Employee pulls gun during Wal-Mart produce dispute - Page 2
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Thread: Employee pulls gun during Wal-Mart produce dispute

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by cawpin View Post
    First, "most states"is a bit of a stretch I think. I've actually never seen a state that forbids employees from carrying.

    Second, it doesn't sound like he was working when this happened, just happened to be an employee.
    In most cases it's the employers not letting their drones carry at work, so the state laws won't even come into play. And considering that every workplace has it's numbers of idiots and alcertations I can not entirely disagree with that.

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  3. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Northern Oklahoma
    Posts
    71
    I live in Catoosa County, and I have gone to the Fort O Wal-Mart. To be Honest none of this suprises me! That store is the worst Wal-Mart I have ever been in! I have a friend from collage that works in corprate, i have contacted her to complain about the Fort O store, to the point that she has told me that it is better for me not to go to that store. People enter that Wal-mart and lose all their minds! I go out of my way to go to Wal-mart or Sam's Club in Chattanooga, But if i do have to go to the Fort O location I always CC.

  4. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    State of Confusion
    Posts
    7,733
    More food for the Brady bunch. Smarten-up people!
    GOD, GUNS and GUITARS

  5. Question Art Linkletter wants to know the rest of the story.

    The journalist needs writing and reporting lessons. "Stepped in" has no clear meaning. Is Luther Lawson on medical leave because of this incident or for another reason? I take it that the "exchange of words" was more hostile than "excuse me". Still it would take awfully provoking words, body language, and movement to warrant presenting a weapon.

    This looks like a first to press news release...Art Linkletter wants to know the rest of the story.

  6. In most cases it's the employers not letting their drones carry at work, so the state laws won't even come into play. And considering that every workplace has its numbers of idiots and altercations I can not entirely disagree with that.
    FWIW, I work for a large municipal utility in a large Politically Correct Northwestern city. We, of course, have a PC "no weapons" policy. Back in the later 1970's, when I actually worked IN the city (instead of 130 miles away from it), co-workers came to me for advice on what to carry and how to carry it. The primary concern was people who worked alone being assaulted when doing their jobs, particularly in bad neighborhoods. These things sometimes happened. Over the years, I've heard of one or two female employees who carried because they feared co-workers.

    In recent years, a claimed emphasis on "NERC required security" (in reality, employee surveillance; NERC requirements can be met with doors that lock and a sign-in log) has resulted in cameras everywhere, electronic card key locks in place of "real" locks. These card keys are often programmed by jerks who have no business in a plant, so plant Operators who always had to let visitors in can now be surprised by a herd of strangers in the Control Room. The electronic latches often don't latch. There's a growing concern about the actual lack of security caused by all this insanity. Today, I would not hazard a guess about who carries and who does not. But I can tell you that "bosses" of almost all sorts absolutely hate armed employees (somtimes with good reason; research Postal shootings and you'll always find a sadistic boss who had made that employee's life a living hell for years until he finally snapped).

    You will find VERY FEW employers who encourage employees to be armed. You will find MANY who go do far as to fire an employee who has a hunting rifle locked in the trunk of his car in the company parking lot. I am certain there are NO good figures for how many carry at work, because almost nobody who does will ever admit it.

    And you know that mainstream news reporting will always slant the report very heavily against any armed citizen. In the above report, it may well be that the older gentleman got no further than saying "excuse me," before the husband in the story threatened him with violence. We were not there.
    “The police of a State should never be stronger or better armed than the citizenry. An armed citizenry, willing to fight is the foundation of civil freedom.” Heinlein

  7. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    GA but a resident of TN
    Posts
    170
    Well I for one have to agree with the 2 sides to every story. I find it hard to believe the husband just said excuse me and firearm was drawn. On the other hand maybe he was having a very bad day or this or that. we can speculate all day on what really happened.

    As far as carrying at work, I dont but I also work on a military installation. :-( If per state law I could legally carry at work and the employer wished for me to remain unarmed than that is where concealed means concealed let no one know about it and only use it if necessary. If and when the time comes that you need your firearm, than being fired is going to be the last thing on your mind and will matter if you get fired or not if you just survived a deadly situation?
    "The purpose of war is not to die for your country. The purpose of war is to ensure that the other guy dies for his country." - General Patton

  8. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Carolina/Charleston
    Posts
    2,388
    Hey nogods and Axe45: Threatened and you present a firearm? "Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never harm me". Definitely disagree that a firearm is necessary at that point---now if threatened includes a knife or the brandishing of a firearm on his waist--fine, I agree. If it is only stupid talk and yelling etal--no way do you present a firearm. PS: Whatever happened to a brandishing charge, although they may name it differently in GA.

  9. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by cawpin View Post
    First, "most states"is a bit of a stretch I think. I've actually never seen a state that forbids employees from carrying.
    Me neither, even if you sign a policy saying you won't carry (which I've signed a couple times.....and ignored) your only breaking company rules it's not illegal.

  10. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by snatale42 View Post
    Me neither, even if you sign a policy saying you won't carry (which I've signed a couple times.....and ignored) your only breaking company rules it's not illegal.
    In the end it really comes down to how badly you need/want to keep your job. I was looking for a job when I was hired and can easily do it again. I have never carried at work,but I kept it in the car.

    THEY MAY TAKE OUR LIVES BUT THEY'LL NEVER TAKE OUR FREEDOM!!!!!

  11. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by S&WM&P40 View Post
    In the end it really comes down to how badly you need/want to keep your life. I was looking for a job when I was hired and can easily do it again. I have never carried at work,but I kept it in the car.
    Fixed it.
    Billy

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