Which one?
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Thread: Which one?

  1. #1

    Which one?

    I'm looking for a CCW Glock. I like the characteristics of the 10mm, so do I go with a G20 or G29? I was previously considering a G23, but decided I wanted the ballistics that the 10mm offers.

    It seems that many are a proponent of the G23 for CCW. The dimensional differences between the two are such that the G20 is 3/4" long and a 1/2" taller.

    Anyone here have any experience with the G20 for CCW?

    As an aside, this Glock will also serve as backup hunting weapon, as well as an accompaniment on hiking trips.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
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    First of all, welcome to USA Carry!

    Anyway, my suggestion is that you try both guns, for their feel, your ability to effectively conceal them, and their shootability, among other things, and then make your choice based on that. Just because one or two may recommend the G20, that doesn't meant that it's the best choice for you. Only you can decide that.
    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.

    Benjamin Franklin

  4. #3
    I second tattedupboy on trying them both. One reason the 10mm never really went mainstream is the amount of recoil. Another thing to consider is ammo availability and price.

    I've never shot a 10mm, but it's on my to-do list.

    Welcome to the forum and let us know which one you choose.
    "When the outflow exceeds the inflow, the upkeep becomes the downfall"

  5. #4
    I was talking with Glock Fan offline, and he mentioned the same thing - availability and price of ammo. With that in mind...maybe the G23 might be the better choice. I can deal with recoil, so that's not an issue for me, personally. I'll probably go back and forth on this, though, until I actually put the cash on the counter and go home with a new Glock...and knowing me, I'll probably second guess myself no matter which Glock I choose. On the upside...at least I'll have a new Glock

    edit: On the other hand, I already know how I perform with a 9mm, so maybe I should just go with a G19 - Cheaper to shoot and as the mantra goes: a well aimed small caliber is more lethal than an ill-placed large caliber. Ammunitionstore.com has 9mm rounds listed at $8.95/50, whereas 40S&W runs $12.95/50 (Winchester brand ammunition). The cost is negligible, really, but when I take the kids to the range, the 9mm would be easier for them to manage than a .40 or 10mm. And I honestly wouldn't expect to engage a target with a handgun beyond 25 meters.

    Decisions, decisions....I wonder how upset my wife would be if I bought two Glocks
    Last edited by Shooter Mike; 01-04-2009 at 07:02 PM.

  6. #5
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    Don't let anyone here dissuade you from buying the 10mm if that's what you really want. All I'm saying is that if you do, try out each model before you buy to determine which you like better.
    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.

    Benjamin Franklin

  7. #6
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    You can get 10mm rounds that are of the same power level as mainstream .40 S&W rounds. Keep in mind that you will probably have to order your ammo if you get 10mm. You can't get 10mm at your corner superwallyverse, but you can get .40 S&W. I believe you also can get conversion barrels for the Glock and shoot .40 S&W through a 10mm Glock. Keep in mind that if you do this, be sure to get a 10mm Glock and not a .40 S&W. Your 10mm pistols have a longer magazine well to accomodate the length of the 10mm round. Your .40 S&W pistols are typically built around a 9mm frame and thus a shorter magazine well.

    If you reload 10mm isn't that bad with the cost of reloading 10mm being comparable to .40 S&W since all of the components are the same except for the brass and differing powder charge. I will also attest that if anything will get you into reloading, 10mm probably will because of factory 10mm ammo availability and cost.
    Know the law; don't ask, don't tell.
    NRA & UT Certified Instructor; CT, FL, NH, NV, OR, PA & UT CCW Holder
    Happy new 1984; 25 years behind schedule. Send lawyers, guns and money...the SHTF...

  8. #7
    So after much debate, I decided on a different gun than I originally considered -- I bought a Glock 30SF. The shorter trigger reach and the slim frame was a natural fit for my hand. I think this will be the ideal CCW for me. I added the Pearce grip extensions to the magazines and the gun feels like it was custom made for my grip.

    I am considering adding the tactical laser light to this, but am having a heck of a time finding a holster to accommodate the 30SF with tactical light -- any advice?

  9. #8
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    congrats on the 30SF... i recently picked one up too... i'm having the same troubles finding a holster to allow my TLR2 to be fitted to it... i spose i'll just stick with my surefire E1L on my support side...
    Glock 19 | S&W 1911PD
    Rock River Arms Elite LAR-15

  10. Quote Originally Posted by Shooter Mike View Post
    So after much debate, I decided on a different gun than I originally considered -- I bought a Glock 30SF. The shorter trigger reach and the slim frame was a natural fit for my hand. I think this will be the ideal CCW for me. I added the Pearce grip extensions to the magazines and the gun feels like it was custom made for my grip.

    I am considering adding the tactical laser light to this, but am having a heck of a time finding a holster to accommodate the 30SF with tactical light -- any advice?
    I was reading through this thread and was going to suggest the G30. I also went with a G30SF with night sights. It's a great gun. I already have a 9mm, so 40S&W was just too close. There is another issue to consider with 40S&W if you reload. Glock pistols have an unsupported chambers. That means that a very small portion of the casing near the base is unsupported. After a round is fired, that unsupported area can bulge out and weaken. If you reload the same round and the same weakened area chambers in the same location, it can blow out.

    The problem is most prevalent in 40S&W and there have been instances of +P and +P+ factory rounds failing. I recently bought a S&W Sigma not knowing that it has the same chamber design. I sold the gun the next day mostly because I don't want a gun that I can't reload ammo for. More than a few people have told me that the problem exists more in 40S&W because it is higher pressure round than 45ACP and more susceptible to over-seating or over-crimping.

    I think the lesson here is not to load hot rounds for the Glock 40, 45ACP and 357Sig models and use good factory ammo for SD. Who needs hot loads for target shooting anyway.

    PS...I haven't been able to find a tactical holster either. I'm trying to convince myself to buy a G21SF and set it up with a light/laser and keep the 30SF for concealed carry.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by rrc1962 View Post
    I was reading through this thread and was going to suggest the G30. I also went with a G30SF with night sights. It's a great gun. I already have a 9mm, so 40S&W was just too close. There is another issue to consider with 40S&W if you reload. Glock pistols have an unsupported chambers. That means that a very small portion of the casing near the base is unsupported. After a round is fired, that unsupported area can bulge out and weaken. If you reload the same round and the same weakened area chambers in the same location, it can blow out.

    The problem is most prevalent in 40S&W and there have been instances of +P and +P+ factory rounds failing. I recently bought a S&W Sigma not knowing that it has the same chamber design. I sold the gun the next day mostly because I don't want a gun that I can't reload ammo for. More than a few people have told me that the problem exists more in 40S&W because it is higher pressure round than 45ACP and more susceptible to over-seating or over-crimping.

    I think the lesson here is not to load hot rounds for the Glock 40, 45ACP and 357Sig models and use good factory ammo for SD. Who needs hot loads for target shooting anyway.

    PS...I haven't been able to find a tactical holster either. I'm trying to convince myself to buy a G21SF and set it up with a light/laser and keep the 30SF for concealed carry.

    You run the risk of cases blowing out regardless of the caliber and model of firearm they're used in. My recommendation is to not reload the brass too many times. I'll reload brass a maximum of 4 times regardless what I'm shooting. My hunting rounds in my Ruger 77 .270 cal are all reloads. I mark my brass each time it's reloaded so I'll know how many times it has been reloaded. After the 4th time the brass is either recycled or made into something useful (I've been making stuff like ear rings and key rings). Between my buddies and I, we've fired literally THOUSANDS of reloads and only had a few problems, mostly ruptured cases but nothing serious like a "blow out".

    I know one guy who reloads his brass as many as 30 times. I won't go that far, that's just way too risky for me. He often has ruptured cases or other fairly serious malfunctions. Frankly I think the guy's outta his mind.

    I wouldn't even bother with a Sigma. Read too many "bad" things about it. Shot a couple of them while "shopping" (couple of friends were trying to convince me that it was a "good" gun). Didn't like the trigger and the gun made a funny "clinking" sound when fired.

    As for Glock pistols, they're very well made and have a solid track record. Like any piece of equipment, they have their share of problems. If you follow the manufacturer's recommendations, you'll have no problems. Note that Glock does recommend against shooting reloads through their pistols. By doing so you are assuming the risk for whatever happens. Think of it in terms of your automobile. If the manufacturer recommends that you use "high octane" fuel (like premium) and you use "regular unleaded", you run the risk of developing problems with your car. Firearms are the same way. If the manufacturer recommends a certain type of ammo, then it's best to follow their recommendations. I have an Advantage Arms conversion kit for my Glock 23 or Glock 19. The kit came with instructions that recommended that I use certain brands of ammo. If I use the recommended ammo, no problems. Once I begin using ammo that's "standard velocity", I get all kinds of problems.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

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