Newbie Question
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Thread: Newbie Question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Highland NY
    Posts
    99

    Newbie Question

    Hey Gang - just wanted to get some feedback. I am 48 and just received my CCP a few weeks ago. I live a relatively routine life. Go to my office, sports with the kids (11 and 14), run errands with my wife, yada, yada, yada. Typical suburban scenario. Live in a good area. Now I understand that bad stuff can happen to anyone anywhere and it is better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it, and it is my consitutional right, and all of the other sayings I have read on all of the forums. I am just wondering if it is normal when you first start carrying to feel "paranoid" if you start to carry everywhere legally allowed? I've taken NRA PPOTH, PPITH, a force on force course, as well as the Basic Pistol safety class. Possibly more training then some long time permit holders already and I plan to continue and do as much as I can. I am joining a shooting club with my family next month so I can practice at least monthly and I plan on doing regular dry fire drills in my basement. I had a lot of time to think good and hard while waiting for my permit (almost 5 months here in NY) about carrying a pistol. I do feel that I can pull the trigger if my life or my family's life is ever in danger although I pray I never have to. I have lived this long not needing to do so and I hope to go at least another 48 years the same way. Have any others had these feelings when first starting to carry all the time eventhough you don't feel unsafe? (I know this may be similar to the "Why do you carry concealed" thread so I apologize) Maybe you can call it "carriers remorse" for lack of a better term. Just want to make sure there is nothing weird about me. Thanks for your feedback. Please be gentle!!!!

  2.   
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    60
    First of all congrats on getting your CCP. As a fellow New Yorker I know that isn't the easiest thing to do around here.

    I don't know if I felt paranoid at the beginning, but I remember feeling guilty, like I was doing something wrong. I had to keep telling myself "hey, this is perfectly legal and my right to do". Plus early on I had no training, and had never fired a handgun. I have since joined a shooting club, and have taken some NRA courses; and that has done wonders with my confidence. Like you said, I hope I never have to use it....but I want to be as prepared as possible if I ever have to.
    .........................................
    NYMoose

  4. Jeff you are doing more than anyone can ask you to do, to ensure safe handling of a firearm. The only thing that I will address is your uneasiness about carrying and having remorse about it. Don't. I realize that you are from one of the most Liberal states in the country and that they are PC about everything. They say be remorseful for driving a car. Be remorseful for eating red meat. Be remorseful for building a house out of wood. Be remorseful for breathing and so on and so forth. Shake the PC ******** and just be a courteous, respectful human being and you will get used to carrying a pistol as you would putting on your shoes. I will recommend using an In Waist Band holster or a Belly-Band. I carry a Glock 21 and one would think that is too big of a gun to conceal, but with an IWB, no one notices. Take care.

  5. First you need to figure out if your so-call paranoid.... is you Assessing your surroundings, Awareness of your possibilities with a Tactical mind set... or are you Frighten, worried you may have to act/use your weapon because you lack confidence. The more training you do/get, the more confident & Discipline you become, this gives you an advantage over most people walking about.

  6. I remember it feeling awkward at first. As a matter of fact, for the first few months, I found myself not carrying most of the time.

    It took me 2-3 months (and finding the right carry gun) until I became more comfortable carrying all the time. I started with a Sig P239 and found it to be too heavy. I then switched to an LCR, then to an LCP and finally a Glock 26. I still carry the LCP when I wear dress pants. BTW -- I only pocket carry. ITW was never comfortable for me, but pocket carry is perfect. I wear virtually the same pants or shorts everyday (modified EOTacs), so the "feel" is always the same.

    Keep at it -- the more you carry, the more comfortable you'll be. I now don't even go on a trip to the store without first filling my pockets.

    BTW -- the modifications I did on the EOTac pants and shorts (I have 8 pair of the pants and 9 pair of the shorts) are:

    Right pocket: Purchased some ripstop material and had the pocket lengthened by about two inches. This solves the problem of the G26 being visible when someone is behind me as the gun now sits 2" lower. I also lined the very bottom of the new pocket with velcro hook and all of my pocket holsters have velcro loop sewn across the bottom of them. My holster never comes out when I draw, unless I want it to. This also keeps the pocket holster from turning on its side with those big EOTac pockets (which happened quite a bit before making this modification).

    Left pocket: I created a pocket within a pocket by having about 2.5" of material (closest to the inner thigh) separated from the other side of the pocket with a line of sewing about 3" tall. I place a backup magazine in this "small" pocket.

    S

  7. #6
    I like the way you are approaching all this. You seem to grasp the gravity of carrying. I remember when I started - which was only about a year and a half or so ago - I was hyper aware of the fact that I had a gun with me. I no longer have that sensation; instead, I just have a steady confidence that if the worst were to occur I have done everything I can to be prepared (including the kind of training you have received and regular practice and tactical training). So - bottom line, I think the negative aspects of what you describe will pass, and welcome to the carrying world. Glad to have you aboard.

  8. #7
    Agree on all the above. I've been thinking a lot about the "paranoid" issue lately as I've been contemplating having to OC in other states where I'm either unlicensed or OC is prohibited.

    I'm a former So. Calif. dweller (including gang areas of Anaheim, Santa Ana, and surrounding areas) and have been "paranoid" in the sense of making every effort to be continuously situationally aware, working out escape routes, looking for potential weapons I could use, mentally processing scenarios, etc. I don't consider this paranoid but I think many people do as they don't think they'll encounter life-threatening situations. So many people walk around (with or without children -- I have 6) with a high degree of inattention and although it's they're right, I consider it irresponsible.

    After realizing that caring about my well-being or that of my loved ones is not a bad thing, the next thing, as TQuilici alluded to, is getting over the remorse or guilty feeling of doing something many others don't do: carry a gun.

    So what I've discovered about myself is I'm not feeling guilty about wearing my gun, I'm feeling irritated that I'm supposed to feel guilty about it due to the pressure of those that don't. I've never had to explain it to any stranger yet and I don't want to. I want to be LEFT ALONE. Whether I OC or CC (if someone should notice), don't confront me about it and get on my case; read the law and shut up! If you want to talk hardware and stuff like that, no problem.

    I would LOVE to OC in certain circumstances, but since I've not worked through how I would handle a naysayer, I don't (and there's also some legal issues I just learned about in a class specific to my state). If I would've known about OC/unloaded in Calif. when I was still there, I would've done it when I was working all-nighters by myself.

    Carry always, whenever legal, and it'll become as natural as walking, eating, peeing, whatever. I feel naked w/o my gun!

  9. I am in a very similar circumstance myself. I began CCing about 3 months ago at the age of 46. Having grown up years ago in the northeast (where I definitely needed to CC a bit more than my present midwest location) I understand some of the remarks about conflicted feelings about guns in general, however, having served 19 plus years in the military they don't have the stigma in my mind that a lot of my Massachusetts friends and family have firmly planted in theirs. At first I felt a little awkward adjusting to conceal carry but I quickly grew more and more comfortable. In my own personal efforts over the last couple of months I had to battle to become comfortable with carrying in condition one but I have overcome that issue pretty well. I am a bit jealous and motivated by your ironclad commitment to training, I strive to train more myself and become more familiar with my Springfield XD9sc. I celebrated my 47th bday recently and I am going to continue on with the CC lifestyle come what may. My life is very quiet and sometimes quite mundane but when trouble comes it doesn't make an announcement! Carry always, never tell!

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Highland NY
    Posts
    99
    Thanks everyone for your replies and encouragement. My comments are not out of fear or insecurity. Just what I assume to be some normal feelings for someone who has lived many years before they started going everywhere with a gun on their hip. It is good to know that I am not alone in my feelings and others have had or have the same experience. I carry a Gen4 G26 in a horsehide CBSTD. Found my sweet spot and it feels great. I think it is good to have a certain amount of a respectful fear for a firearm similar to that I have of the law so one can always remember what you are capable of doing and never become lax. Guess it is somewhat expected with my situation to have growing pains until the newness wears off.

  11. #10
    Do not remember as it has been over 40 years ago, and if you count open carry, well that goes back into 1960's. I guess with my military back ground in just came natural to me. But as mentioned above you have done all the right training, now get out there and shoot. Do not know much about NY other than the mayor of NYC is an idiot, but you mentioned monthly. Is this some type of NY reg that you can shoot only once a month? If not and can afford it and find the time go as much as you can to the range, get involved with other shooters and trade secrets as to what works best and the corrections you can make. Oh yeah one last thing Get Out Of N.Y. Just kidding Have fun and keep your bullets going down range.
    The Second Amendment is not about Hunting!!
    When the Government is afraid of of it's People, This LIBERTY
    When the People are afraid of the government, That is TYRANNY

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