New to CC. Question about going state to state. - Page 2
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Thread: New to CC. Question about going state to state.

  1. #11
    Read the state laws very closely. There are a number of states that do not recognize any non-resident permits.

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  3. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    3,832
    A lot of good comments so far. Let me add my $0.02. Find out (usually an Internet search or one of the above links) who actually writes the reciprocities for the states you will be traveling to/through. Mostly, it's the Attorney General but some can be the State Police. When you find the copy of the reciprocity agreement between the states, print that out and keep it in a binder in your vehicle. This will keep the Barney Fife's of the world from harassing you because you have a UT permit, a NJ driver's license yet are traveling in PA legally under the UT permit.

    A few things to look at that are common hang ups between states:
    - restaurant/bar carry, are you allowed, are there restrictions
    - do you have a duty to inform a police officer when you have more than a mere encounter with them (pulled over, being questioned, etc.)
    - vehicle carry, how are you allowed
    - rounds allowed in a magazine
    - type of ammunition (I threw this one in since you are in NJ)

    Hope this helps you out.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  4. Quote Originally Posted by wolf_fire View Post
    A lot of good comments so far. Let me add my $0.02. Find out (usually an Internet search or one of the above links) who actually writes the reciprocities for the states you will be traveling to/through. Mostly, it's the Attorney General but some can be the State Police. When you find the copy of the reciprocity agreement between the states, print that out and keep it in a binder in your vehicle. This will keep the Barney Fife's of the world from harassing you because you have a UT permit, a NJ driver's license yet are traveling in PA legally under the UT permit.

    A few things to look at that are common hang ups between states:
    - restaurant/bar carry, are you allowed, are there restrictions
    - do you have a duty to inform a police officer when you have more than a mere encounter with them (pulled over, being questioned, etc.)
    - vehicle carry, how are you allowed
    - rounds allowed in a magazine
    - type of ammunition (I threw this one in since you are in NJ)

    Hope this helps you out.
    That $0.02 it's more than valuable. Thanks a lot. That's very good info.

  5. #14

    New to CC. Question about going state to state.

    For 99 cents download the iPhone apps named ccw. Is GREAT

  6. #15
    Pretty good advice from previous posts. Be aware that most internet sources, even the good ones, are not comprehensive in their depictions of various state laws. Best to look the laws up yourself. Also be aware of potential pitfalls with regards to Federal regulations, particularly the Federal gun free school zones act:
    .
    The Gun Free School Zones Act of 1990 (18 U.S.C. § 922(q)) states:
    (A) It shall be unlawful for any individual knowingly to possess a firearm that has moved in or that otherwise affects interstate or foreign commerce at a place that the individual knows, or has reasonable cause to believe, is a school zone.
    (B) Subparagraph (A) does not apply to the possession of a firearm—
    (i) on private property not part of school grounds;
    (ii) if the individual possessing the firearm is licensed to do so by the State in which the school zone is located or a political subdivision of the State, and the law of the State or political subdivision requires that, before an individual obtains such a license, the law enforcement authorities of the State or political subdivision verify that the individual is qualified under law to receive the license;
    (iii) that is— (I) not loaded; and (II) in a locked container, or a locked firearms rack that is on a motor vehicle;
    (iv) by an individual for use in a program approved by a school in the school zone;
    (v) by an individual in accordance with a contract entered into between a school in the school zone and the individual or an employer of the individual;
    (vi) by a law enforcement officer acting in his or her official capacity; or
    (vii) that is unloaded and is possessed by an individual while traversing school premises for the purpose of gaining access to public or private lands open to hunting, if the entry on school premises is authorized by school authorities.
    (3) (A) Except as provided in subparagraph (B), it shall be unlawful for any person, knowingly or with reckless disregard for the safety of another, to discharge or attempt to discharge a firearm that has moved in or that otherwise affects interstate or foreign commerce at a place that the person knows is a school zone. (B) Subparagraph (A) does not apply to the discharge of a firearm—
    (i) on private property not part of school grounds;
    (ii) as part of a program approved by a school in the school zone, by an individual who is participating in the program;
    (iii) by an individual in accordance with a contract entered into between a school in a school zone and the individual or an employer of the individual; or
    (iv) by a law enforcement officer acting in his or her official capacity.
    (4) Nothing in this subsection shall be construed as preempting or preventing a State or local government from enacting a statute establishing gun free school zones as provided in this subsection.
    Definitions[edit source | editbeta]
    Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. § 921(a)(25) the term "school zone" means—
    (A) in, or on the grounds of, a public, parochial or private school; or
    (B) within a distance of 1,000 feet from the grounds of a public, parochial or private school.
    Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. § 921(a)(26) the term "school" means a school which provides elementary or secondary education, as determined under State law.
    Penalty[edit source | editbeta]
    18 U.S.C. § 924(a)(4) establishes the penalty for violating GFSZA:
    Whoever violates the Act shall be fined not more than $5,000, imprisoned for not more than 5 years, or both. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the term of imprisonment imposed under this paragraph shall not run concurrently with any other term of imprisonment imposed under any other provision of law.
    Note: A conviction under the GFSZA will cause an individual to become a "prohibited person" under the Gun Control Act of 1968. This will bar them from legally owning firearms for the rest of their life.
    .
    What sub-paragraph B ii means is that the feds don't recognize out of state licenses with respect to the GFSZA, and the 1000' bubble around every school that goes with it, even if the state you're traveling in does recognize either your out of state resident or non-resident permit. I have not heard of anyone getting snagged by this, but forewarned is forearmed so to speak. I have spoken with a number of LEOs from various states who say they would not make an arrest over this as long as you had a valid permit recognized by their state, but you are counting on their benevolence...
    Last edited by JCliff; 09-07-2013 at 11:40 AM. Reason: emphasis, grammar

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