Multiple firearm platforms
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Thread: Multiple firearm platforms

  1. Multiple firearm platforms

    Have not begun carrying concealed yet, I have a Glock 19 and 43, I also have a Springfield Armory EMP4. Question: Am I setting myself up for trouble by wanting to carry different firearm types at different times? I realize that if I carry my 1911 for awhile (disengaging the safety during the draw) and then switch to a Glock no harm no foul if I forget and go to disengage safety, no safety present so haven't lost anything. However, if I am carrying my Glock and switch to the 1911 and draw but forget to disengage safety because I have Glock on the brain, I'm in trouble when I press the trigger (no bang!). Is it wiser to stick with one platform, thus eliminating the possibility of this occurrence...or is switching between the platforms a viable task. Appreciate any and all feedback...Thank you.

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  3. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy1965 View Post
    Have not begun carrying concealed yet, I have a Glock 19 and 43, I also have a Springfield Armory EMP4. Question: Am I setting myself up for trouble by wanting to carry different firearm types at different times? I realize that if I carry my 1911 for awhile (disengaging the safety during the draw) and then switch to a Glock no harm no foul if I forget and go to disengage safety, no safety present so haven't lost anything. However, if I am carrying my Glock and switch to the 1911 and draw but forget to disengage safety because I have Glock on the brain, I'm in trouble when I press the trigger (no bang!). Is it wiser to stick with one platform, thus eliminating the possibility of this occurrence...or is switching between the platforms a viable task. Appreciate any and all feedback...Thank you.
    You haven't started carrying concealed yet so, do you open carry? If so, which weapon do you use the most? Why? Most comfortable feel and to use? Then I would think you would want to carry the one you are most comfortable with as an EDC. Dress around the gun, not vice versa. It is nice to use several different guns on the range and to become proficient in them but, the one you practice with and carry the most is the one to save your life. As bofh says in his signature line, "Amateurs train until they get it right. Professionals train until they cannot get it wrong.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    If you ever have to use that gun it's going to be under the most stressful conditions you've ever had to face and it will probably be over in less time than it took you to read this paragraph so if you make any mistakes you probably won't have time to correct them.

    I don't carry guns with manual safeties. I've seen to many people on a square range forget to flip the safety off to trust one in a real fight.
    In an emergency individuals do not rise to the occasion, they fall to the level of their MASTERED training
    Barrett Tillman

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    Train and practice, then those questions answer themselves. Training is learning under supervision of an instructor. Practice is mastering what you have learned in training through repetition. In addition to my signature, internalize Eidolon's signature:

    In an emergency individuals do not rise to the occasion, they fall to the level of their MASTERED training.
    While an expert shooter will be able to use whatever firearm is available, becoming such an expert involves a lot of training, practice and dedication. The KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid) principle allows students to progress and to learn over time how to deal with more complex issues. That's why it is highly recommended to carry firearms that have the same manual of arms, i.e., mode of operation, and limit different carry positions.

    When you need to defend yourself, you do not want to think about which gun are you carrying today and where: Is it the Glock with no manual safety, the 1911 with the frame-mounted thumb safety, or the Beretta with the slide-mounted reverse-operating thumb safety. Is it at the 4-o'clock position, at the appendix position, in the pant pocket or on the ankle?

    Tex Grebner shot himself in the leg during practice with a 1911. This was entirely due to training deficiencies combined with different manual of arms and different holsters:



    I personally don't carry handguns with manual safeties, as they tend to get in the way.

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