question your thought process regarding this issue. If you saw a mugging or a purse snatching, which of the following ways would be more effective in obtaining law enforcement response:

    1. Excuse me, Officer. I just witnessed a purse snatching. The victim doesn't appear injured. The assailant was a (fit favorite description here) and he took off in an easterly direction on Main Street. It happened about thirty seconds ago.

    2. Excuse me, Officer. Before I say anything, please allow me to inform you that I have a concealed carry permit, and I am currently armed. Pardon? Yes, I currently have a pistol on my person. What's that? Oh, yes, it is in an in-waistband holster at four o'clock on my right hand side. Pardon? You want to disarm me before we speak? Sure, but I should tell you..... Oh, okay, against that wall? Okay. (officer pats you down, and disarms you) Just curious, but why do you need to disarm me? For my safety and for yours? Well.... okay. Anyway, I just..... ummm, yes, I do have some identification. Yeah, my license and permit are here in my wallet, but..... Okay, here you go. (officer calls in your information) What was my question? Oh, yeah! I just witnessed a purse snatching. The victim doesn't appear injured. The assailant was a (fit favorite description here) and he took off in an easterly direction on Main Street. It happened about, well, I guess about seven or eight minutes ago.

    Neither one of the above situations involve any wrongdoing by you or the officer involved, but the second option was considerably less efficient.

    As for a knock on your door, that is your private property. I am not sure about your state, but here in Connecticut if the police knock on my door without me calling and requesting their response, they will be met with me and Mr. Steyr on my hip. In fact, without a warrant, they won't even get to come inside. All the while being respectful, of course. Imagine this clip, plus Mr. Steyr on the Hip (only IF it is legal in your location):

    YouTube - How do I keep police from entering my home?
    "The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government." Thomas Jefferson

  2.   
  3. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Boomboy007 View Post
    Well, no one can disparage your courtesy (I'm sure that your Mom is proud, and I'm not making a joke), but I really have to question your thought process regarding this issue. If you saw a mugging or a purse snatching, which of the following ways would be more effective in obtaining law enforcement response:

    1. Excuse me, Officer. I just witnessed a purse snatching. The victim doesn't appear injured. The assailant was a (fit favorite description here) and he took off in an easterly direction on Main Street. It happened about thirty seconds ago.

    2. Excuse me, Officer. Before I say anything, please allow me to inform you that I have a concealed carry permit, and I am currently armed. Pardon? Yes, I currently have a pistol on my person. What's that? Oh, yes, it is in an in-waistband holster at four o'clock on my right hand side. Pardon? You want to disarm me before we speak? Sure, but I should tell you..... Oh, okay, against that wall? Okay. (officer pats you down, and disarms you) Just curious, but why do you need to disarm me? For my safety and for yours? Well.... okay. Anyway, I just..... ummm, yes, I do have some identification. Yeah, my license and permit are here in my wallet, but..... Okay, here you go. (officer calls in your information) What was my question? Oh, yeah! I just witnessed a purse snatching. The victim doesn't appear injured. The assailant was a (fit favorite description here) and he took off in an easterly direction on Main Street. It happened about, well, I guess about seven or eight minutes ago.

    Neither one of the above situations involve any wrongdoing by you or the officer involved, but the second option was considerably less efficient.

    As for a knock on your door, that is your private property. I am not sure about your state, but here in Connecticut if the police knock on my door without me calling and requesting their response, they will be met with me and Mr. Steyr on my hip. In fact, without a warrant, they won't even get to come inside. All the while being respectful, of course. Imagine this clip, plus Mr. Steyr on the Hip (only IF it is legal in your location):

    YouTube - How do I keep police from entering my home?
    My mother doesn't really enter into this situation.

    With regard to your theoretical proposition on witnessing the mugging, if the officer had a chance to catch the guy I would opt for number one, saving the disclosure for his/her eventual return to determine my name and witness report. A simple report as a witness where the crime had occurred oreviously and the crime report was being assembled would be the situation I had in mind when I responded. Oddly, I have never discussed my holster or its location with a police officer nor have I been disarmed either time I have disclosed. A simple I am carrying a concealed weapon and have my permit if you wish to see it sufficed both times. Several people keep making reference to this type of officer response, but it hasn't happened to me that way yet. Guess it has to do with the individual's general demeanor, the officer's mood and the adrenalin pumping in a particular situation.

    I cannot imagine a situation where I would meet an officer at my door and deny them admission if they asked politely. I usually had my holster on when indoors at home but covered when answering the door. I would choose to inform the officer as soon as they finished their introduction as to why they were at my door. Are you worried that the officers smell marijuana from inside your home? Do you need time to dispose of some illegal substances? Not sure why I would ever want to school myself on keeping police from searching my home.

    To each their own though.
    Reality, DEAL with IT!

  4. #53
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Honolulu, HI & Salt Lake City, UT
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    2,797
    Quote Originally Posted by ecocks View Post
    ....I cannot imagine a situation where I would meet an officer at my door and deny them admission if they asked politely. I usually had my holster on when indoors at home but covered when answering the door. I would choose to inform the officer as soon as they finished their introduction as to why they were at my door. Are you worried that the officers smell marijuana from inside your home? Do you need time to dispose of some illegal substances? Not sure why I would ever want to school myself on keeping police from searching my home......
    My attorney has advised me that if any LEO wants to enter my home uninvited, that it would be wise for me to have an attorney present and the officers have either probable cause or a search warrant. Any LEO who knows what they're doing can understand that having the proper paperwork protects them as well as myself. The problem with LEO searching a house with my consent against the advice of my attorney is that they may find something that implicates me in a crime. Regardless of if I have "nothing to hide" or not, all kinds of "bad" can come out of the search. By asking the police to obtain a warrant, they are forced to complete the paperwork and review the evidence that they have. In the process, they may discover that another person is a more viable suspect.

    As you said earlier, "to each his own". IANAL, so I'll take the advice of the attorneys who I have on retainer.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  5. #54
    Exactly. I just cannot come up with a scenario where I would care. If you can, then by all means do what your lawyer told you. I have never even had occasion to think about discussing this with a lawyer.
    Reality, DEAL with IT!

  6. #55
    In Michigan...




    Responsibilities of Individuals With a CCW License:
    • An individual licensed to carry a concealed pistol who is stopped by a police officer (traffic stop or otherwise) while in possession of a pistol shall immediately disclose to the police officer that he or she is carrying a concealed pistol either on their person or in their motor vehicle.


    • Failure to disclose this information to a police officer carries the following penalties:


    • First offense = State Civil Infraction - $500 fine and 6-month CCW license suspension.
    • Second offense = State Civil Infraction - $1000 fine and CCW license revocation.
    Encounters with Police
    "Don't be afraid to see what you see."
    Ronald Reagan

  7. #56
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Upper Connecticut River Valley
    Posts
    29
    My basic point in writing is to emphasize the consistent element in all routine Civ/Cop relations should start with "whatever you do, be clear, be courteous, and be considerate". If you have to go someplace else with it after that kind of start, so be it. How many ways can one say "we all have baggage, and some days it is heavier than others". Don't be a jerk on either side of the window!!

  8. #57
    Agreed. The jerks looking for confrontation or debate on this issue (as you say either side of the window) cause a great deal of the perceived problem. Those officers who feel compelled to give a lecture on the problems you caused exercising your right are in the same bucket with the guy or gal who feels required to make a point of what they do or don't have to do!

    Call it the golden rule or what goes around, comes around mentality, it seems to work more often than not.
    Reality, DEAL with IT!

  9. #58
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Bellingham, WA, USA
    Posts
    733

    Well, gee whiz, guys....

    I am only drawing on three years of metropolitan police force experience here, but I must again state that the preservation of one's rights take precedence over hurt feelings on the part of a police officer. I realize that, in some states, the law requires LEO notification. In those states, inform!

    Please watch this video. It will explain much more concisely than I am able.

    YouTube - Dont Talk to Police
    "The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government." Thomas Jefferson

  10. #59
    Just heard this in my CCW class. You DO NOT HAVE TO identify if you are not carrying, HOWEVER, think about this from the LEO's perspective... He walks up to the car, you hand him the license & registration, then he goes back to the car and finds out that you have a permit to carry... the next approach will be slow, cautious and with his hand on his gun. LEOs just want to get home to their wife & kids. Make it easy on them and volunteer the info and tell them if you are or aren't carrying. No big deal. They aren't working directly for Obama... yet.

    Who knows, they might appreciate the gesture so much that you get by with a warning.

  11. #60
    The instructor of my class a month ago told me the same thing. Can't hurt to do it and it might well get you a bit of a reprieve from the officer giving you a ticket. They'll find out about the license anyhow, as you mentioned. The instructor said he thinks it got him out of two tickets.

    Even tho you're not required to tell them should you not be carrying, it's still not going to hurt a thing if you were to do so.

    .
    Arkansas Concealed Carry Instructor #12-751

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