multiple states
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Thread: multiple states

  1. multiple states

    Is it possible to get accepted by one state for a CHL and then turned down by another?

    If the state that turned you down is your home state, what are you supposed to do?

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  3. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by jtharveyjr View Post
    Is it possible to get accepted by one state for a CHL and then turned down by another?
    Yeah, it is. Particularly if the state that turned you down in a "may-issue" state like AL, CA, CT, DE, HI, MA, MD, NJ, NY, or RI. And the state that issued you a permit is any other state except IL.

    Quote Originally Posted by jtharveyjr View Post
    If the state that turned you down is your home state, what are you supposed to do?
    If your home state is AL or DE, you may be able to get a permit from another state that your home state will honor. In all of the other "may-issue" states, the state only honors their own permits. Bummer isn't it?

  4. Quote Originally Posted by jtharveyjr View Post
    If the state that turned you down is your home state, what are you supposed to do?
    If your home state is AL or DE, you may be able to get a permit from another state that your home state will honor. In all of the other "may-issue" states, the state only honors their own permits. Bummer isn't it?
    I have a UT permit and though TX hasn't officially turned me down, it has been six months and we are now into the second round of clarifications. (misdemeanor stuff that happened 35-years ago)

    Yes, I am an old guy.

  5. #4
    So then you are from TX?

    IIRC, mindemeanors don't disqualify you in that state unless it is domestic violence or drug related. Perhaps someone from that state could chime in. I do also seem to remember that Texas will not issue you a CCW if you are behind on your child support payments. (An odd restriction I might add.)

  6. Covered

    If your covered with your UT permit why even worry you can get a AZ permit if you just want another permit its recognized in TX also but each state has its little qwerks on how to eliminate or hold people up on receiving permits or there just busy AZ gets it done on two weeks with 4 people on the office if you cant get what you want keep what you have

  7. In the end it may be up to the individual county sheriff in a state which you apply...yes there are "state" guidelines that they are suppose to follow, But we all know how that goes....and for "out of state" applicants the appeal process might prove itself to be unworkable.
    I live in a "shall issue" state but it is still up to the individual sheriff in the county that you live that has final say...and they have the excuse that if they have a "bad feeling" that you may be a danger to yourself or others...can you say B as in bull S as in *****...
    so effectively it just means that the sheriff must tell you why he is turning you down....then it opens up a way more effective appeals process....it's better than "may issue" which it is completely their sole discretion and they answer to no one.

  8. So if you have ever been convicted of a non-violent felony you are excluded for life from ever obtaining a concealed around permit or even owning a firearm for that matter?

    Thanks

  9. #8
    If you are convicted of a felony or Domestic Violence (whether misdemeanor or felony), you are excluded from possessing/owning/carrying/touching a gun for life unless either the law is changed or if you get your civil rights restored from the governor (and it specifically includes gun rights). Otherwise, don't be touching a gun.

  10. Though immediately paid, the charge was for failure to pay support. Do governors actually do that and is it the governor from the state in which the conviction occurred or in the current state of residence.

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by jtharveyjr View Post
    Though immediately paid, the charge was for failure to pay support. Do governors actually do that and is it the governor from the state in which the conviction occurred or in the current state of residence.
    That is a felony conviction? That doesn't sound right. I don't know if governors actually do that (though I am guessing if you are in CA,MD, and NY you might be out of luck). I believe the governor in the state where you were convicted is the person you need to contact, but I am not completely sure. You should contact a lawyer in your area.

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