Layover in state in which I do not have a conceal carry permit- is that even an issue
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Thread: Layover in state in which I do not have a conceal carry permit- is that even an issue

  1. Layover in state in which I do not have a conceal carry permit- is that even an issue

    Treavel Cin-Dener-Phoenix. I have Cin and Florida permit. I can carry in Az, but not in Colorado. Does this effect the transport of a handgun while I await the next flight? I have printed and read all TSA and the airlines guidelines but nothing is mentioned. My thinking if the weapon is secure there and I don't have access to it it does not matter. Is this correct? Lastly, I have heard of travelers locking their cases securely to there check-in luggage. Would it not be so obvious and better to have it checked then place in suitcase? Seems if it gets a special tag it would be obvious. TSA allows small box of ammo in the same case if in original container. Any suggestions would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.

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  3. #2
    Unloaded pistol goes inside a hard sided gun case. Most airlines allow ammunition to be in the same pistol case as the gun but some do not. I transport the gun with the slide locked back and empty magazines out of the gun so it is easy to show up on x-ray as unloaded and a 20 round box of ammo in the corner of the gun case. The pistol case gets locked with locks that only you have the key or combination to, and those locks will only be opened by you (Federal regulation requirement). The pistol case goes inside your suitcase which will then be checked in at baggage. Your suitcase can be locked with a TSA lock if you desire, if you put a non TSA lock on your suitcase, TSA will be more than happy to test their bolt cutters on it.

    You will go to the manned baggage check-in counter and tell the clerk that you have an unloaded firearm in your luggage to declare. They will give you a tag to sign. They might ask you to show them the unloaded gun, but probably not. You sign the tag, and it goes inside your suitcase somewhere near the gun case. Your suitcase, which looks just like every other suitcase goes to TSA where they run it through x-ray, they see an unloaded gun in a gun case with locks on it and see a tag - all inside your suitcase via xray. You check your luggage all the way to your final destination and at your final destination your suitcase pops out on the carousel with all the other luggage.

    The only problem you will have with possession during a layover is if you take possession of your luggage in a state that does not allow you to legally possess that firearm, especially if you are flying out of that state the next day because once you claim and take possession your luggage, you have to declare the gun again at baggage check-in. In a situation like that, ask the airline to forward your luggage for you so you never take possession of it and live out of a carry on for one night. Colorado allows possession of handguns and their magazine capacity laws are not much to worry about.

    The reason you want the gun case inside a regular suitcase is so the suitcase it is in looks like every other suitcase and there is nothing to indicate there is a firearm inside. Some people lock the gun case to the inside of the suitcase to make it more difficult to get into the suitcase and walk off with the gun case.
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

  4. Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    You will go to the manned baggage check-in counter and tell the clerk that you have an unloaded firearm in your luggage to declare. They will give you a tag to sign. They might ask you to show them the unloaded gun, but probably not.

    The only problem you will have with possession during a layover is if you take possession of your luggage in a state that does not allow you to legally possess that firearm, especially if you are flying out of that state the next day because once you claim and take possession your luggage, you have to declare the gun again at baggage check-in. In a situation like that, ask the airline to forward your luggage for you so you never take possession of it and live out of a carry on for one night.
    Well said LCDR, if I might add, first- ask the TSA agent if they will take a look at the empty chamber to verify that it is empty. There is a disturbing trend with TSA to "...take your word on this fact" followed by another trend of firearms discharging at various stages of transport. Second, if you are delayed by weather, forwarding luggage may not be an option, so consider possible states of diversion, and check their laws- particularly mags & capacity. In some states, even though the firearm is secured and you are supposed to be protected under the McClure-Volkmer Act, there are states that won't let this law get in the way of their agendas.

    Good luck, and safe traveling.

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by desertrat12 View Post
    Well said LCDR, if I might add, first- ask the TSA agent if they will take a look at the empty chamber to verify that it is empty.
    I can't agree with that. I won't invite an agent of the government to needlessly handle my firearm nor advise anyone else to. Just my personal opinion. There is no requirement in regulations for anyone other than the passenger to verify the gun is unloaded, but the regulations do allow the airline and TSA to verify the gun is unloaded if they desire to. A suitable alternative to your suggestion would be to suggest using a chamber flag. Once the gun is locked in the case - if the passenger insists that the government and airlines follows the Federal regulations, the passenger will always be present to unlock the gun case themselves if it is inspected for any reason. The best situation occurs when the gun case is locked before it is delivered to the airline and never gets unlocked until the passenger has it at their destination.
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

  6. #5
    I recall a case from a couple of years ago like this. A man with a CCL was traveling with his gun in his checked luggage. He landed in NY and had to spend the night so he had to recheck his bag the next day. When he declared that he had a gun in his luggage it was game over. Arrested for illegal possession of a firearm in NY. So it is imperative that you plan your trip extremely well ahead of time so that something like this doesn't happen, even if you've planned for it not to happen. The previous suggestion of checking your luggage all the way through to your destination seems very prudent in case you do have to have an unplanned layover where your gun is not welcome and you'll be in big trouble.
    Kill them all and let God sort them out!

  7. Excellent information. Very informative- I appreciate your expertise NavyLCDR, and everyone in the forum.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    I can't agree with that. I won't invite an agent of the government to needlessly handle my firearm nor advise anyone else to. ...A suitable alternative to your suggestion would be to suggest using a chamber flag. ...if the passenger insists that the government and airlines follows the Federal regulations, the passenger will always be present to unlock the gun case themselves if it is inspected for any reason. Emphasis added The best situation occurs when the gun case is locked before it is delivered to the airline and never gets unlocked until the passenger has it at their destination.
    When I said to ask the TSA agent to verify a clear chamber, I do not hand the firearm to the Agent, the firearm is presented in such a manner that they can see the clear chamber- the only prints I want on that arm are mine so if anything does happen there will be a 'clean slate' for prints. Additionally, this all serves as secondary check that the lock actually is.

    I like the chamber flag idea- have you run into any problems with this?

    '...passenger insists that the government and airlines follows the Federal regulations...' as a disabled traveler, My experiences are that the ACAA, CFR & USC seem to be more 'guidelines' than law. I had a suit case with a declared firearm searched by TSA after it entered into the dispatching sequence, but the pistol lock was undisturbed, nor had it been shimmed, as the contents were in the specific areas and directions that they left in at check in.

    The next time I travel with a sidearm I'll try your ideas, I know my wife will appreciate it. You may get a Thank You email from her! LOL!

  9. #8
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by desertrat12 View Post
    When I said to ask the TSA agent to verify a clear chamber, I do not hand the firearm to the Agent, the firearm is presented in such a manner that they can see the clear chamber-
    I don't understand where you the weapon and the TSA agent are in the same place at the same time

    If you're that freaked stick a radio opaque chamber flag (so it shows up on xray) in the gun and call it good
    See, it's mumbo jumbo like that and skinny little lizards like you thinking they the last dragon that gives Kung Fu a bad name.
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  10. #9
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    The gun will be in your checked luggage. You will not carry on under any civilian circumstance. Since the gun is in the checked luggage and was accepted by the carrier at your point of departure, there should be no problems.

    I've done the same as you are. My layover was a couple of hours in Chicago en-rout from Florida to PA. Didn't have any issue.

    Now if you have to take possession of your checked baggage, that's a whole different story. Then the transport/ownership regulations of that particular state kick in. Here is a link to a quick reference for Colorado.
    http://www.handgunlaw.us/states/colorado.pdf
    To not stand against injustice is to stand for it.
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    My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.

  11. #10
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    All this chatter about letting or not letting the TSA or any other authority do an empty chamber check, strikes me.

    Do you guys actually put your gun on checked baggage without a barrel cable lock on the gun? Maybe I'm paranoid (or it could be that I've had stuff stolen out of my checked luggage already) but when that gun is out of my personal possession, I want it as secured as possible. When mine goes into the lock box, in my checked bag, it already has a trigger lock and a barrel cable lock on it.
    To not stand against injustice is to stand for it.
    Don't confuse my personality and my attitude.
    My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.

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