First gun recommendations & considerations
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Thread: First gun recommendations & considerations

  1. First gun recommendations & considerations

    Hey all!

    New to the forums here and just looking for some adviceÖ Iíve been shooting rentals on and off since I was 18 but finally decided to go ahead and get my CCW permit and my own gun.

    While Iím waiting for the wheels to turn on the permit paperwork, Iíve been researching what firearm to purchase first. This gun will be for both home defense and concealed carry. Iíve narrowed down the field to either a gen 3 Glock 26, or a Kahr PM9 /CM9.

    Iím leaning toward the Glock because of its reliability, capacity and because it accepts .22 conversion slides, so I can run cheaper ammo through it while still practicing on the same frame.

    The Kahr comes in a close second on the reliability front, from what I hear, but its major advantage is its size and slimness compared to the Glock. Iím just afraid that the Glock will be too chunky for decent and comfortable concealed carry.
    Any thought suggestions or any other considerations I should be looking for?

    Thanks in advance!

  2.   
  3. I would go with the Glock 26. I own one and I love it I've had it for about a year and it has bot let me down. I own Glock 17 for about 12 years and I have never up till now had a malfunction. So for reliabilty I vote Glock 26.
    Quote Originally Posted by thevinmanfxst View Post
    Hey all!

    New to the forums here and just looking for some adviceÖ Iíve been shooting rentals on and off since I was 18 but finally decided to go ahead and get my CCW permit and my own gun.

    While Iím waiting for the wheels to turn on the permit paperwork, Iíve been researching what firearm to purchase first. This gun will be for both home defense and concealed carry. Iíve narrowed down the field to either a gen 3 Glock 26, or a Kahr PM9 /CM9.

    Iím leaning toward the Glock because of its reliability, capacity and because it accepts .22 conversion slides, so I can run cheaper ammo through it while still practicing on the same frame.

    The Kahr comes in a close second on the reliability front, from what I hear, but its major advantage is its size and slimness compared to the Glock. Iím just afraid that the Glock will be too chunky for decent and comfortable concealed carry.
    Any thought suggestions or any other considerations I should be looking for?

    Thanks in advance!

  4. #3
    I have owned several glocks, they are nice.
    But when I got a springfield xd, my first thought was this is what a glock should be.

    Personally, 1911 designs are my weapon of choice. Over tupperware guns.

  5. #4
    I myself bought a glock for reliability, ease of use, and the fact its the same firearm local authorities use around here and its the firearm I will use in police academy. I have fired aprox 300 rounds through it so far and it hasn't jammed once. I also bought it because it has no saftey. I know I may sound crazy, but if theres a situation were I need to use my gun, I dont want to have to mess with a safety. I dont have kids around so its not a big deal. My vote is for the glock.

  6. #5
    I have nothing against Glocks at all, but i would recommend a full size 1911 to you, with the right holster there easy to conceal.

  7. #6
    I recomend a 1911 as well but go with an officers or defender size as they are a bit easier to conceal.

  8. carry gun

    What do you guys think of a Crimson carry 2?

  9. Here we go again. The right gun for you is the right gun for YOU. You say you have been renting firearms? good. Keep doing so. Try them in various calibers and lengths find something that is comfortable for you to shoot. There are various ways to go about this but I usually recommend settling brand first. It should feel comfortable in your hands, point well and serve your needs in terms of concealability. Once you decide for yourself which platform you are comfortable with, begin looking at caliber. Try your chosen pistol in all calibers in which it is available if possible. You want something that you can afford to practice with regularly.

    A word on the use of .22 conversion kits for practice, there is an adage I learned while in the military "train as you fight". In this case I would interpret this to mean actually practicing with ammunition that resembles your carry load as much as possible. This will allow you to strengthen your grip improve your accuracy and overall become accustomed to how your pistol operates in the field. .22 conversions can be good for learning overall function of your pistol such as how to perfom reloads, and operation of safeties, practicing draws, etc. However much of this sort of training can also be done with dry firing alone, or with dummy rounds. (With significantly improved safety) There may be some differing opinions on this point however. There are certainly shooters out there that swear by .22 cal practice. And certainly .22 cal practice is better than no practice at all.

    I would also begin looking at how you are going to carry your pistol. Start with a good solid gunbelt, I prefer 1 1/4" because it does not scream "gun" like a wider 1 1/2" or 2" belt. It also does not require changing the belt loops on your pants. Next see if your gun dealer will allow you to try various holster styles before you buy them. As I have mentioned in other threads a really good holster is the secret to comfortable concealed carry. Try the mass market models to determine a carry location and style that suits you best, understanding that you may need to modify your wardrobe a bit to accommodate concealed carry. Once you have determined a carry style that suits you best, find a high quality custom holster maker that will make a holster in what works for you. Custom holsters generally use higher quality leather which is a bit thicker than mass market versions. They will wear better overtime and not stretch out. The means of attaching the holster to your belt can be sized to fit your belt exactly providing minimum movement and holding the pistol securely against your body but not so close as to be uncomfortable. The boning on a high quality holster will be sufficient to hold a pistol in place and prevent it from falling out.

  10. #9
    Join Date
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    S&W .500 7 inch barrel Bonecollector Edition!

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    glock

    It's a tried and true design. I'm a big guy so I can hide full size autos with comfort. I carry a glock21 if I'm riding a lot. Buy I also carry a Colt Government model otherwise. You need to access your own carry situations to decide what's best for you.

    If your gonna carry a pocket weapon or a belt weapon. If your gonna carry an ankle weapon or a shoulder weapon. I'm fortunate enough that my carry position and weapon is dictated by my mood and more importantly my dress for the day. Except for an ankle weapon, I have never and will never carry there. I'll be damned if I got to kneel before anyone while going for a weapon.

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