Mistake buying the M&P Shield?
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Thread: Mistake buying the M&P Shield?

  1. Mistake buying the M&P Shield?

    Hey all first time poster here. I just replaced my XD 40 with a Glock 27 today (trade-in) because the XD was too large to conceal. While I was there I also purchased an M&P Shield 9mm for my wife for Christmas. This gun feels great in my hand and I love how small it is. However, the slide feels really stiff and she has a hard time pulling slides back as is. I also noticed on that gun that the slide release is really hard to push down -- is this intentional? Do they want you to release it slowly by pulling the slide back first? On my XD and Glock its very ease to drop the slide using the slide release button. I'm curious if the slide will "break in" eventually or if the gun is just designed that way.

    After I made the purchase I almost instantly regretted not getting a .38 special. Did I make a bad choice for a female carry?

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  3. Good idea to go to a range and rent several models before selecting your carry gun and allowed HER to select what she wants to carry. If she doesn't like it, she's not as likely to carry it.
    My wife did not like her S&W .38 Bodyguard but likes her Sig P238 (.380 ACP) - easy for her to rack the slide too.

    Lots of people like the Shield - with a GOOD BELT and holster, no reason it shouldnt carry well IWB or OWB.

  4. #3
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    Take your wife to a professional firearms instructor, potentially a women, that teaches her how to properly operate a firearm, including how to rack the slide. In short, instead of only pulling the slide backwards, you also push the gun forward at the same time. Unless your wife has an illness or is disabled, she should be able to rack the slide using the proper technique.

    The S&W M&P Shield 9mm is a fine handgun and field proven. There is nothing wrong with it. Simply do not use the slide stop lever as a slide release. Instead, rack the slide. This has been discussed in gun forums, including here, many times. Many professional firearms instructors do not teach to use the slide stop lever as a slide release. Mostly, because it simplifies the operation of a handgun, but also to reduce operator error.

    The simplification comes from using the same sequence of operations every time. For charging an empty firearm, simply insert the magazine, tap it and rack the slide. It doesn't matter if the slide is locked back or not. In contrast, when using the slide stop lever as a slide release, you have to think first. Is the slide locked back? If so, use the slide stop lever, if not rack the slide. Instead of leaning two procedures, one of which doesn't always work, learn only the one procedure that always works. The same goes for malfunction clearance:



    As for replacing a 8+1 9mm semi-auto with a 5- or 6-round .38 +P Special revolver, why? Less rounds of a less powerful caliber.

  5. Thanks for the reply. I guess I am just so use to my Xd and now Glock. Both allow the slide to release easily with the slide lock whereas the shield does not.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bofh View Post
    Take your wife to a professional firearms instructor, potentially a women, that teaches her how to properly operate a firearm, including how to rack the slide. In short, instead of only pulling the slide backwards, you also push the gun forward at the same time. Unless your wife has an illness or is disabled, she should be able to rack the slide using the proper technique.
    I'm glad that you added that. Quite right. I used to be able to rack with the above proper technique, so it does work. The only reason I cannot now is because of disabling illness.

    . . . As for replacing a 8+1 9mm semi-auto with a 5- or 6-round .38 +P Special revolver, why? Less rounds of a less powerful caliber.
    I have one of each, and can fire both but I can reload only the revolver. I have to have Hubby load my magazines and rack for me, which is fine for the range but probably not for a real-life event.

  7. #6
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    Perhaps I should add an additional insight: (1) 'Gun gamesmen' like to use a pistol's slide stop (release) in order to quickly drop a semi-auto's slide; however, (2) 'serious gunmen' (people who are trained in handgun self-defense) prefer to use the more secure, 'HOT*' method in order to charge/recharge a pistol.

    I've been training people to use handguns for many years; and, in my experience, women tend to do better with revolvers than they do with semiautomatics. The typical obstacle that most women have to overcome while learning how to use a revolver is mastering a double-action trigger. (Something which many men also don't know how to do well, either.)

    Whenever you either charge, recharge, or clear a semiautomatic pistol you should: Point the muzzle in a safe direction, and (1) push forward with your gun hand while, at the same time, (2) pulling backward with your support hand. This technique should make things easier for both your wife and yourself to work a pistol's slide.

    * 'HOT' = Support 'Hand Over Top' of the slide.

  8. I have had my shield for several months now. The more I shoot it the better it gets. You will notice a marked improvement on racking the slide after 50-100 rounds.
    I also think the trigger improved, but that could just be me getting use to it. The shield is a great gun.

  9. #8
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    I have trained many older, smaller, physically weaker ladies, some with varying amounts of arthritic joints, who have a great deal of difficulty working a slide. For some, it is just a matter of proper training and practice to learn how to do it. Others, however, still need something easier to operate.
    I happily discovered the Walther CCP which has a noticeably easier slide to rack. Next time you are at a range or gun store where you are able to do so, try ANY other semi auto, then try the CCP and see if you don't see a big difference.
    NOTE: I am not a Walther salesman, and received no consideration for this "product endorsement."

  10. I have a Shield 9mm and Yes the slide is hard to rack. I'm 6' 185lbs with extra large hands and it is the hardest slide to rack of any semi auto I own. My wife cannot rack the slide either. Don't listen to the people that say "she just needs training, practice, etc." Buy her a gun that fits her, that she can rack the slide and she likes from the get go. I bought my wife a bodyguard 380. She can rack the slide, has a trigger similar to a DA revolver, light enough to carry all the time. I know it's not a 9mm but a 380 that she carries ALL the time is better than a 9mm laying on the nightstand when she's out shopping or on her way home from work.

  11. Quote Originally Posted by sactown024 View Post
    Thanks for the reply. I guess I am just so use to my Xd and now Glock. Both allow the slide to release easily with the slide lock whereas the shield does not.
    Quote Originally Posted by Reba View Post
    I'm glad that you added that. Quite right. I used to be able to rack with the above proper technique, so it does work. The only reason I cannot now is because of disabling illness.


    I have one of each, and can fire both but I can reload only the revolver. I have to have Hubby load my magazines and rack for me, which is fine for the range but probably not for a real-life event.

    Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk

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