Walgreen's Pharmacist fired for defending himself and coworkers - Page 4
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Thread: Walgreen's Pharmacist fired for defending himself and coworkers

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmhbob View Post
    To be clear: the pharmacist was fired for violating Walgreens' corporate weapons policy, not for defending himself. There is a difference.

    Would people be as quick to judge Walgreens if he had been fired for carrying a machete in to work?

    Do you have the right to keep me from carrying a gun on your property? Why or why not?
    It's been a week, and no one has thought to answer my questions. They weren't rhetorical.
    Bob Mueller
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  3. #32
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    Would people be as quick to judge Walgreens if he had been fired for carrying a machete in to work?
    If he could conceal it to prevent causing a panic, then maybe it wouldn't bother me, other than the fact that it would be more of a danger to bystanders were he to start swinging it. Not very effective either, but that wasn't your point.

    Do you have the right to keep me from carrying a gun on your property?
    Yes.

    Why or why not?
    My private property. I can keep you off of it completely if I want, for whatever reason I want. But my property isn't open to the public, which actually does make a difference in the eyes of the law. And on my property you aren't required to be there every day and you aren't required to perform a function that could easily put your life at risk. Were that so, I would not restrict your right to defend yourself.

    I see where you're going with this. It's the same property rights argument that always comes out in instances such as this. The "what about your property" analogy often comes up as well, but that isn't a fair analogy. It's true that property rights, in their pure form, do allow the property owner to decide what can or cannot be taken onto the property, but those rights are not unlimited, especially when an employment relationship exists. There are many things that you could legally restrict at your home that an employer could not legally restrict from an employee. There are also things that an employer can require that you normally would not.

    The issue here is whether the employer is unduly restricting the employee by placing him into a situation where his life is threatened, but not allowing him the means to protect himself. If an employer placed you into a high noise environment without ear protection, they'd get sued. A high dust environment without dust masks, high radiation environment, etc., etc. The argument being made is that crime, and in this particular case crime against pharmacies by addicts, is of such a nature that it has reached the level of being an occupational hazard, and that restrictions against drug store employees being able to carry firearms for protection thus represents an undue hazard for said employees. I personally doubt that argument will prevail in this case but it's one that is coming up more and more in recent years, so it may find a sympathetic ear in our courts not too far down the road. I'd sure like to see it.

    But you do bring up a good point. As things stand in our legal system right now, property rights are probably in Walgreens' favor.
    Posterity: you will never know how much it has cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you will make good use of it.--- John Quincy Adams
    Condensed Guide To Ohio Concealed Carry Laws

  4. #33
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    And Walgreens can easily make the point that the employee wasn't required to work at Walgreens, so they weren't "requiring" him to work under those conditions.

    I'd really like to see someone sue an employer under an unsafe work conditions claim. "Unsafe work conditions" have been used to require all sorts of PPE. Why can't it be used to allow firearms?
    Bob Mueller
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  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmhbob View Post
    I'd really like to see someone sue an employer under an unsafe work conditions claim. "Unsafe work conditions" have been used to require all sorts of PPE. Why can't it be used to allow firearms?
    Interesting concept...I do not think we will see this for years to come but a valid point. At this point I think businesses will retain this right.

    Now on the other hand if you were in a very high crime area and the store had been robbed several times the retailer will be at a disadvantage to convince the courts of this right and may face huge losses to a wrongful death suite as a result of violence.

    We all have seen stores add contract security at bad locations in an attempt to prevent violent act's.

  6. You can find another job you can't find another life I'm packin

  7. #36
    I just got off the phone with Walgreens Corporate (800-925-4733). I politely informed them that I would be shopping elsewhere, why, and what it would take to get my business back.

    Do they have a right to do what they did? That is immaterial. I am offended by their action and I certainly have a right to spend my money as I wish.
    NRA,
    Armed Citizens Legal Defense Fund
    http://armedcitizensnetwork.org/

  8. I work for Walgreens as a pharm tech in baton rouge. Our 24 hour location that is 2 miles away was robbed at gunpoint earlier this year. The suspect hopped the counter and held the female pharmacist at gunpoint while she filled his backpack with OxyContin. This happened at 4 am and in a nicer part of town. One of my coworkers and I discuss all the time that the rule makes us a target. We both shoot for fun and are armed at home. If I had extra cash, I would get my ccw license and a new compact 9mm or .40 cal and damn the consequences. I can not count on anyone else to provide for my safety. When seconds count, the police will arrive in minutes. I always joke that the government cat have my guns, but i'd be willing to give back my bullets...at a 1000feet/second.lol

  9. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by chainsaw View Post
    I work for Walgreens as a pharm tech in baton rouge.
    One of the great things about our country.
    You don't like the rules a company set's you can always find a job that meets your requirements.

  10. Maybe so. I don't break their rules. Please direct towards a pharmacy that does not have such rules. I love my job as it gives me a chance to serve the general public and allows flexible hours so I may work while pursuing my BSW. The thing that gets a lot of us is that Walgreens and other companies will not let us protect ourselves and/ or provide protection( ie guards) to us. I don't if any of you are familiar with Walgreens dispute with express scripts , but because of it we are losing hours and business. This makes us more of a target for robbery as the store is next to empty and sparsely staffed. What do we do?

  11. #40
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    Family owned Pharm. in my area sealed the pharmacist in. Windows where he greets customers are bullet-proof glass...Steel door and frame. Slide out drawer. He said he was tired of the oxy heads jumping the counter. Has not had any issues since he installed this equipment. Sad but I think we will see more going this direction.

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