1 round in chamber? or not? - Page 7
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Thread: 1 round in chamber? or not?

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by alonzo_rt View Post
    Waiting on CHL but I was wondering how many of you actually have a round in the chamber when you carry? the instructor recommended doing so for overall quickness if necessary, but Im not sure. My gun has a thumb safety and the trigger with the safety lever. Just wondering overall what you all think.
    Now to each their own, but in my pistols, rifles and shotguns rarely is a round in the chamber. In my revolvers the hammer sits on an empty chamber.

    Again, as I said in another quote, how much time does it take to either pull the hammer back or jack a round into a chamber? We are talking miniscule seconds here.

    I had an incident the other day where I felt I may have to use my LCP in our defense. So, I did jack a round into the chamber and then I am in a situation of no physical safety to rely upon, except my intelligence.

    BTW, I carry almost 100% of the time. Exception is duly recognized buildings, etc.

    The possible emergency passed without any action required and I therefore ejected the clip, opened the breech, caught the unspent round, inserted that round back into the clip and all was well.

    Even with my weapons that have a physical safety, I do not recommend that a round be kept in the chamber. Of course, that is my choice and others will have different choices.
    Last edited by Garand; 02-02-2011 at 03:38 PM. Reason: adding on

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  3. #62
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Texas, for now
    Posts
    57
    If you're concerned about an negligent discharge and are not confident in your ability to carry your weapon loaded (like I was at first), try this:

    Cock the weapon (mine's a XDm 45) but without one in the chamber, loaded magazine. If you ever find the gun not cocked, it's went off. After several weeks of this it became apparent that it wasn't going to go off. Now I have one in the chamber. I just had to mentally remind myself that the gun is now really loaded and have retrained myself in it's handling.

    If, after a month or so of this, you are still afraid to carry your weapon with one in the pipe, then question if you should be carrying at all.

  4. #63

    Carry a round in the chamber

    Surprising question.

    It is entirely up to you. I hope we never travel together because if something bad happens and I am firing shots trying to protect us I really don't want to see you trying to chamber a cartridge while you are being shot at.

    But if that is what you choose please do alot of practice in unholstering your pistol, chambering a round and then get a good sight picture and remember we may be moving away from the threat or moving towards it. You have alot of things to accomplish while you are chambering.

    By that time I may be ready to reload my pistol, and you can shoot for awhile.

    Seriously now, it is up to your level of perceived competence what you do.

    Mine are loaded and ready to fire and I also pray that I will never have to use them. But if I do, my mind is going to be so busy with my moving around, trying not to get shot, looking at the background being sure that there is no innocent bystander around and looking for cover and/or concealment.

    Get a lightweight revolver in the 357 cal or use 38 spec +P+ rounds and you don't have to worry about chambering a round. The pistol is always ready. But most of all you will be able to carry it without a heavy weight burden on your body.

    Pat Olvey
    email [email protected]

  5. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by Garand View Post
    I had an incident the other day where I felt I may have to use my LCP in our defense. So, I did jack a round into the chamber and then I am in a situation of no physical safety to rely upon, except my intelligence.

    BTW, I carry almost 100% of the time. Exception is duly recognized buildings, etc.

    The possible emergency passed without any action required and I therefore ejected the clip, opened the breech, caught the unspent round, inserted that round back into the clip and all was well.
    The LCP does not use a "clip" to load or feed ammunition, its ammunition is stored in a detachable magazine. AFAIK, the only pistol that did use a clip to load ammo was the WWI era Mauser Broomhandle. I seriously doubt very many people carry a Mauser Broomhandle.

  6. Quote Originally Posted by G50AE View Post
    The LCP does not use a "clip" to load or feed ammunition, its ammunition is stored in a detachable magazine. AFAIK, the only pistol that did use a clip to load ammo was the WWI era Mauser Broomhandle. I seriously doubt very many people carry a Mauser Broomhandle.
    Actually, it does use a clip:

    Clip - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary

    2 : a device to hold cartridges for charging the magazines of some rifles; also : a magazine from which ammunition is fed into the chamber of a firearm
    NRA-ILA :: Firearms Glossary

    CLIP
    A device for holding a group of cartridges. Semantic wars have been fought over the word, with some insisting it is not a synonym for "detachable magazine." For 80 years, however, it has been so used by manufacturers and the military. There is no argument that it can also mean a separate device for holding and transferring a group of cartridges to a fixed or detachable magazine or as a device inserted with cartridges into the mechanism of a firearm becoming, in effect, part of that mechanism.
    Merriam Webster and the NRA both agree that "clip" is synonymous for "magazine".

  7. #66
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    29
    I carry with one in the chamber.

  8. #67
    No sense carrying a gun for SD if you have to take time to load a round before firing ... practice takes care of getting the safety off and if you get a good DA semi, you don't even have to do that ... modern guns are designed so it's almost (almost!) impossible to fire one unless that's your intention ... don't carry if you're scared to do it right ...
    "Neatness counts, but bullets often count more." Elvis Cole, World's Greatest Detective

  9. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by Garand View Post
    Now to each their own, but in my pistols, rifles and shotguns rarely is a round in the chamber. In my revolvers the hammer sits on an empty chamber. ...
    Posts #2 and #6, the ones with the youtube clips, point out the problems with this method of carry. In #6, the instinctive shooting video, the man is smoothly chambering a round during the draw while at the range. In #2, the woman is trying to draw and defend herself in a very realistic simulation of a real world self defense situation.

    Real world attackers rush you. They may or may not have weapons of their own, not necessarily guns but possibly knives, bludgeons (pipes, ball bats, bricks, etc.) or even fists backed by large muscular bodies. The hand you're using (or intending to use) to chamber that round could have been the hand you used to fend off that attack to give you time to draw and shoot.

    As for keeping an empty chamber under the revolver's hammer, unless you're carrying an old pre-68 pot metal cheapie or a single-action Peacemaker copy, there is probably a passive hammer block or a transfer bar safety preventing that hammer from contacting the firing pin or primer unless the trigger is pulled fully back. The only thing you're achieving with that empty chamber is depriving yourself of a possibly needed extra shot.

    Someone else mentioned familiarizing yourself with how your gun operates and that is an excellent suggestion that goes beyond simply knowing how to load it and make it go bang. The next time you field strip it for routine cleaning, look at the various internal parts and notice the built-in safety devices and how they work. My 1932-designed Walther PPK/S, for instance, has a total of three safety mechanisms, a hammer block that keeps the hammer from going fully forward unless the trigger is held back, a thumb safety that prevents the hammer from being able to strike the firing pin, and a firing pin block that prevents the firing pin from moving when the thumb safety is applied. The 100-year old Govt. 1911 pistol has a grip safety that prevents trigger movement unless the gun is held in a firing grip, a thumb safety that locks the sear into the hammer's sear notch, and a half-cock notch to catch the hammer should the other two safeties fail. The various Glock-style striker-fired pistols will generally have a firing pin/striker block that prevents the firing pin/strike from going forward unless the trigger is fully pulled to the rear as well as no way for said striker to be hit by any outside objects. Check out your gun's safety mechanisms and gain the trust and confidence to carry it fully loaded the way it was intended to be carried.

    And, finally, I know of at least one other handgun than the Mauser broomhandle that used a clip. I used to shoot PPC with a guy who used a Steyr M1912 with a fixed magazine that loaded from 8rd. stripper clips.

  10. #69
    If you are not goin carry with one in the chamber why not just carry it w/o the mag. Keep the mag in another pocket and the bullets in another pocket. So when the time comes simply say time out. Load the mag, insert the mag then rack the slide and then.

  11. Quote Originally Posted by Chadwilliam1 View Post
    If you are not goin carry with one in the chamber why not just carry it w/o the mag. Keep the mag in another pocket and the bullets in another pocket. So when the time comes simply say time out. Load the mag, insert the mag then rack the slide and then.
    Dude, he's not in CALIFORNIA!

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