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Thread: Citizen's Arrest

  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Booga View Post
    In WA, you can protect others who are in danger. They need not be friends or relatives.
    Yes I understand some states laws are writen this way, BUT would you want to be a test case for shooting some A*S***E for beating up his wife with a baseball bat ? and I admit seeing this happen I would be tempted to put a couple of caps in his ass, but it would be a given, if you were in the right and the DA did not see it this way, the whole deal would cost you a LOT,

  2.   
  3. Rocketgeezer, I have already been through a similar scenario to this.

    My neighbor's girlfriend showed up on my doorstep after being beaten, and the first thing I did was bring her inside, dial 911 and lock the door. I had my gun prepared to defend her from further injury. If that bastard had busted down the door into my house he'd have to make a real fast choice between submission, retreat, or a trip to the hospital or morgue.

    If the threat is over, I will not take the fight to the assailant or track them down. That's the job the cops are hired for. But if they come to me, it's another story.

    Well known to just about everyone is the saying, "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."

    I will not stand by and let someone who has turned to me for help be assaulted/killed.

    I understand it may cost me a lot, but that cost is less than the loss of life of the person saved.

  4. #53
    +1 Boomboy--I agree with 100% of what you said!

  5. #54
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    Originally Posted by Boomboy007
    Honestly, there are several bad choices in your scenario, starting with when you got dressed. Seriously.

    If you woke up that morning, strapped on a sidearm, and finished the ensemble off with handcuffs (metal, zip-tie, whatever), you are just asking to be jammed up in court. Heaven forbid you actually encounter a situation where you are forced to defend your life with your firearm, the DA is going to have a good time turning you into a vigilante, cop-wanna-be running around with a gun and handcuffs. To top off that outfit, one only needs one of those Conceal Carry badges that we have discussed on other threads. This would look REALLY BAD to the average jury.

    When I open carry, I always have my conceal carry badge on my belt, next to my cuff's just like those TV cops. It really impress's the chicks who work in the donut shop.

  6. #55
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    Thank you booga, thank you booga, thank you booga. After reading many of the replies to this thread I was getting a bit disgusted with the vibes I was getting from fellow forum users. In all honesty, I do not believe the "macho" repliers in your scenario, would slam the door on the lady and tell her to go fly a kite. If they would, I truly have nothing but contempt for them. We are not talking about taking on the role of saviour for every little "incident" out there; we are talking about common sense, about some compassion and, in the extreme case, witnessing the "imminent peril of death or great bodily injury", having the ability to do "something" (even if it just to call 911) about it, and then walking away as if nothing is happening. Disgusting.

  7. *Thinking of the right words to say, to avoid another trip through the inferno.*

    Kelcarry, I agree with you 100%, but just like most groups, including the police and military, concealed carriers have a very broad range in their sense of duty. For some, their duty is solely for the protection of themselves, and their family. On the other end of the spectrum, you have some very hard core vigilantes. Most are somewhere in the middle, and I personally don't think it's very good to be on either side of the extremes. Now I know I've definitely made it seem like I'm more of a vigilante with my OP, but I've learned from the responses, even though some I may disagree with. I don't go looking for trouble, and I don't go trekking into places I wouldn't normally without a weapon. I simply want to be as prepared as possible, for a variety of scenarios. Unfortunately, the legal system, and anti-gun supporters, love to find ways to screw over our fellow citizens, and thus we have our different beliefs in carry protocol.

    As I've said in other posts, I am a firm believer in the sheepdog concept. I've had the sheepdog mentality ever since I was a kid. After Columbine, I'd often rehearse in my head what I would do if an active shooter came into the school, and how I could save as many lives as possible. I don't want to be a hero, and I certainly don't want praise. I just cannot abide watching my fellow man suffer while I have an ability to help. After high school, I enlisted, once again because of that same mentality.

    Now that I have a concealed permit, I feel it is my own sense of duty to protect those who cannot protect themselves. If I'm at a mall, and someone starts shooting, I wouldn't be able to run out, and then stand there, knowing people are being slaughtered on the inside. Then again if I interfered, there's the possibility that I could shoot the wrong guy, hit a bystander, or get mistaken for the bad guy, and shot by another carrier. That's why keeping all aspects of your life and training rounded out is of most importance. So if that horrible day comes down to you, you're able to assess the situation, decide on a course of action, and execute that plan with precision. We're all professionals in the end, with an extremely high amount of responsibility.

    So, in the end (hopefully sparing you all from another autobiography), I think people should be focused on making up scenarios. Who cares if you get flamed, or your actions disagreed with? If you can't take some heavy criticism, or are afraid of speaking out because of the possibilities of looking like an idiot, you shouldn't be carrying a gun.

  8. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aresye View Post
    *Thinking of the right words to say, to avoid another trip through the inferno.*

    Kelcarry, I agree with you 100%, but just like most groups, including the police and military, concealed carriers have a very broad range in their sense of duty. For some, their duty is solely for the protection of themselves, and their family. On the other end of the spectrum, you have some very hard core vigilantes. Most are somewhere in the middle, and I personally don't think it's very good to be on either side of the extremes. Now I know I've definitely made it seem like I'm more of a vigilante with my OP, but I've learned from the responses, even though some I may disagree with. I don't go looking for trouble, and I don't go trekking into places I wouldn't normally without a weapon. I simply want to be as prepared as possible, for a variety of scenarios. Unfortunately, the legal system, and anti-gun supporters, love to find ways to screw over our fellow citizens, and thus we have our different beliefs in carry protocol.

    As I've said in other posts, I am a firm believer in the sheepdog concept. I've had the sheepdog mentality ever since I was a kid. After Columbine, I'd often rehearse in my head what I would do if an active shooter came into the school, and how I could save as many lives as possible. I don't want to be a hero, and I certainly don't want praise. I just cannot abide watching my fellow man suffer while I have an ability to help. After high school, I enlisted, once again because of that same mentality.

    Now that I have a concealed permit, I feel it is my own sense of duty to protect those who cannot protect themselves. If I'm at a mall, and someone starts shooting, I wouldn't be able to run out, and then stand there, knowing people are being slaughtered on the inside. Then again if I interfered, there's the possibility that I could shoot the wrong guy, hit a bystander, or get mistaken for the bad guy, and shot by another carrier. That's why keeping all aspects of your life and training rounded out is of most importance. So if that horrible day comes down to you, you're able to assess the situation, decide on a course of action, and execute that plan with precision. We're all professionals in the end, with an extremely high amount of responsibility.

    So, in the end (hopefully sparing you all from another autobiography), I think people should be focused on making up scenarios. Who cares if you get flamed, or your actions disagreed with? If you can't take some heavy criticism, or are afraid of speaking out because of the possibilities of looking like an idiot, you shouldn't be carrying a gun.
    I sleep better at night, knowing you are out there protecting those who can't protect themselves.

  9. #58
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    Hey iceman: Methinks I sense sarcasm in your last post. If not, I apologize. As said in some of the replies, if the "shoe is on the other foot" I'm sure you would be grateful for any assistance you or your family would receive from others to prevent your untimely death or that of your family members. I would hope and truly believe that the posts and replies on this thread are being written while at a computer, where the real world and your friends, neighbors and others are not in front of you as they are being subjected to great bodily injury or even possible death, as you walk away singing a favorite tune.

  10. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelcarry View Post
    Hey iceman: Methinks I sense sarcasm in your last post. If not, I apologize. As said in some of the replies, if the "shoe is on the other foot" I'm sure you would be grateful for any assistance you or your family would receive from others to prevent your untimely death or that of your family members. I would hope and truly believe that the posts and replies on this thread are being written while at a computer, where the real world and your friends, neighbors and others are not in front of you as they are being subjected to great bodily injury or even possible death, as you walk away singing a favorite tune.
    Yesterday, I returned to the library. Masad Ahoob's "in the gravest extreme". Excellent reading. Some good ideas. The points made regarding avoiding trouble while armed come to mind. I consider that book a must for anyone who owns a firearm for self defense.

  11. There's a big difference between looking for trouble, and an intervention. At least in my mind, but I know there's others who feel the same way.

    I'm not advocating that somebody should be going out on patrol at night, or to areas you wouldn't normally go unarmed. That's just not a smart idea to begin with. What I'm really trying to emphasize, is that as a concealed carrier, you may one day be placed in a situation in which you are the first responder, and since the majority of your fellow citizens are likely unarmed, chances are you are the only person who has a defensive option. Some people on this board have a belief that everybody has an opportunity to be armed, but they choose not to, and therefore are left to deal with the consequences facing that action. Why fight somebody else's fight, right?

    There's a lot of people who are not eligible to carry, whether it's because of age, local laws, or even a prior offense. They all share one thing in common, and that is the basic human right of life itself. We have no greater right to that same right as any of our unarmed citizens. I'd rather be at peace with myself in jail, knowing I saved a life, than trying to fall asleep at night wondering how many of those lives I could have saved, if I had chosen to intervene.

    The current legal system and a lot of the population are all screwy. I acknowledge that. I'm afraid though, that the fear of legal fallout from an intervention, is beginning to cause many of us to think twice about interfering in the first place, and the ones that would have gone in harms way, are ridiculed both by anti-gun fanatics, and people on this board. Does your fear of legal repercussion outweigh the right for another to live? How would you feel if a loved one was killed in a mass-shooting, only to learn later that a concealed carrier was there, but chose to call the cops, and stay out of the situation? On the other hand, if your loved one was not there, the choice this carrier made to stand clear would likely be met with praise, for not fighting somebody else's fight, or for avoiding potential legal consequences. If it ever comes down to a situation where an innocent life hangs in your choice to act, I hope most of you would choose to act, and not let their fellow human being die, because they're afraid of the legal system.

    Just something to think about. I guess I sure am a crazy vigilante/wannabe cop who goes out on patrol at night, looking for trouble.





    Or maybe I just simply care about others over my own well-being.

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