New Semi-Automatic Owner Concerns? - Page 2
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Thread: New Semi-Automatic Owner Concerns?

  1. Quote Originally Posted by ReggieT View Post
    Thanks for the feedback.
    Going to take some classes and spend time at the range.
    After you've had a some training, if you're still nervous about having a chambered round, try this... Load a mag with live ammo. Top it off with a snap cap and chamber it. Now carry it around as if you would normally for a week or two. Check it every day and see if your firearm is still safe. You'd still have to chamber a round if you get into trouble, just like you are doing now. But this will give you the confidence that one in the chamber is safe to carry. No gun is going to magically go off by itself and a chambered snap cap will help prove it to you. I did this the first week I started carrying and it helped me overcome that scary feeling. Now, there is no way I would carry without one in the chamber. When the SHTF, it happens in an instant. It'll all be over with by the time you can chamber a round. Stay safe

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jumperj View Post
    After you've had a some training, if you're still nervous about having a chambered round, try this... Load a mag with live ammo. Top it off with a snap cap and chamber it. Now carry it around as if you would normally for a week or two. Check it every day and see if your firearm is still safe. You'd still have to chamber a round if you get into trouble, just like you are doing now. But this will give you the confidence that one in the chamber is safe to carry. No gun is going to magically go off by itself and a chambered snap cap will help prove it to you. I did this the first week I started carrying and it helped me overcome that scary feeling. Now, there is no way I would carry without one in the chamber. When the SHTF, it happens in an instant. It'll all be over with by the time you can chamber a round. Stay safe
    While this is a good recommendation as a feel-good measure, it really does not provide much impact in terms of learning safe gun handling. A firearm is certainly not going to go off by itself while in the holster. Instead, it is going off when the trigger is depressed by the user or by a foreign object. Having a snap cap in the chamber just implies that it is OK to violate firearm safety rules, since the gun is not loaded. Carrying an actually loaded gun forces you to think before you act, because of the consequences of improper handling.

    Note that most negligent discharges are due to a combination of improper procedure, distraction and exhaustion. The training fixes the procedure. The other two factors are situational and require awareness and not ignorance. Newbies have negligent discharges typically due to improper procedure and sometimes due to exhaustion. Experienced shooters have negligent discharges typically due to distraction and exhaustion, unless we are talking about the FUDD or LEO that claims he is an experienced shooter but really lacks in proper procedure.

    Not to beat a dead horse, but especially for a newbie, carrying with an empty chamber is more dangerous than carrying a loaded firearm. What if you actually have to use the firearm? Short-stroking the firearm or forgetting that it is not loaded is a common issue with newbies, in addition to the issue of not having a free hand or enough time to chamber a round. Why do I say it is a common issue? I am seeing this at the range during defensive pistol I classes, where a shooter comes to the range with an unloaded firearm because they don't feel comfortable carrying a loaded one. A few training drills and user-induced malfunctions later, they switch to always carrying a loaded firearm, especially once they realize that you re-holster a loaded firearm after shooting at a target anyway.


  4. Quote Originally Posted by bofh View Post
    While this is a good recommendation as a feel-good measure, it really does not provide much impact in terms of learning safe gun handling. A firearm is certainly not going to go off by itself while in the holster. Instead, it is going off when the trigger is depressed by the user or by a foreign object. Having a snap cap in the chamber just implies that it is OK to violate firearm safety rules, since the gun is not loaded. Carrying an actually loaded gun forces you to think before you act, because of the consequences of improper handling.

    Note that most negligent discharges are due to a combination of improper procedure, distraction and exhaustion. The training fixes the procedure. The other two factors are situational and require awareness and not ignorance. Newbies have negligent discharges typically due to improper procedure and sometimes due to exhaustion. Experienced shooters have negligent discharges typically due to distraction and exhaustion, unless we are talking about the FUDD or LEO that claims he is an experienced shooter but really lacks in proper procedure.

    Not to beat a dead horse, but especially for a newbie, carrying with an empty chamber is more dangerous than carrying a loaded firearm. What if you actually have to use the firearm? Short-stroking the firearm or forgetting that it is not loaded is a common issue with newbies, in addition to the issue of not having a free hand or enough time to chamber a round. Why do I say it is a common issue? I am seeing this at the range during defensive pistol I classes, where a shooter comes to the range with an unloaded firearm because they don't feel comfortable carrying a loaded one. A few training drills and user-induced malfunctions later, they switch to always carrying a loaded firearm, especially once they realize that you re-holster a loaded firearm after shooting at a target anyway.

    I see your point. My suggestion was only meant to be temporary. To prove to the OP that it won't just go off. (AFTER training in safe handling). It was in no way meant to be a means of carrying for self defense. It is an uneasy feeling, at first, knowing you have one in the pipe. If he's going to have an ND because he did something wrong, I'd rather him have it with a snap cap. I've always considered my firearms loaded. even when I used a snap cap. It was just a step I took in my training to show me if handled safely, It would not just go off.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by SR9 View Post
    ReggieT is new to this web site and already he found out it is a TROLL pond. No matter what thread you start, there is the same old bunch of Atheist trolls sitting there ready to pounce on a unsuspecting newbie.
    LOL...kinda makes me feel right @ home!
    A major chanisaw site helped me considerably...

    Been doing some range work and getting more familiar with it...
    My uncle used it to drop a rather burly coyote at about 25 yards...straight in the snout...turned him a flip!
    Hornady Critical Defense 115-grain

    Never been too fond of coyote tenderloin myself...

    Later

  6. I'd stick with the Shield. Top it off with one in the chamber, turn the safety off and leave it off. In a holster it won't discharge because the trigger is covered. When you unholster, it won't discharge because your index finger is pointing straight forward, off the trigger. The only time your gun will fire is when you put your finger on the trigger and pull. And that's exactly what you want. You'll get used to it. But lots of ammo and the next best investment you can make is in snap caps. (Besides some training.). Dry fire a lot. Daily if possible. And concealed carry from the time you get out of bed until you get back in bed. And be sure to get a good belt such as the Wilderness Instructor belt. Pretty soon it'll just be second nature.


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  7. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by scott_see View Post
    I'd stick with the Shield. Top it off with one in the chamber, turn the safety off and leave it off. In a holster it won't discharge because the trigger is covered. When you unholster, it won't discharge because your index finger is pointing straight forward, off the trigger. The only time your gun will fire is when you put your finger on the trigger and pull. And that's exactly what you want. You'll get used to it. But lots of ammo and the next best investment you can make is in snap caps. (Besides some training.). Dry fire a lot. Daily if possible. And concealed carry from the time you get out of bed until you get back in bed. And be sure to get a good belt such as the Wilderness Instructor belt. Pretty soon it'll just be second nature.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Well said......I carry my shield from the minute I get dressed till I go to bed.I use to be unsure of myself to carry with one in the chamber and safety off.I realized there is not enough time to rack a round much less think is the safety on or off when your life is on the line.The shield along with many striker fired handguns are totally safe carrying in condition zero.I would not have it any other way.Carry safe and carry always.....you never know when you may have to draw and no sense in not being completely ready.A good belt and holster can make or break you from carrying comfortably all day.

  8. Oh, I almost forgot. Buy pants one size bigger. New Semi-Automatic Owner Concerns?


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