Shooting low left - Page 2
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Thread: Shooting low left

  1. #11
    handgonnetoter Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by NRA Lifer and Proud View Post
    I would let someone else shoot this pistol to see if it's the pistol or something you are doing.
    Thats usually what I do. What kind of hand gun is it? Does it have a "heavy" trigger? Me being right handed, if the gun has a heavy trigger that is, tends to make me shoot a little left. I find, with me anyway, if the gun has a heavy trigger then I will use the distal joint of the trigger finger and get better results. JMHO.

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  3. #12
    It's a S&W M&P 9c. Sorry I should have mentioned that.

  4. #13
    You may want to call a couple ranges to see if they have a pistol bench. If they have a smith on hand they should. This way you can verify if the sites are aligned our need to be adjusted.

  5. #14
    Thanks everyone for the info!!

  6. The best way I know to diagnose and get rid of trigger-jerk is the dummy-and-ball drill. Have a training partner load your gun, or not load it, and hand it to you - you won't know which. Your job is to press the trigger without jerking it at all. It's uncanny how, when you don't know if the gun will go "click" or "bang", your trigger-jerk becomes obvious. It's important to have more empty chambers than loaded and by the end of the drill you'll have your hole in the center of the target.

  7. #16
    Great info! I am picking up some "dummy rounds" tomorrow. My local gun shop was out of them the other day. Hopefully this will help. I don't believe it is the gun since my husband had no trouble with it. We are going shooting this weekend with a few friends that have a lot more experience with guns. This should help. Again thanks for the info!!

  8. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    MA, Away from the liberal loonies...
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcarmody View Post
    The best way I know to diagnose and get rid of trigger-jerk is the dummy-and-ball drill. Have a training partner load your gun, or not load it, and hand it to you - you won't know which. Your job is to press the trigger without jerking it at all. It's uncanny how, when you don't know if the gun will go "click" or "bang", your trigger-jerk becomes obvious. It's important to have more empty chambers than loaded and by the end of the drill you'll have your hole in the center of the target.
    I did this with a friend of mine new to shooting.. M&P40c snappy little bugger... I loaded it and put a dummy in the magazine..
    I caught him 3 times pushing the gun low and away... And he knew it.. dry fire it with a dummy load until it feels natural...

    Time/practice (with good habits) will cure things like this... I did the same when last at the gun club... A member there offered me his .44Mag to shoot with some of his hand loads. I knew it was gonna kick at me.. Pushed the first 2 shots low... Grrrrr, shook my head and took my time on the trigger... Next 4 were better... Get some instruction if possible, from members of a range or club if you are a member...
    You can give peace a chance alright..

    I'll seek cover in case it goes badly..

  9. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by kotaNsid View Post
    Great info! I am picking up some "dummy rounds" tomorrow. My local gun shop was out of them the other day. Hopefully this will help.
    Dummy rounds are an item that should be in every shooter's arsenal of tools, no pun intended.

  10. Frank hit a good point and Retired Grunt posted up the chart which is very useful.

    Dry fire practice can be a wonderful thing. Snap caps (dummy rounds) seem to work well for some, but they're not for everyone.

    A little cheater technique that was given to me when I had to learn to shoot "pumpkin on a post" with the Beretta 92FS was to put a #2 pencil (shapened) eraser first into the muzzle end (if it fits) of a completely unloaded pistol. Post up a target within your normal line-of-sight on a wall. Get up close and personal with the target, 2-6 inches away is far enough. Make the firearm ready (hammer back, striker readied, etc), then pull the trigger. If the pencil is fully rearward when the trigger is pulled, the pencil should come out of the barrel and place a mark on the paper. This is where RG's chart can come in VERY handy.

    Any way you go about it, dry fire practice is an important learning tool.

  11. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    ElK Creek Kentucky
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    437
    You can use a gun rest, correcting your grip as you go.

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