Crimson Trace Laser Grips - LG-619 G-Series
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Thread: Crimson Trace Laser Grips - LG-619 G-Series

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    New Orleans, LA
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    Crimson Trace Laser Grips - LG-619 G-Series

    The first time I saw a handgun with a laser on it was when my dad was showing me his new Beretta 96. After making sure it wasn't loaded, I picked it up and as I gripped it I saw the red dot on the wall I was aiming at. It took me a second to realize I was pressing the activation button that was built into the grips. That was a few years ago before I owned any guns myself and said I'd like to get those when I bought a gun. Fast forward a few years and I now own a few firearms. The training I've had has taught me not to be reliant on lasers or add-on's like that but I recently had the chance to try out their laser grip product LG-619 G-Series which fits model Glock 19, 23, 25, 32, and 38.

    As you can see by the pictures below, installation is very easy. It took just a minute to installed it on my Glock G23. It comes with a tool to punch out the pin in the Glock grip. Install the batteries and then slid the laser grip into place. Then insert the grip pin they provide and you are done.





    It doesn't change the feel of the grips much at all. The one thing I noticed is that there is only one button with is in the middle of the backstrap. Their other grips such as the ones my father had on his Beretta 96 had buttons on each side of the grip where your middle finger rests which makes it very easy to turn on and off. With this model you turn on the laser by simply gripping the pistol. It is very comfortable and natural. I did have second thoughts about it being on all of the time with my normal grip but I'll get to that. The next thing I noticed is that when I indexed my finger on the slide while not on the trigger, it got in the way of the laser. I didn't like this at first until I used it more and used it while practicing a few times. Even though it would normally be on when I was holding the pistol, having my finger indexed allowed me to control whether the laser shot out or not. And after a while I got used to it. If I want the laser to shoot out, I drop my finger down just slightly.

    As far as the accuracy, it says it come sighted in at 50 yards. I sighted mine in at 10 yards which was easy with the tool that they provide. It is just a tiny allen wrench that you stick in the appropriate hole to make adjustments. Since then I haven't messed with it and it seems pretty accurate. The round goes where I want it without looking through the sights AND with good trigger control. If you have bad trigger control then a laser won't help unless you use it for practice as well.



    Crimson Trace also provided a an hour long DVD called "Shots In The Dark". It was a decent video to watch as they go over tips on how to use the laser, how to integrate it with your dry practice routine, and some myths about using lasers. I agree that using it with dry practice helps because you can see where your shots would go when you squeeze the trigger. If you are pulling you will definitely be able to tell with the laser on.

    One thing I like about this laser over some other models is that if it breaks, it has no effect on the gun itself. It is just an additional tool that is a great addition at a great price. I just purchased a Glock G26 as my daily carry gun and plan on getting their Glock Sub-Compact model for it as well.

    For more information, visit http://www.crimsontrace.com.


    Memberships: NRA, GOA, USCCA
    Guns: Glock 26, Ruger LCP, Beretta 90-Two .40, Beretta PX4 Storm Subcompact 9MM, Beretta Tomcat, Bushmaster Patrolman M4

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Inland Empire
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    394

    Oh look, a Fire-Fly landed on my heart :-)

    Howdy Lukem!
    Good for you that you invested in a Crimson Trace 'red-dot-of-death' add-on. Ironic that if you stuck it on a $300 S&W .38 revolver, it would be worth more than the weapon! On a Glock you sure got yourself a 1-grand $hooter! Like your Dad, I bought into the 1st model of the (new to the scene) right-sided grip 'wonder' (do they make 'em for left handed firers?) that with a bit of tweaking puts that tiny red dot just where you want it. Got mine about 6 months after I bought my Beretta 96 Centurion new. I love the idea that you have to take both your old grips off and switch them out for CT grips, as it makes for a well balanced weapon, my Beretta grips on the left side were a few grams heavier & had a very different feel to them than the rippled finish of the CT grip, which would have made the feel all wrong and look like a bad re-build. My CT is the Model LG-202. Battery CR2032 or (better) the DL2032, a lithium that will last around 6 hours active, 4 for the basic CR battery, or 5 years on the shelf unused. At first I got so anal with trying to make the laser do exactly what my own two eyes were so used to doing, then it just became 2nd nature. I seldom slide the rear switch to 'on' anymore unless I just want to test that the laser placement hasn't shifted from what/where my front & rear sights & common shooting sense tell me the round will go. It IS easy to get lazy with one, and IMHO if you let a laser do all your aiming for you then you slowly lose out on the basic sighting skills that should always take 1st place in clear daylight when a good marksman doesn't need a dot to tell them where that round will hit, or even see it in a bright surrounding lit-up target/perp. It also is a static beam of lased light not allowing you to make minor adjustments (without that tiny hex Alan-wrench) for a targets @ 10 meters and still be dead on at one out at 50 meters, or compensate for the wind, or even the ammo you are using. Great surprise for that perp in your dark home at night, or blocking that alley you plan on walking down, one round does the trick, a 'pet' theory not yet a war-story! I do agree that your index finger needs to be trained not to block the beam emitter, but with practice that changes how you grip the weapon slightly, has to. Like all add-ons to your basic shooter it has it's place, but if you rely on it too much your BRM skills will soon be something you need to refresh. Rule of thumb, you prolly won't use it to fire at 50 meters much, nor 5, so think a 20-25 meter pre-set and that is IMHO about as close as U want any perp to get to you, also my ideal firing distance and 1/2 way from it's max to minimal range a basic for most non-scoped pistols. Warranty was 3 years normal use on mine, and I've never had to switch out the original diode, even though mine came with 2 back-ups and ran me just over $350 new in 1998. Folks at the ranges love to see it and most want to try it out, but the (not cheap) batteries used up and the rubber pressure plate all squished flat do put a dent in what starts as a $325 add-on and goes up from there. I like the edge it gives me, and if I were a perp looking at a red dot on my chest that I couldn't trace the source to, I may start seeing my life flash through my mind, or so many folks have told me who met death but beat it. Glad that CT is now making them available for other (smaller) weapons, not just the hi-Cal ones it only fit when I bought into it. I think it beats an under-barrel-mounted laser (normally bulkier) any day or those ones you swap the front break-down assembly for, at only a few grams it doesn't throw off the basic feel of the weapon and at 1st sight unless U really examine the grips no one even knows U turned a basic model pistol into something that may give you that extra edge you need when the SHTF. Just don't forget to disengage it when you holster your weapon or the pressure of a simple holster pressing against the pressure-pad on your 2 hour drive home will leave you with a dead battery next time you go to use it. For folks whose main problem is sighting, or aiming well on targets it's the solution to a lot more bulls 'n brags. Final word, I prolly shot over 3K rounds through my Centurion over the 10 years I have owned it, and all that kinetic stress moving into/thru the laser housing will move it slightly off a pre-set you put it on brand new, so make that L-shaped wrench a basic part of your carry-on kit so about every 500 or so rounds you can get it back on dead center. I hope down the road that CT makes laser grips for every modern pistol around, lasers and weapons have been around a long while, but few systems do the magic that Crimson Trace adds so gracefully and so inconspicuously to any pistol with it's low profile to even a magnificent weapon in the hands of a piss-poor target shooter or an armed citizen walking back to their car at night knowing he/she has that extra edge of laser assisted aiming. (****! I got all long winded again!)
    Regards,

    Canis-Lupus :icon_wink:

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    New Orleans, LA
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    Thanks. It is good to add someone's view of their regular laser grips as well. I just asked my contact at CT about making grips with the button on both sides.


    Memberships: NRA, GOA, USCCA
    Guns: Glock 26, Ruger LCP, Beretta 90-Two .40, Beretta PX4 Storm Subcompact 9MM, Beretta Tomcat, Bushmaster Patrolman M4

  5. #4
    Join Date
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    From Crimson Trace Rep:

    As mentioned, he seems to have the original LG-202’s that have a single side activation. Those were replaced about 6-7 years ago with the LG-302, a dual-side activation unit. Late last year, we added the LG-402 that incorporates a front-activation control.

    The 302 and 402 are still in production and on our website.
    I didn't even realize they made a version with a front activation.
    http://crimsontrace.com/Home/Product...8/Default.aspx


    Memberships: NRA, GOA, USCCA
    Guns: Glock 26, Ruger LCP, Beretta 90-Two .40, Beretta PX4 Storm Subcompact 9MM, Beretta Tomcat, Bushmaster Patrolman M4

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    NE Portland, Oregon - PacNW
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    I really like the Crimson Trace Product but wish there was a product that could be used on a broader spectrum of handguns.

    hmmm... Necessity is the mother of invention. I've got to figure this one out.:mp070803115237MiKe-
    MΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

  7. #6
    So, can anyone tell me how they work for left handers? The photo above shows someone holding the gun left handed, but that doesn't match the text, which describes interrupting the laser beam with the index finger. You would think that Crimson Trace sells enough laser grips to justify at least a few left handed models for the most popular guns.

  8. i can't speak for the others, but the glock models work fine for left-handed shooting. the laser projects out of the right side of the frame, high enough that your thumb/support hand won't interfere with the beam. you can see how much width it adds though, i think it would be uncomfortable to carry next to your body in a close fitting holster....

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by DarrellM5 View Post
    So, can anyone tell me how they work for left handers? The photo above shows someone holding the gun left handed, but that doesn't match the text, which describes interrupting the laser beam with the index finger. You would think that Crimson Trace sells enough laser grips to justify at least a few left handed models for the most popular guns.
    Most reports I have seen say left-handed use is not a problem. I am nearly ambidextrous (except writing) and frequently practice left-handed grip (two handed and one handed) without difficulty. In two-handed my thumbs naturally point slightly down. If your experience differs, you may have to adjust slightly. Many retailers have them in stock. I suggest that you give them a try.
    Howard
    I carry a gun because I can't carry a cop!
    EDC Primary: M&P45fs, Crimson Trace LaserGrips, Insight XTI Procyon light in SmartCarry holster
    >>> http://MP-Pistol.com/
    EDC BUF: LCP, Crimson Trace LaserGuard in DeSantis Super Fly holster
    >>> http://LCPforum.com/

  10. I just got a set for my S&W 642 (I shoot lefty) and haven't had any problem so far. My left thumb rests naturally on top of the laser housing and my support thumb is able to rest just underneath it. I guess if I really let my support thumb raise up it might block the laser, but it doesn't seem to be a problem so far. I'd like to get a set for my CZ RAMI or my Kahr CW9, but CT doesn't make 'em yet. :icon_sad:
    "Though defensive violence will always be 'a sad necessity' in the eyes of men of principle, it would be still more unfortunate if wrongdoers should dominate just men." St. Augustine A.D. 354-430

    -LP

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Indiana
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    I had Crimson Trace grips on a Ruger P94 I used to own. I absolutely loved them and plan to get them for the Glock 22 that is now my primary carry weapon. What I like about this laser is that the laser lines up perfectly with the sights and does not affect how the gun fits in any holster, like a barrel mounted laser device would.

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