question about vehicle mounted holsters
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Titletown, USA Wisconsin
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    7

    question about vehicle mounted holsters

    I just read an article called: How to Avoid Getting Attacked in Your Car (October 28, 2013) | by Jason Hanson

    here's a link, if you missed it: How to Avoid Getting Attacked in Your Car - USA Carry

    So... the suggestion is it should take the same amount of time to draw from the 'seated in your vehicle' position as it does to draw when you're standing. Would a rig like this be legal, as long as you have a CCP? I realize it varies by state, (I'm in Wisconsin). If legal, this may be a better option for some, on a long trip.

    question about vehicle mounted holsters-universal-vehicle-handgun-holster-mount.jpg

    Thanks for your input.
    Mike De

  2.   
  3. #2
    I have a Serpa screwed into the same spot on my X3. I used a Serpa because I could screw it down and for the retention on it. If you get hit from behind or anywhere else hard enough stuff goes everywhere. I still keep the gun I carry on my hip.
    Certified NRA Firearms Instructor
    Oklahoma SDA Instructor
    Utah CCW Instructor

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Merc4stroke View Post
    I just read an article called: How to Avoid Getting Attacked in Your Car (October 28, 2013) | by Jason Hanson

    here's a link, if you missed it: How to Avoid Getting Attacked in Your Car - USA Carry

    So... the suggestion is it should take the same amount of time to draw from the 'seated in your vehicle' position as it does to draw when you're standing. Would a rig like this be legal, as long as you have a CCP? I realize it varies by state, (I'm in Wisconsin). If legal, this may be a better option for some, on a long trip.

    question about vehicle mounted holsters-universal-vehicle-handgun-holster-mount.jpg

    Thanks for your input.
    Mike De
    Vehicle carry laws vary widely from state to state, so you'll have to check your local laws to know for sure. For example, in SC, you can carry in a car with a CCW, but the weapon has to ve concealed, whereas in NC, it has to be in plain sight. Opposite laws in adjascent states.
    That said, I'm in SC, and I use a DeSantis Kingston vehicle holster for my carry gun. The one you pictures is probably my second favorite next to the Kingston.
    No statement should be believed because it is made by an authority.
    Robert A. Heinlein

  5. #4
    I like the idea, but I don't know if it would work well for me.

    I'm in and out of my car mostly on short trips. Do you spend a significant about of time on the road?

    I ask because I'm curious what you do with the car mounted weapon when you get out at your destination. Do you secure it in the car, leave it in the steering column holster, or take it with you?

    -SF

    Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk

  6. #5
    Shoulder rig works for me. That or the hidden compartment in my ridgeline.
    Typos are for the entertainment of the reader. Don't let it go to your head!

  7. #6
    Best advice is to check state laws to be sure.

    Sent from my Nexus 10 using USA Carry mobile app
    Former USMC Sgt.
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  8. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    TN
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    4,255
    As someone who experienced two car accidents, I can say that everything that is not properly secured will become airborne and has the potential to injure or kill you or someone else. A screwed down SERPA holster with its active retention is probably fine. It should be out of sight from someone standing next to the driver door, like someone walking by in the parking lot or a police officer during a traffic stop.

    The pictured holster in the original post is probably the worst choice. No active retention and quite visible. Tacticool and impractical.

    State laws should be obviously followed as well.

    Never leave a firearm (loaded or not) unlocked in your locked vehicle. It is bad enough that I need to even have a GunVault Nanovault in my car, if for some reason I need to enter a gun-free zone and leave my firearm in the vehicle. Leaving it visibly behind is just asking for it to get stolen. Even leaving it behind unlocked inside the locked vehicle (e.g. in the center console or glove box), makes it still vulnerable to a smash and grab job.

    I personally carry on the body (4 o'clock) in the car and practice the draw. The most important lesson here is not to sit on the shirt that covers your concealed firearm. Instead, sit down in the car, close and lock the door, and lift the shirt you are sitting on above the firearm, while keeping it concealed from the outside view. The draw requires me to only slightly lean forward to the left to access the firearm and remove it from the holster. It is slightly slower that drawing while standing, but keep in mind that you do have another option: Drive over the threat if a legal self defense situation with a deadly weapon exists.

    PS: I had one "positive" experience during the last car accident. A women ignored a stop sign and just drove across the intersection, putting her car right in front of mine. With a total of 4 people in the car, there was not enough room for me to come to a stop. I hit the other car in the back of the left side, turning it 180 degrees. No-one was injured. Both cars were totaled. Now, here is the "positive" experience. I had an adrenaline dump, experienced tunnel vision targeting the threat, and perceived time as being slowed down. All effects someone would experience in a serious self defense situation. Probably the best "training" of my life, costing a total of $25,000 in property damage inflicted by the other driver.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by bofh View Post
    As someone who experienced two car accidents, I can say that everything that is not properly secured will become airborne and has the potential to injure or kill you or someone else. A screwed down SERPA holster with its active retention is probably fine. It should be out of sight from someone standing next to the driver door, like someone walking by in the parking lot or a police officer during a traffic stop.

    The pictured holster in the original post is probably the worst choice. No active retention and quite visible. Tacticool and impractical.

    State laws should be obviously followed as well.

    Never leave a firearm (loaded or not) unlocked in your locked vehicle. It is bad enough that I need to even have a GunVault Nanovault in my car, if for some reason I need to enter a gun-free zone and leave my firearm in the vehicle. Leaving it visibly behind is just asking for it to get stolen. Even leaving it behind unlocked inside the locked vehicle (e.g. in the center console or glove box), makes it still vulnerable to a smash and grab job.

    I personally carry on the body (4 o'clock) in the car and practice the draw. The most important lesson here is not to sit on the shirt that covers your concealed firearm. Instead, sit down in the car, close and lock the door, and lift the shirt you are sitting on above the firearm, while keeping it concealed from the outside view. The draw requires me to only slightly lean forward to the left to access the firearm and remove it from the holster. It is slightly slower that drawing while standing, but keep in mind that you do have another option: Drive over the threat if a legal self defense situation with a deadly weapon exists.
    I do the same as you in the car: gun stays at 4 o'clock IWB. Otherwise, you have to transfer the gun to your holster when you get out, and that might be awkward in a public parking lot. I still have to remember to put my shirt back over the gun when I get out, and I've had a few times I almost forgot. State laws indeed. You have to know them. In Texas a CHL holder can carry in the car concealed. A non-CHL holder can also have a gun in a car, but the gun must be visible. I'm not sure how you could do that and have the gun secured from falling or flying in an accident.
    -
    Leaving a gun in a car. I go to extraordinary lengths to not do this. Way too many guns are stolen from cars. I only know a few people who carry guns, yet I know three who have had guns stolen from their locked cars. It's like thieves can just tell there's a gun inside. Better to plan ahead, and if you can't take your gun inside, leave it at home in the safe. I try to avoid going to such places, but it's not always possible: voting, jury duty, schools. In those cases my guns are in the gun safe, and I carry pepper spray. As soon as the event is over, I go straight home.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
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    3,832
    Personally, I have never liked the idea of a mounted weapon in the vehicle. If it is not comfortable on you with your holster that you have while driving, then I would try these two things. One) try a different position with your holster while you drive and see if it feels better; and/or two) try a different holster that would be more comfortable.

    The reason I do not like the idea of a mounted weapon is varied. For one, there is excess and unnecessary handling of your firearm. Keep it in your holster. It is safest there. Another reason, is that you have practiced long and hard (hopefully) with the holster that you carry with. If you have a situation where you need your firearm and it is in a different position, is your instinct and muscle memory going to go for your holster or for your vehicle mounted rig? Still another reason, I prefer my firearm on me is because if I am on a long trip, chances are I'll be in more than one state. Certain state laws do not allow you to have a loaded gun in your vehicle that is not on your person. If you have a permit/license that is honored in another state, it is allowed to be on your person.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Titletown, USA Wisconsin
    Posts
    7
    Some very good points everyone. Thank you for your time and input.

    I agree with the importance of comfort with your EDC holster, and the muscle memory of it being in the same place every time. IWB at about 4 o'clock works for me as well.

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