Safety or Not to Safety - Page 2
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Thread: Safety or Not to Safety

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by jcreek View Post
    When I carry a 1911 it's always cocked and locked. The instructors are right that you get used to turning it off. I carry my 1911s in a SERPA and when I draw, the safety comes off the same time I press the release button on the holster.
    And that sir is a great way to end up shooting yourself in the leg. Please look up Tex Grebner's YouTube video where you see him shooting himself in the leg using a 1911 where he bumped the safety to the off position while using a Serpa holster under the stress of close quarters training.

    If a person has a self-defense gun with an external safety I recommend always using the safety and never taking it off until the decision has been made to fire the gun.

    One other point. Please be sure that the safety can be manipulated easily without changing your grip. If you have to change your grip on the gun to take the safety off or on you are wasting time and you are not efficient.

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  3. #12
    I carry both a Glock and XDs which do not have a thumb safety. My wife carries a Taurus with a thumb safety and has practiced with it so that switching off the safety is now second nature, but she does keep the safety on while holstered.

  4. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cypher View Post
    Before we can really answer this we need to know what kind of gun you are carrying. I carry a decocked third gen S&W with the safety off but Id never do it with a cocked 1911
    I completely agree. I carry a Ruger SR9c - has both a trigger safety and a thumb safety. When I carry, I carry with one in the chamber, safety off. Most of the time, the thumb safety is there for a reason, however, I think Ruger went overkill adding both the trigger safety and thumb safety on a striker fire DAO pistol.

  5. #14
    I agree with trainers that say keep the safety on if that is the type of handgun you choose to carry. Too many accidents can happen when you least expect it. Get your body/mind trained when to release the safety at the proper time.

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Rocky River, Ohio
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    1,518
    Quote Originally Posted by Michaelc748 View Post
    So I've come across this is some instructional videos and in a recent CCP class. When they talk about different guns and they talk about ones that have manual thumb safeties, they say to make sure you train to accommodate that safety... that you will get used to it as you train. My concealed carry gun has a manual safety but I don't use it. I treat it like it is not there, just as a Glock for example, doesn't have a manual thumb safety. Is there something wrong with this or do these instructors just say this to cover there rear ends? Do all of you with thumb safeties use them?
    You don't say what kind of pistol it is.

    If it's something you carry with the hammer cocked, like an M1911 or a Browning Hi Power, I'd definitely use the safety.

    If on the other hand, it's something like a Beretta 92, or a S&W DA/SA type, I wouldn't use it. They're usually awkwardly positioned, and not necessary in the first place, given the double action and hammer block.

    Personally, I don't like conventional DA autos, either DA/SA or DAO. That leaves only Glocks, M1911s and Browning Hi Powers for me. The Glocks don't HAVE manual safeties. I always carry the M1911s and Brownings cocked and locked.

  7. I am known to carry a RUGER SR22. This gun has a manual thumb safety as well as a first pull double action trigger. I have thought recently about carrying with safety off (once holstered) seeing how the first trigger pull is quite stout. On the other hand I carry a Colt 1911A1 and I will carry that in the 3rd Condition, safety off. I have drilled to rack a round as I am drawing. In one fluid motion I am able to draw, rack, and acquire the target. I suppose after a certain amount of time I may switch to condition 1 carry; once my comfort level with this weapon increases. Whichever condition you choose to carry just practice, practice, practice, and it won't really matter in the end. You're talking milliseconds of difference when you've trained.

  8. I have a 1911 for my everyday.... always chambered and cocked...... thumb safety on.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by Cypher View Post
    Before we can really answer this we need to know what kind of gun you are carrying. I carry a decocked third gen S&W with the safety off but Id never do it with a cocked 1911
    THIS is the question that has to be answered, before we can give a correct answer the original question. Of course if it is in fact a 1911 style gun, you would most definitely engage the thumb safety upon loading the chamber. But with a double action-single action, like The older metal framed S&W, Sig's, Berettas etc. you would want to de-cock, then push the safety back up/off for carry, once the chamber is loaded.
    Retired Rangemaster, Glock Armorer, PPC competitor

  10. Quote Originally Posted by RJT CCW View Post
    And that sir is a great way to end up shooting yourself in the leg. Please look up Tex Grebner's YouTube video where you see him shooting himself in the leg using a 1911 where he bumped the safety to the off position while using a Serpa holster under the stress of close quarters training.

    If a person has a self-defense gun with an external safety I recommend always using the safety and never taking it off until the decision has been made to fire the gun.

    One other point. Please be sure that the safety can be manipulated easily without changing your grip. If you have to change your grip on the gun to take the safety off or on you are wasting time and you are not efficient.
    Michael, OP,

    There is even a THIRD choice that is VERY unpopular with a lot of the Glock folks: add a safety...

    I would have nothing but a Glock for EDC (21,gen4 - waiting on my 30s to show up & send off for added safety), but it must have a Caminolli thumb safety added. As various posters have stated, practice drawing and firing with your safety and it is muscle memory, second nature, and NOT a detriment, but only another safety to keep fatigue, complacency, mistakes, etc, from potentially causing a ND.

    To consider NOT having the thumb safety on with one in the chamber of my 1911 would be to me suicide - that 2# trigger moves almost by itself.

    My S&W 380 bodyguard went back to have its thumb safety loosened up so it was easily usable; it has such a hard trigger pull it may not need it, but why not make use of it and simply make it muscle memory so it is added safety? None of these safety's need add any time to defending yourself if you practice weekly with them.

  11. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by ezkl2230 View Post
    This is why I invest in firearms that do not have a thumb safety (and actually, those that have thumb safeties are in the minority these days). One less thing to worry about. There is a reason that most police departments have regulations against using firearms with thumb safeties; it is one more thing to think about and train for. They want to be able to deploy their firearm without having to worry about thumb safeties. One of the reasons I like the combination of the backstrap safety and safety trigger in the XD line.
    Lack of a safety is also why I like my Glock 21. It was also my last duty weapon before I retired from law enforcement.

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