New to CCW
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Thread: New to CCW

  1. New to CCW

    Hello all from New Jersey. I am new to CCW and to handguns for that matter. I'll get right to it as I said I am a newbie and need help in the personal things I can do to help my accuracy. I bought a Glock 19 and am having problems and I mean problems I am all over the place. I am on the paper but low, high, left and right. Where do I start and what could I do on my own to get close. I want to do training but want to get my feet wet and somewhat efficient before I go and make a fool of myself. All help welcome and thank you in advance. I am glad to be a part of this forum and look forward in talking with you all. I have a lot to learn holsters, carry position, different tactics but, first things first and thatís being accurate.
    But He was wounded for our transgressions, He was bruised for our iniquities; The chastisement for our peace was upon Him,And by His stripes we are healed.
    Isaiah 53:4-5

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  3. #2
    Not trying to be a SA.... Pay for lessons. Slow down. I'm going to bet you are shooting too fast. Two hands. Believe it or not, there are some very good u-tube videos on the subject. As you practice more you will notice that you are consistently in an area on the target. Once you get to that point you will figure out that it is in your grip or trigger finger. (There is a chart somewhere that I can't find right now.) It will help tell you were you are struggling.

    Welcome to the forum.
    GunBroker.com Message Forums - Handgun Accuracy Problems(shooting error chart)

    Gun Sight Accuracy Chart

    Psalm 82:3-5

  4. #3
    Check out this post (on USAcarry) by Daryl Dempsey. It's pretty good and may help some.

    Twuble Shooting?

    But definitely get some training. Professional is probably your best bet eventually (Gunsite, Front Sight, Thunder Ranch). Of course an NRA course would be great to start out with. Even going with a buddy who shoots will be helpful, as he/she will be able to provide some basic pointers. Good luck.

  5. #4
    I'm gonna saddle up with 'Iam2Taz' on his response - :). Sometimes you cant self correct your shooting problems and no amount of ammo or range time will help. The more frustrated you get, the more problems you create. If you can afford to pay for instruction, see if you cant find an experienced shooter to watch you and give some pointers. one sure fire way to eliminate flinching or problems with anticipating the round going off is to get a wheel gun and two to three rounds to the cylinder, give it a spin with your eyes closed, close the cylinder, sigh the gun/target and fire the gun double action. With the target linked by 'Iam2Tz' that will really tell you if your anticipating the shot. Do this several times and train yourself to relax while pulling the trigger and not worry about the round going off.

  6. #5
    As others have said, having an experienced shooter with you (paid or volunteer) will help. But practice on your own is good as well, as long as you don't just repeat the same drills expecting to "get better." Analyze each shot, and treat it like its the only one that counts. You probably already know what sight alignment and sight picture should be for your pistol, but if you don't, start there. You have to know what the perfect setup looks like first, then work on keeping it steady while you press the trigger rearward.

    I can't speak highly enough of dry practice. That's "firing" an empty gun. Check your owners manual to make sure it won't damage the guts. Most modern models are fine to dry practice with. Otherwise, use snap caps. Get them at Cabelas, Bass Pro, and gun shops everywhere.

    Dry practice is cheap, fun, and convenient. You can do it in your living room! Just make sure you remove all live ammo from the room (im not kidding), double and triple check your chamber, cylinder, mag well, etc, to ensure they are empty (im still not kidding), and then pick a certain spot to aim at that will be least likely to allow a bullet to harm anyone. Just to be safe. Still totally not kidding.

    While you're dry practicing, watch the sight picture and try to keep it from moving as you press the trigger through the breaking point. Watch the front sight. If it moves at the break, that's the direction your round would likely have gone if you'd been firing live rounds. Keep practicing until you can keep it steady all the way through.

    When you live fire, remember your dry practice drills. Start at 5 or 7 yards if you can. Concentrate on each individual shot, and let the shot actually surprise you a little. If you start to scatter your shots again, unload your gun, right there at the range, and dry practice 5 or 10 times. Then reload and shoot live again. You'll be amazed. Good luck, and be safe!

  7. #6
    Any chance you ride motorcycles (or have in the past??) Just wondering??
    Watch videos, read articles, get a lesson or two from an NRA trainer..

    Gulf Coast, Floriduh
    Sccy is the limit

  8. #7
    HOLD IT!!! I'm still trying to get over the first sentence where you state you are in New Jersey and have a CCW????????

  9. Move the targets in to about 12 FEET. Folks argue about shooting this close but there's reason to the madness. The farther away the target is, the more mistakes are amplified. What may move bullet impact 1 inch at 12 feet could put it off the paper at 25 yards. If you don't know what you are doing wrong, you can't fix it. It also builds confidence in the new shooter because they can SEE the results of very shot. Completely missing the target confuses and frustrates because you don't know what you did wrong.

    Shoot slow, deliberate groups concentrating on proper form (stance, foot placement,...), grip and trigger press. Focus on doing EVERYTHING the exact same way every time you shoot a round. Make sure you are HITTING the target the same place consistently. When you consistently keep every round in a group the size of the bottom of a Coke can, move the target back 3 feet and repeat the process. Keep moving the targets back when you're groups reach a certain size. If they start to grow, move it back closer. When you get out to about 20 yards, start the process over shooting one handed. when you get one hand shooting down, start over working with your off hand. By the time you are done, you'll be able to hit what you are aiming at with either hand and that's a very good skill to have in a self defense situation.

    Once you have learned to shoot straight and you have the basics down (master grip, trigger press, ...) THEN you can work on getting self defense related stuff like drawing and firing and multi-shot rapid fire. If you are snatching, milking or otherwise screwing up your trigger pull, you aren't going to hit where you need to in a self defense situation. Also, if you don't get the same master grip every time you draw the gun, you won't hit the same place and your sights won't be aligned the same way when you point the gun. Get the gun sitting in your hand exactly how you need it to for the sights to be aligned. Hold that grip and holster. Once holstered, slowly undo each finger 1 by one and pay attention to how they feel when they are on the gun. I look for certain tactile points like how the middle joint of my middle finger feels when it is placed properly, how my wrist is angled, where my thumb falls on the gun, ... to learn how to get the right grip on the gun in the holster. Then practice drawing with your eyes closed. Draw, present the gun at eye or chin level and sights should be roughly aligned and fully visible when you open your eyes.

    They are called 'fundamentals' for a reason. Getting the basics right makes it easier to learn the more complicated stuff like rapid fire and instinctive or point shooting. Poor trigger control or a misaligned, inconsistent grip on the gun will change the point of impact and if you don't hit what you need to, you are not only just making noise and wasting powder and shot but you are also sending real bullets down range that have to go someplace. I'd practice the draw by drawing and shooting 1 shot onto the target and holstering. When your first shot hits where you want it to EVERY time, go to shooting 2 rounds and reholstering. Once you can get multiple rounds on target quickly, go to multiple targets and progress the same way (draw, 1 shot on 1 target, 1 shot on the next target, holster). Focus on the FRONT SIGHT during rapid fire strings. Align the sights for the first shot and pull the trigger again when the front sight falls back onto where you want the bullet to go. The same holds true for multiple target strings. Your eyes move to the next target, then the gun. When the front sight hit the middle of the target (where you should be focusing your eyes), mash the trigger. Hold your aiming point a little low of dead center. Most folks miss high on multiple target strings, so aim a few inches or a hand's breadth low of dead center.

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Providence Ranch View Post
    I can't speak highly enough of dry practice. That's "firing" an empty gun. Check your owners manual to make sure it won't damage the guts. Most modern models are fine to dry practice with. Otherwise, use snap caps. Get them at Cabelas, Bass Pro, and gun shops everywhere.

    Dry practice is cheap, fun, and convenient. You can do it in your living room! Just make sure you remove all live ammo from the room (im not kidding), double and triple check your chamber, cylinder, mag well, etc, to ensure they are empty (im still not kidding), and then pick a certain spot to aim at that will be least likely to allow a bullet to harm anyone. Just to be safe. Still totally not kidding.

    While you're dry practicing, watch the sight picture and try to keep it from moving as you press the trigger through the breaking point. Watch the front sight. If it moves at the break, that's the direction your round would likely have gone if you'd been firing live rounds. Keep practicing until you can keep it steady all the way through.
    Ditto. You might also want to practice the fundamentals of marksmanship with an airpistol. No recoil, and cheap ammo.

  11. Quote Originally Posted by pmb61 View Post
    HOLD IT!!! I'm still trying to get over the first sentence where you state you are in New Jersey and have a CCW????????
    In the process of getting a Florida non res. and yes its absolutly impossible to get one here in New Jersey.
    But He was wounded for our transgressions, He was bruised for our iniquities; The chastisement for our peace was upon Him,And by His stripes we are healed.
    Isaiah 53:4-5

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