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Thread: A couple of questions from a newbie

  1. #11
    OK, here's another question - how long should you go before replacing the ammo? I remember reading in American Rifleman years ago that the powder granuals in the cartridges can break down over time from jostling around, especially if the firearm is kept in a glove box or center console. Apparently as the powder breaks down into smaller particles it could develop dangerous pressure levels. I know this from my black powder shooting days - that smaller grain powders burn at a faster rate, generating higher pressure. So does this breakdown really happen and, if so, how long should one carry the same ammo before replacing it? And should it be fired or disposed of in some other manner?

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by AvidshooterTX View Post
    OK, here's another question - how long should you go before replacing the ammo? I remember reading in American Rifleman years ago that the powder granuals in the cartridges can break down over time from jostling around, especially if the firearm is kept in a glove box or center console. Apparently as the powder breaks down into smaller particles it could develop dangerous pressure levels. I know this from my black powder shooting days - that smaller grain powders burn at a faster rate, generating higher pressure. So does this breakdown really happen and, if so, how long should one carry the same ammo before replacing it? And should it be fired or disposed of in some other manner?
    Really good question.

    That one I think I'm going to send along to the ammo manufacturers and I'll post the results when I get a response. I'll send to Federal, Hornady, and Remington and see if they concur.
    You can give peace a chance alright..

    I'll seek cover in case it goes badly..

  4. #13
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    From the tech folks at Federal regarding the ammo question.

    Q: I have a general question regarding ammunition and how long it is good
    for. I have heard that if ammunition is carried (on a person or in a vehicle)
    for a long period of time it is possible for the grains of powder charge
    to break down or apart into smaller pieces. The smaller pieces can burn
    more rapidly and increase pressure. Is this information accurate? I can
    see how it could be possible. Please advise.

    A: Store reloading components and ammunition in a cool, dry place,
    protected from direct exposure to sunlight. If stored properly there is
    a 10-year shelf life on loaded ammunition

    Not exactly what I was hoping for...

    Yet to hear from the others so will post when I do..

    Peace...
    You can give peace a chance alright..

    I'll seek cover in case it goes badly..

  5. #14
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    From the tech folks at Remington regarding the ammo question.

    Q: I have a general question regarding ammunition and how long it is good
    for. I have heard that if ammunition is carried (on a person or in a vehicle)
    for a long period of time it is possible for the grains of powder charge
    to break down or apart into smaller pieces. The smaller pieces can burn
    more rapidly and increase pressure. Is this information accurate? I can
    see how it could be possible. Please advise.

    A: Yes,
    this is a real concern, however if stored correctly and not abused with heavy vibration for extended periods of time, and not exposed to high variations of temperature or humidity you generally have a shelf life of about 10 years before this will become a major concern.

    Ah ha, They took the time to read the entire question... So there you have it...
    You can give peace a chance alright..

    I'll seek cover in case it goes badly..

  6. #15
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    On another note. I was given a box of old Remington police issue 38 specials from back in the late 60's to early 70's. I knew the guys uncle was a cop and he said they were department issue at that time. They had been stored in a clean dry basement in the original box and had never been wet. I took them to the range to see what would happen. I used my model 65 357 Mag.
    49 went BANG and 1 was a dud. I hit it twice with the hammer and no go. needless to say I waited 2 minutes to unload that one...
    You can give peace a chance alright..

    I'll seek cover in case it goes badly..

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6shootercarry View Post
    On another note. I was given a box of old Remington police issue 38 specials from back in the late 60's to early 70's. I knew the guys uncle was a cop and he said they were department issue at that time. They had been stored in a clean dry basement in the original box and had never been wet. I took them to the range to see what would happen. I used my model 65 357 Mag.
    49 went BANG and 1 was a dud. I hit it twice with the hammer and no go. needless to say I waited 2 minutes to unload that one...
    You'll be surprisd how long ammo can last. With proper care and storage, it can be rather long. I recently shot up 2 ammo cans worth of WWII .45 ACP cartridges without a problem. I have .22 LR cartridges from the same time period. I'm planning on shooting up the .22 in the next month or so. Being that it's a rim fired cartridge, I wouldn't be surprised if there are at least a couple of misfires.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glock Fan View Post
    Being that it's a rim fired cartridge, I wouldn't be surprised if there are at least a couple of misfires.

    gf
    I don't think I have ever shot a brick of .22 without at lease 3 or 4 misfires and that is new ammo.
    Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same. - Ronald Reagan

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by MADnMO View Post
    I don't think I have ever shot a brick of .22 without at lease 3 or 4 misfires and that is new ammo.
    I primarily shoot CCI Mini-Mag ammo. Most rounds we fired in a class before a misfire was approx. 2,000 rounds. Turned the cartridge 1/4 turn, reloaded, and it went bang.

    OTOH, I've shot bricks of CCI Blazer ammo and got an average of 1 misfire per 500 rounds. These misfires are "duds" as we turn the cartridge 1/4 turn twice and it still won't go bang. After pulling the bullet and examining the case, we notice that there is either very little or no priming compound in the crimp area.

    Seems like the cost of the ammo is directly related to the number of duds in the batch.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  10. #19
    I try to shoot off my carry ammo at least once every six monthes.

    The crime rate here is low enough that that forces me to go to the shooting range at least twice a year.

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