Can I legally have a (really just one) drink with dinner in MS? - Page 3
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Thread: Can I legally have a (really just one) drink with dinner in MS?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Pasco, Washington, United States
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keykutter:247926
    Another bad an analogy. It's illegal to drink and drive. Having keys in a restaurant is not driving.

    If you're really saying you are not affected by alcohol, I just have nothing more I can say. I have thought you have been off the wall in some other post's you have made but this one takes the cake.

    I'm kinda really wondering at this point what kind of job you have as a Naval Officer that allows you that type of thinking. Amazing!

    Kk

    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    Heck, 29 people died every day in 2009 due to drunk driving accidents. Why is it not illegal to possess car keys in a bar or in a restaurant that serves alcohol? How come people don't leave in fear of their lives when they see someone having a beer with dinner that they know has keys in their pocket?

    Yet it is soooo dangerous to drink a beer with a gun in a holster that we must pass laws to prohibit the mere possession of a gun in a restaurant that serves alcohol or a bar, and people will leave the building if they see someone having a beer while wearing a gun?

    Just a question here: how many of you that would never drink and carry a gun have no problem drinking a beer with car keys in your pocket? Can you really be trusted not to drink and drive and kill someone, or do you honestly think you can handle your alcohol enough not to take the keys out of your pocket and drive?
    1. Argumentum ad hominem. Don't give up on your argument and attack the poster, stick with your argument if you truly feel you are in the right.

    2. I think you missed his analogy. His analogy was carrying a holstered firearm (not shooting) and carrying car keys in a pocket (not driving).

    Then he asked a question. Here is a more specific but related question, those that had a glass of wine with their lasagna, or a single beer with their burger, do they feel they can drive home after dinner?

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  3. #22
    Back when I was working he ambulance he policy was that if you had one swallow of beer or one sip of wine you could not respond to a call. Would the smallest of us be incapacitated after one drink? No. The policy was not there to protect the patient, the policy was there to protect the department and the medic from law suits. Do you really want to be in a court room with some attorney turning that one beer into you being an angry drunk with a gun. Is it right that there are laws about guns and drinking? You are going to have to talk a long time before you get me to agree with any infringement of our rights. However, there are laws on the books and if we get caught breaking them there are consequences one of which might be the loss of the right to carry. Additionally there is no constitutional protection preventing someone from suing you. Any alcohol in your system increases their chance of prevailing. My personal policy no alcohol away from home unless the gun is at home. Is this inconvenient? Sometimes. Is it a problem? Not really.

    I went out to a restaurant not too long ago that served alcohol. It is legal for me to carry in such a place as long as I do not drink. I was the only one at the table not drinking. I was also the driver so everything worked out well. If I go over to a friends house and I want to drink that is perfectly legal but I still leave the gun home.
    NRA,
    Armed Citizens Legal Defense Fund
    http://armedcitizensnetwork.org/

  4. Quote Originally Posted by Keykutter View Post
    Another bad an analogy. It's illegal to drink and drive. Having keys in a restaurant is not driving.
    My point exactly. Let's make it illegal to discharge a firearm while under the influence with a self defense exception just like it is illegal to driver a car while under the influence. Criminalize behavior, not objects.

    Quote Originally Posted by Keykutter View Post
    If you're really saying you are not affected by alcohol, I just have nothing more I can say. I have thought you have been off the wall in some other post's you have made but this one takes the cake.
    You show me one post of mine where I ever stated I was not affected by alcohol. What I am saying is that a couple of beers with dinner (or a lot, for that matter) is not going to create an irresistible urge in me to remove my gun from the holster and play with it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Keykutter View Post
    I'm kinda really wondering at this point what kind of job you have as a Naval Officer that allows you that type of thinking. Amazing!
    You mean the kind of thinking that says let's not punish everyone for the actions of a small group of people? The kind of thinking that says the 2nd Amendment applies just as much in a restaurant or in a bar as inside a person's home? The kind of thinking that says it should the private properties owner's rights if they choose to allow firearms in their establishment rather than the government's?

    You never did answer my question Keykutter: Do YOU feel as if you are safe having one or two beers with dinner with car keys in your pocket and a vehicle in the parking lot? 29 people died every day in 2009 due to drunk driving crashes. Can we really trust that you won't go out and get in your car and drive because of your lack of self control after one or two beers at dinner? Or should we pass a law that you cannot enter a restaurant that serves alcohol with keys in your possession?
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

  5. #24
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    Jul 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by xdmgator:247910
    I don't know what the big deal is ??? Back in the old west days everyone was carrying in the saloons :)
    I believe A lot of saloons.. Not most, but a lot of them would have people check their guns. Even then people had enough sense not to mix guns and alcohol. Remeber, saloon shootings were usually ambushes because they knew the person drinking was unarmed. But I could be wrong. A lot of The "history" of the west is sketchy at best.

  6. Thankyou for telling him that. because i would'nt allow my wife and children i if i was aware of someone drinking and carrying if you cant drink and drive, well you sure as hell cant drink and carry a loaded wepon. dont matter to me if he only has one. i drink but i dont carry at the same time!

  7. #26
    Just for the record my "saloon' comment was sarcasm :) times are a little different LOL....you know they say alcoholic makes you smarter, stronger...there's a reason the say the comment " he grew beer muscles" why would it be any different under the influence and carrying a firearm ....bottom line is never ever ever ever drink and carry period if you can't handle that decision you shouldn't carry ! As said earlier nothing good can come from drinking (1 beer) or more and carrying...even if the scenario of above played out ....have one beer then the self defense situation occurs and you need to use your firearm ....just always remember this its always up to YOU to proove that deadly force was necessary, try doing that when witnesses saw you drinking or you show any % of alcohol in your system

  8. In MN it's .02 . In other words, one weak one and your fine. Anymore, go lock it up in the safe.

  9. #28
    Yes, this has been beaten to death in a previous thread. Bottom line is, IMO, you MAY be legal to drink responsibly while you carry, depending on the laws in your particular state/county. But why chance the possibility that you will have any amount of alcohol in your system when you end up in a shoot situation? It WILL be argued that your judgment was impaired, and possibly that you were acting irresponsibly, if it ever comes to light that you had alcohol in your system. Same with driving. If you accidentally plow into a schoolbus, and you had a beer or two, you're SO going to be the bad guy. My choice is simple. If I'm carrying or if ill be driving, I abstain.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Providence Ranch View Post
    Yes, this has been beaten to death in a previous thread. Bottom line is, IMO, you MAY be legal to drink responsibly while you carry, depending on the laws in your particular state/county. But why chance the possibility that you will have any amount of alcohol in your system when you end up in a shoot situation? It WILL be argued that your judgment was impaired, and possibly that you were acting irresponsibly, if it ever comes to light that you had alcohol in your system. Same with driving. If you accidentally plow into a schoolbus, and you had a beer or two, you're SO going to be the bad guy. My choice is simple. If I'm carrying or if ill be driving, I abstain.
    It's not that I disagree but i do wonder how often they do a BAT as part of an investigation of a shooting the wasn't obviously alcohol related. IOW if I had a beer w/ dinner 2 hours ago and then I shoot a mugger why would they do a BAT on me, unless I volunteer that I had one?
    See, it's mumbo jumbo like that and skinny little lizards like you thinking they the last dragon that gives Kung Fu a bad name.
    http://www.gunrightsmedia.com/ Internet forum dedicated to second amendment

  11. Quote Originally Posted by Treo View Post
    It's not that I disagree but i do wonder how often they do a BAT as part of an investigation of a shooting the wasn't obviously alcohol related. IOW if I had a beer w/ dinner 2 hours ago and then I shoot a mugger why would they do a BAT on me, unless I volunteer that I had one?
    It would be more likely if you shot the mugger in the parking lot of the restaurant while going to your car after dinner.

    For me, I just refuse to center my life around self-defense and my gun. I tend to avoid places where there would be a high probability of having to use my gun in self-defense. Since I do that anyway, I don't feel the need to leave my gun behind if I am going to have a beer or two with dinner, or a night out of entertainment such as watching my daughter sing Karaoke because I would not choose to be there if I felt there was a high probability of trouble anyway. That being said, I know that the probability of having to defend oneself is never zero - and I am not willing to lower my defensive capability considerably by leaving my gun behind when not required to. It's all about balance in the cirumstances and location.

    I've sat down with the owner of the establishment we go to every week where my daughter likes to sing. We've talked guns and his Army days and my Navy career. He's perfectly fine servind me beer with my gun on my belt. I think if anyone complained, he would simply explain to them that he respected and appreciated people's right to self protection and they were certainly free to stay or leave.

    I find it odd that it seems like more people would consider a man having a couple beers during a night out with his family to be more dangerous because he has a gun in a holster than a couple guys who enter a Dennys restaurant wearing masks on their heads and brandishing firearms.
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

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