Anyone Ever Wear Body Armor?
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Thread: Anyone Ever Wear Body Armor?

  1. #1
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    Mar 2008
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    Anyone Ever Wear Body Armor?

    I stumbled on a website that sold various types of body armor the other day. And I got to thinking, I've never heard of any civilian wearing body armor besides that 50 Cent guy. I was wondering if any of you wear it, or have worn it. Is it comfortable? Does it restrict movement at all?
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]In order to rally people, governments need enemies. They want us to be afraid, to hate, so we will rally behind them. And if they don't have a real enemy, they'll invent one in order to mobilize us.

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  3. The lastest generations of vest are much better than the turtle shell vest of 10-15 years ago, but they are still not that comfortable and the biggest problem is they are hot. If you live in a cold climate that is not a problem, but if you live in a hot, or humid climate that can be very uncomfortable. Imagine putting on 10-15 T shirts and wearing them all day long, (go ahead and try it tomorrow) that is much like what the armor feels like. Most civilians just are not going to wear the vest as it is not confortable. Most cops wear them because they expect to be in hostile situations where getting shot is a real possability. If you are seriously thinking of getting a vest, you will have to decide if you want full protection (more protection on the sides, but hotter), or the contour (it covers the front and back but no side protection, not as hot). I would suggest talking to someone who wears body armor regularly, before spending the money to buy a vest. If you decide to get one do not get a used one as the fabric breaks down some after 5 years, or at least they suggest replacing them every five years.:huh:

  4. As an LEO i would say that its just not worth it for most civilians to consider this. I would never wear mine off duty because im not going to be dealing with the same threat level as when im at work and its just uncomfortable. There are far more comfortable models out there than what i wear but they are very pricey ($600 to $1000 depending on what level of protection your wanting). Not to mention that it will be noticable to people that your wearing something under you clothing. But i do not want to discourage you from looking into it. If you are planning to be in situations where such protection is warented then i would encourage you to continue your research. Hollar if you have any questions, always happy to help.

  5. #4
    I'm not LEO, but I have had the privalege to try out a concealable small caliber vest one time. Honestly, I don't know how police go day to day with these things on. I could see having one if I lived in a bad crime area and wanted to be fully prepped for a SHTF moment. Otherwise, statistically armed citizens are less likely to get shot. However, if you are in an area or in a profession that needs some bullet proofing, they make jackets, coats, and clothing that also are disguised vests. Honestly the concealed contoured vest is the one i'd go for. Although it does not afford side protection. There are a bunch of very informed LEO on this site that I'm sure know everything there is to know and all have their own preferences when it comes to vests. Might they want to ring in with their favorites?? I personally can never see owning one, but I guess never say never. ;)
    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    ---Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759.

  6. #5
    Join Date
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    I do not think it would be worth it unless your job puts you at risk, if you live in a high crime area or not a vest in the home to slip on if you hear a intruder might be something to think about.
    "Firearms stand next in importance to the Constitution itself. They are the American people's liberty teeth and keystone under independence ... From the hour the Pilgrims landed, to the present day, events, occurrences, and tendencies prove that to insure peace, security and happiness, the rifle and pistol are equally indispensable . . . the very atmosphere of firearms everywhere restrains evil interference - they deserve a place of honor with all that is good" (George Washington)

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    I tried it once with a "concealable" model. It was a relatively thin model that had a white liner and velcro on the straps. There was also a pocket in the front for ceramic inserts. It was still pretty bulky, and tends to push up against an IWB, providing an additional obstruction to get through to access the firearm. You also have to wear a shirt under it, which adds additional complexity. It's sort of like wearing a fat suit, in that your clothes suddenly become smaller, and you have to adjust your car seat because you're suddenly closer to the steering wheel. It's also hot, because essentially you're wearing an insulated vest.

    There are regular-looking jackets available that have had kevlar sewn into the lining. I'm not sure how they fit, but you might want to try one of those. It would be far more practical than trying to conceal it under your existing clothing, and shouldn't interfere too much with a concealed firearm. Obviously this is useful only at a time of year when you can have a reason to wear a jacket - but you wouldn't be able to conceal a vest under a t-shirt, anyway.

    From a legal perspective, a ballistic vest may be asking for trouble. Say you shoot a perp in a borderline situation, and later have to explain to the judge why you were wearing body armor. It'll sound fishy in court any way you tell it. You've already got a strike against you because most members of the public aren't familiar with the idea of CWP, or open carry for that matter. Then they find out you were wearing body armor...well, that sounds like you were actively looking for trouble.

    It's probably not a bad thing to have around, just in case - and you could wear it for a short period of time, or in a TEOTWAWKI situation. A more practical and all-around comfortable option might be to take some steel and armor your car in several strategic places - doors, backs of seats, trunk, etc - and just keep it light enough so it's not a burden on gas. You don't have to remember to put it on or physically carry it around, and it will protect others as well. If you're feeling ambitious, there is some relatively thin ballistic glass for cars available now.
    Silent Running, by Mike and the Mechanics

  8. #7
    I have thought about it before but the price of a really good one is such that I have just never done it yet. I may somday, who knows. As far as comfort I do believe the new ones that we have out there today are more comfortable than they used to be but still not sure you could really call them comfortable. Comforting perhaps.
    By faith Noah,being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear,prepared an ark to the saving of his house;by the which he condemned the world,and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith Heb.11:7

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooter View Post
    I stumbled on a website that sold various types of body armor the other day. And I got to thinking, I've never heard of any civilian wearing body armor besides that 50 Cent guy. I was wondering if any of you wear it, or have worn it. Is it comfortable? Does it restrict movement at all?
    I thought it was illegal.....
    Victory rewards not the army that fires the most rounds, but who is the more accurate shot. ---Unknown

  10. #9
    We had over vest that could be put on quickly and used when nessary.

  11. #10
    Not an LEO im a Aux. Police officer, so I only wear it on duty about 20 hours monthly. For those of us with a weight issue I can attest : It's not comfortable. It's hot in the summer, insulates pretty well in the winter, but adds almost a size to your outerwear. It will ride up a bit under the pits. Your pretty mobile in it, though. If you might be a target, it's worth it. But just remember the two officers killed in Cleveland the last year. One was hit right below the armor in the belly and the other through the huge arm pit opening, needed to keep you mobile.
    Last edited by rmarcustrucker; 03-11-2008 at 02:27 PM. Reason: spelling.
    Rule #1 of CCW: Don't get made.

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