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  1. Quote Originally Posted by bofh View Post
    I hope this is a Type G (decocker and no manual safety) and not Type F (decocker and manual safety)!

    You have to point the barrel away from your legs anyway to maintain the rules of firearm safety. There is a method where you hold the gun one-handed with your thumb on the back of the grip (not the slide!). It's a bit awkward and usually only used for left-handed type 3 malfunction clearance on a handgun that has the slide stop on the right side. I still would not advise to rack the slide one-handed using the decocker ear, though. Also, this isn't going to work left-handed as the ejection port will be facing your body.

    I am not an instructor and, by your own admission, you have not had the training. I highly advise you to take a training class and work with an instructor on this. The instructor will observe what you are doing and check if it is done safely.

    With a good rear sight that has a straight edge, you can rack that slide at almost anything, such as on the belt through a shirt (no need to lift up the shirt or hit the belt buckle).

    If you read my earlier post, I mention that I had done the conversion to a type G but kept the ears. I don't know where you saw that I had no training, just that I stumbled across this during training. I have no problem racking the slide this way but as I said, it would be an extreme need for this to happen. I DID say, I need to train with this method more to actually be comfortable with it. I can't imagine it being any less safe than racking with the sights...which isn't posible on this pistol.
    Just curious though...why would you NOT recommend using the ear for racking? I know that's not what it's intended to do but neither is the sight. And you lost me with the "thumb on the back of the grip (not the slide!), statement. Are you assuming my thumb is on the slide? Was it because I said I scraped my thumb knuckle? I assure you, my grip is fine & my knuckle scrapes because it's close proximity to the holster when I perform this action.
    If you can get your hands on one of these guns, try it...unloaded of course...& you'll better understand what I'm talking about. Like I said, it's just one more tool in the box if you need it...which hopefully, you nor I will. Hope for the best, prepare for the worst.

    Sent from my SM-T377P using Tapatalk

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poppy55 View Post
    If you read my earlier post, I mention that I had done the conversion to a type G but kept the ears. I don't know where you saw that I had no training, just that I stumbled across this during training. I have no problem racking the slide this way but as I said, it would be an extreme need for this to happen. I DID say, I need to train with this method more to actually be comfortable with it. I can't imagine it being any less safe than racking with the sights...which isn't posible on this pistol.
    Just curious though...why would you NOT recommend using the ear for racking? I know that's not what it's intended to do but neither is the sight. And you lost me with the "thumb on the back of the grip (not the slide!), statement. Are you assuming my thumb is on the slide? Was it because I said I scraped my thumb knuckle? I assure you, my grip is fine & my knuckle scrapes because it's close proximity to the holster when I perform this action.
    If you can get your hands on one of these guns, try it...unloaded of course...& you'll better understand what I'm talking about. Like I said, it's just one more tool in the box if you need it...which hopefully, you nor I will. Hope for the best, prepare for the worst.

    Sent from my SM-T377P using Tapatalk
    I asked you "Did anyone teach you this method?" You said "No"! So you didn't learn this in training! Training is when you learn something in a class from an instructor. Practice is when you apply what you have learned to gain muscle and mental memory and to perfect a procedure you have learned in training.

    It's not about what something is intended for, but how the procedure works, what the risks are, and what the benefits are. For example, if you perform the procedure fast or if you slip off what ever you use as a ledge to rack the slide, is there a risk that you will violate the rules of firearm safety? I already mentioned that this can't be done left handed as the ejection port is covered, which is a strict no-no for this method.

    I practice my one-handed technique at the range with a loaded firearm once a month. In fact, I will do this later today. The technique using the sights is so ingrained in me that I use it without stopping to think about it. I load the firearm with a mix of real and dummy rounds. If I encounter a dummy round during practice, I tap, rack and continue to shoot. If I encounter a dummy round right after the tap and rack, I practice the type three malfunction drill and swap magazines. I do setup separate type three malfunction drills as well. I practice all of this right hand only and left hand only, including the draw. I have been trained by instructors, such as Reid Henrichs, on how to do that. A buddy of mine functions as a RSO and watches me to check that I don't violate the rules of firearm safety.

  4. Quote Originally Posted by bofh View Post
    I asked you "Did anyone teach you this method?" You said "No"! So you didn't learn this in training! Training is when you learn something in a class from an instructor. Practice is when you apply what you have learned to gain muscle and mental memory and to perfect a procedure you have learned in training.

    It's not about what something is intended for, but how the procedure works, what the risks are, and what the benefits are. For example, if you perform the procedure fast or if you slip off what ever you use as a ledge to rack the slide, is there a risk that you will violate the rules of firearm safety? I already mentioned that this can't be done left handed as the ejection port is covered, which is a strict no-no for this method.

    I practice my one-handed technique at the range with a loaded firearm once a month. In fact, I will do this later today. The technique using the sights is so ingrained in me that I use it without stopping to think about it. I load the firearm with a mix of real and dummy rounds. If I encounter a dummy round during practice, I tap, rack and continue to shoot. If I encounter a dummy round right after the tap and rack, I practice the type three malfunction drill and swap magazines. I do setup separate type three malfunction drills as well. I practice all of this right hand only and left hand only, including the draw. I have been trained by instructors, such as Reid Henrichs, on how to do that. A buddy of mine functions as a RSO and watches me to check that I don't violate the rules of firearm safety.
    "I am not an instructor and, by your own admission, you have not had the training. I highly advise you to take a training class and work with an instructor on this."

    I think this is the misunderstanding. You're right, I haven't had an instructor show me this...but you didn't stop there when you added the next line. That's what caused me to question your assumption. Just like assuming it wouldn't work left handed, or that I might be sweeping someone or something while doing this. If you haven't tried it, don't "instruct".
    The angle used to rack it, gives plenty enough room to eject a casing, even though it's intention is more to rack a new round from a fresh mag...like in the video you shared, with a slide lock...but the angle isn't so strong as to be pointing the muzzle in an unsafe direction.
    As I said, it's something I stumbled on & only do it in a dry fire practice. Duly noted on going over it with my instructor.
    I've seen a video of someone (can't recall who...but one of the more "popular" internet "instructors") actually rack a slide one handed, using only the inertia of forcefully "pushing" the gun forward. You can't tell me THAT was something taught in a class! I appreciate your input & concerns though. We can never be TOO careful.

    Wayne

    Sent from my SM-T377P using Tapatalk

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poppy55 View Post
    "I am not an instructor and, by your own admission, you have not had the training. I highly advise you to take a training class and work with an instructor on this."

    I think this is the misunderstanding. You're right, I haven't had an instructor show me this...but you didn't stop there when you added the next line. That's what caused me to question your assumption. Just like assuming it wouldn't work left handed, or that I might be sweeping someone or something while doing this. If you haven't tried it, don't "instruct".
    The angle used to rack it, gives plenty enough room to eject a casing, even though it's intention is more to rack a new round from a fresh mag...like in the video you shared, with a slide lock...but the angle isn't so strong as to be pointing the muzzle in an unsafe direction.
    As I said, it's something I stumbled on & only do it in a dry fire practice. Duly noted on going over it with my instructor.
    I've seen a video of someone (can't recall who...but one of the more "popular" internet "instructors") actually rack a slide one handed, using only the inertia of forcefully "pushing" the gun forward. You can't tell me THAT was something taught in a class! I appreciate your input & concerns though. We can never be TOO careful.

    Wayne

    Sent from my SM-T377P using Tapatalk
    Feel free to post a video of your technique. From what I gather, you are racking the run with the side (and not top) of the slide pressed against some edge, such as a holster or belt. I guess there is a way to angle the gun, such that the "ear" catches the edge but the ejection port stays free. Realize though that a truly free ejection port has nothing near it. I have seen rounds getting ejected and bounced straight back into the ejection port in other drills when the ejection port was about two to three inches away from something.

    One-handed racking of the slide is not only for loading a fresh magazine, but also to fix malfunctions. When the gun doesn't go boom, you tap, rack and try again! The slide doesn't lock back on a light primer strike or on a failure to eject.

    That inertia thing is nonsense. It's a good way to jam up your gun. The, so called, instructors demonstrating this typically use worn out, light, or no recoil springs or models with heavy slides.


  6. Quote Originally Posted by bofh View Post
    Feel free to post a video of your technique. From what I gather, you are racking the run with the side (and not top) of the slide pressed against some edge, such as a holster or belt. I guess there is a way to angle the gun, such that the "ear" catches the edge but the ejection port stays free. Realize though that a truly free ejection port has nothing near it. I have seen rounds getting ejected and bounced straight back into the ejection port in other drills when the ejection port was about two to three inches away from something.

    One-handed racking of the slide is not only for loading a fresh magazine, but also to fix malfunctions. When the gun doesn't go boom, you tap, rack and try again! The slide doesn't lock back on a light primer strike or on a failure to eject.

    That inertia thing is nonsense. It's a good way to jam up your gun. The, so called, instructors demonstrating this typically use worn out, light, or no recoil springs or models with heavy slides.

    Thats the video (pretty sure) I was referring to. I agree with it being a weak spring or just BS. Even a heavy slide would be doubtful to pull this of but hey, I wasn't there.
    I'll post a video when & if I feel comfortable in showing this on a public forum...since I'm NOT an instructor. For now, it's a something I'll just do in private. I have nothing to prove or promote but only was sharing an idea. Time will tell if it's a feasable one or not.

    Sent from my SM-T377P using Tapatalk

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poppy55 View Post
    Thats the video (pretty sure) I was referring to. I agree with it being a weak spring or just BS. Even a heavy slide would be doubtful to pull this of but hey, I wasn't there.
    I'll post a video when & if I feel comfortable in showing this on a public forum...since I'm NOT an instructor. For now, it's a something I'll just do in private. I have nothing to prove or promote but only was sharing an idea. Time will tell if it's a feasable one or not.
    If you have a gun with a slide can be easily racked with inertia, such as a Hi-Point, it also means it can be easily moved out of battery with inertia and not fire. I certainly would not want to have such a gun in a fight, as it could cost me my life.

    Feel free to do all kinds of things with your gun in private, but racking the slide with inertia is a recipe for creating a malfunction. It is something that one could do as a movie or TV actor or in a circus, but in a deadly force situation such foolishness can cost you your life or the life of someone else.

    There is all kinds of tacticool nonsense on the Internet. Just because someone can do those things doesn't mean you should learn those things.

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