Can a person with a Kansas ccl marry a convicted felon?
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Thread: Can a person with a Kansas ccl marry a convicted felon?

  1. Can a person with a Kansas ccl marry a convicted felon?

    I was having a conversation with my girlfriend this morning and she asked if I could legally marry a convicted felon and keep my ccl? I did a search but found nothing. Would like some information on this if anybody has the facts. Thanks

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  3. I dont know about the Kansas CCL, I don't see how they can punish you and take something from you for what someone else did. But on the other hand if you keep a gun in the house technically he/she (not sure who is marrying who) would be a felon in possession. So even though I think you could keep your permit it would be kinda useless because you could not keep a weapon without taking the risk or sending your new significant other away for a very long time.

  4. #3
    I would think that if one gets married to a convicted felon and they live together then there can not be any guns in the house. Because if there are guns in the house, then the felon would be in possession of a gun and would therefore be breaking the law.

    Now there could be some loop holes around this but I'm not sure. I would have them call there local LEO and ask. Every state is different about this. You can also look up your states gun laws and find out what it says about restricted persons and see what it defines possession as.

  5. #4
    I'm guessing that your best resource in this matter would be your local sheriffs office. It seems to me that if you restricted her access to your weapon, whether it be locking it away or on your person, it would not be any different than having children in the house. Just a guess.

  6. #5
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    Yes you can. The only thing the gun owner has to do is make sure the felon doesn't have access to functioning firearms while they (the permit holder) is not around. In other words if you leave the house and the felon is there, the guns have to be locked up. Somebody else's criminal record does not negate your rights.

    I'll sum it up by quoting (more or less) G. Gordon Liddy: "Being a convicted felon, I'm not allowed to own guns. Needless to say my wife has a very large collection".
    (Insert random tough-guy quote here)
    "See my gun?? Aren't you impressed?" - Anonymous sheepdog
    The hardware is the same, but the software is vastly different.

  7. #6

    Smile Concealed Carry married to a Felon

    I would not ask a leo. They do not seem to be that versed on the law do the lack of retraining as laws change.

    I would contact a lawyer that specializes in 2nd amendment.
    Rich
    Beware of your surroundings

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Sager View Post
    I'm guessing that your best resource in this matter would be your local sheriffs office. It seems to me that if you restricted her access to your weapon, whether it be locking it away or on your person, it would not be any different than having children in the house. Just a guess.

    Never, ever , under any circumstance do you ask a cop for legal advice. If the answer is that important to you pay the consult fee and ask a lawyer
    See, it's mumbo jumbo like that and skinny little lizards like you thinking they the last dragon that gives Kung Fu a bad name.
    http://www.gunrightsmedia.com/ Internet forum dedicated to second amendment

  9. Quote Originally Posted by G274me View Post
    Now there could be some loop holes around this but I'm not sure. I would have them call there local LEO and ask. Every state is different about this. You can also look up your states gun laws and find out what it says about restricted persons and see what it defines possession as.
    This is a federal law and you would have to comply with both State and federal law. Since they are infact prohibited persons by federal law State law really doesn't matter because they would be in violation of federal law by default.

    This sounded like a hypothetical question but if it is not or becomes reality later just like any legal matter I would suggest contacting a lawyer to make sure. But I am almost 100 percent sure that the felon would be in violation of the law if the gun is in the house no matter which state you live in.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Armed_and_Safe View Post
    This is a federal law and you would have to comply with both State and federal law. Since they are infact prohibited persons by federal law State law really doesn't matter because they would be in violation of federal law by default.

    This sounded like a hypothetical question but if it is not or becomes reality later just like any legal matter I would suggest contacting a lawyer to make sure. But I am almost 100 percent sure that the felon would be in violation of the law if the gun is in the house no matter which state you live in.
    The felon would not be in violation as long as the gun owner were present or the guns were locked up one way or another. Either would be OK. This was a federal ruling from a long time ago.
    (Insert random tough-guy quote here)
    "See my gun?? Aren't you impressed?" - Anonymous sheepdog
    The hardware is the same, but the software is vastly different.

  11. Quote Originally Posted by B2Tall View Post
    The felon would not be in violation as long as the gun owner were present or the guns were locked up one way or another. Either would be OK. This was a federal ruling from a long time ago.
    Could you cite the case please? I am not questioning your word just curious to see it.

    I think I saw a case before that said the opposite. Even if the owner was there unless it was on there person the felon still had access to it. And locking it up, if it was a key lock unless the key is locked some how then the felon is in possession of the key (can keep going in circles here) and if a combination lock there is no way the felon can prove he didn't know the combination. The last part really bugged me because the felon wouldn't have to prove anything the burden of prof lies with the prosecution.

    I tried looking for the case I was reading before but could not find it, if you could point me to one that says otherwise please do so. Like I said that combination part really got to me and I couldn't believe it when I read it.

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