WTB Looking to buy first gun! - Page 3
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Thread: Looking to buy first gun!

  1. I've been carrying a concealed firearm since 1969. First gun questions are a bear to answer. What's it for? I might tell you to get a shotgun if you tell me its for home defense. Are you an experienced shooter? Revolvers get a bum rap because they only hold 5 or 6 rounds. They are also pretty much goof proof. I'm a professional and certified instructor. If you live in South suburban Pittsburgh, I can get you in touch with any number of folks who will let you shoot what they own--myself included. I carry 2 handguns most times in weather that demands a jacket, but that's me. I have a great revolver for a BUG (back up gun), and some bigger ones for trail carry. Pennsylvania game wardens still don't all understand that the License to Carry Firearms trumps a hunting license. My regular carry guns are both semi-autos. A 1911 and a little LCP. Go to the range, shoot many guns, make an informed decision. Just because I happen to love the 1911 platform doesn't make it right for you. DO NOT BE AFRAID TO CONSIDER A USED FIREARM. I bought a Kimber Custom Shop that retails around 1600 bucks for way less than that, and it shoots great. Any decent gun shop will warrant their sales, even on used guns, for six months to a year.

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  3. An important thing I did when trying to choose my first one was WHY, for what purpose am I getting it and stick to that and not swayed by all the pretty/cool ones. I got mine specifically to carry while on trail runs. therefore I needed a smaller, lightweight gun. And as the saleslady told me was for the purpose I was getting it for a revolver was best choice. I choose the Ruger .357 LCR ruger .357 LCR - Hawaiian Search - Powered by Yahoo Image Search Results SO, figure out what you want it for then go to a reputable shop and a good dealer can help you choose. Also research the specific gun you want so you know a but about it. Just my 2 cents

  4. I was told by the gal at the gun shop I went to a revolver is great, for what I wanted it for, because out running on trails if a creepo grabbed and I fell etc they don't get jammed. No slide action that needs two hands to unjam. Glad I read your post it makes that choice feel better. The gun in my avatar is one I won last month!! I love it too

  5. #24
    We have the choice of so many good handguns in the U.S. Many countries wish they has access to as many as we have.
    So just look online at guns, go to gun shops and handle some, and go to a range and rent some to shoot. Revolvers are
    probably easiest for beginners because you have no mag or taking apart to clean. But there are some excellent semi-autos
    and it's no big thing learning how to load a mag and clean them. For home defense simply get whatever you like, revolver,
    semi-auto, or shotgun because that gun will stay inside until you need to use it. Also I still say for a first gun that .32 acp,
    .380, or .22lr are best to start out with.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    N. Central Indiana
    Posts
    512
    This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike.

    Get some basic training FIRST. At this point you need fundamentals, not run and gun, or force on force. Reputable instructors will provide a host of handguns and holsters for you to experience in class. That will give you some idea of where your preferences might lead you in handgun selection. Then.....

    Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion... again....get some training......proper shooting techniques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right. Most gun shops have a box of used holsters that you can experiment with after you've chosen what gun works best for you. There are many options for concealed/open carry.

    By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there. Caliber doesn't count until after you can consistently hit your target.

    If you're buying a handgun for home protection, and you choose to NOT have it on your person, you should consider where in your home you might be if someone kicks the door in. I don't see a person in a position to be able to ask an intruder to "hang on a sec, while I get my gun"

    There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil...I've known more than a few gents who didn't care for the recoil of what's often called a "ladies gun"... just sayin....

    Again, just my ramblings.... but they work for me...

    Shoot Safely....
    Only when our arms are sufficient, without doubt, can we be certain, without doubt, that they will never be employed....... John F. Kennedy
    Life Member NRA Life Member Marine Corps League

  7. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Gunpacking_Running_Jewel View Post
    I was told by the gal at the gun shop I went to a revolver is great, for what I wanted it for, because out running on trails if a creepo grabbed and I fell etc they don't get jammed. No slide action that needs two hands to unjam. Glad I read your post it makes that choice feel better. The gun in my avatar is one I won last month!! I love it too
    I would tend to agree except if you were carrying a Glock, I have not done it to mine but I think they could almost be used as a hammer or a pry bar or maybe a shovel and still shoot, and then there are some semi autos that jam if you look at them crooked
    Bad Guys of the world beware the next time you think about jumping on a old guy, because its a fair bet he's to old to fight and probably to fat to run, but can put one in your eye at 50ft with his weak hand

  8. #27
    On the subject of home protection, I got a chance to do some shooting with a S&W governor, shooting 45s seems like a waste as the gun has such a short barrel, accuracy while not terrible is not the best, but the patterns I got with #3 or 4 buck at INSIDE THE HOUSE ranges would seemingly make it a great in home defence weapon, and since I'm not sponsored buy any ammo company, that stuff with the discs and pellets is a waste of money it does what they say but for inside the home some #4 buck will work better
    Bad Guys of the world beware the next time you think about jumping on a old guy, because its a fair bet he's to old to fight and probably to fat to run, but can put one in your eye at 50ft with his weak hand

  9. let me first say,so glad to be here. First thing I would say is read, read and read some more. Then find a few that seem to be on the line of what you are looking for and will fit the purpose the best. Then hop on you tube and watch some videos on the ones you have selected. I also agree with going and renting some at a local shooting range. Nothing like feeling it to make sure it's comfortable

  10. #29
    Unless you have a specific gun your looking at, why not consider a 10mm. Its the same size bullet, bigger casing, and lots of the rounds being produced have similar ballistics as the .40
    .
    Then you also have the full power 10mm loads that have much more power.

  11. #30
    My suggetion is similar to one of the above, get a used quality .38 or .357 revolver and learn how to shoot first by taking a firearms training class and ask ALOT of questions. Going to a gun shop and saying sell me a gun is a dumb idea. Stay away from DAO guns for now (Glocks, XD's) until you learn basic firearm safety.

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