First Time CCW, TONS of Questions
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Thread: First Time CCW, TONS of Questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Anchorage, AK formerly of SF, Kommiefornia
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    First Time CCW, TONS of Questions

    I finally got a pistol (my first, a 1911) and Iím ready to start learning about concealed carry. Iíve actually already begun to carry it (yesterday was my first day) but feel nervous and unconfident about itÖ In less than 8 hours of carrying Iíve already got a bunch of questions.

    --------------------

    Most important to me right now is my hearing impairment (henceforth worded as HI for Hearing Impaired) and my interaction with beings because of it. Iíve been severely HI since birth. I wear two hearing aids (Iím about 80% deaf in each ear) and interact using a 75-25 ratio of lip-reading to hearing.

    As a result I oftentimes get close to people, even complete strangers in a dark alley (as I did once). Iíll even turn my head so my better hearing ear faces the speaker. This is a huge no-no in the rules of self defense. As you know, distance buys time giving you a better chance of survival.

    Allowing people to close the gap has actually cost me a concussion and the loss of my wallet, my text messaging device, a box cutter, and strangely an ugly neon-yellow water bottle.

    SoÖ with this in mind, how can I compromise? I donít want to go around being a **** to everyone by avoiding people and/or commanding them to stay 25 feet away. The thought is purely absurd!


    Of second importance is identifying places that do not allow concealed carry. Iím aware that abuse shelters, federal buildings, banks, school yards, and bars do not allow concealed carry, permit or no.

    Then on that list, add on any business that post a ďno weapons signĒ. How easily identifiable are these signs? Where are they placed? Except for the library I canít recall seeing a no-gun sign. Is there a standard sign that is posted? I assume such a sign would be posted on the entranceway of the business, but where else should I look?

    I am usually on foot. If I see such a sign on a business I want to enter, can I simply put the pistol, unloaded, in my backpack/bag? Or do I go home, drop off the pistol and try again (this assumes I have to go in that store)?


    Iím carrying my pistol in a left handed ComTac Infidel IWB holster. Itís a bit uncomfortable, and Iím not quite sure where to wear it. The guy at the gunstore (Northern Security on Old Seward in Anchorage) said to wear it back, between the hip and the butt cheek. This makes for an awkward draw and when looking in a mirror, the grip sticks out beyond my body. This makes for an obvious print.

    I tried wearing it on my hip but itís immediately uncomfortable. I found if I cant it itís comfortable but it never stays canted. In either position my extra fat tends to press against the holster and when remoistening, gets pinched by the ambi safety. Iím by no means a fat guy, but overweight for sure.

    What are your tips on proper placement? I assume getting rid of the gut will fix the pinch point and that is being worked on.


    Perhaps the problem with the above is my clothing, so Iím asking for tips on that. I try to be stylish so I typically wear slim fitting shirts (tees, polos, and sometimes button-downs) and jeans. Here in Alaska its winter so obviously itís easy to wear a sweater with a jacket to cover it all up.

    I am moving to California and need tips on dressing for that warm climate (I am also aware of Californiaís harsh gun laws, but will obtain a permit before I even think of concealed carry).


    Whatís the consensus on spare mags? Are they needed? I use Wilson Combat 47D, so I have 9 rounds at my disposal. Should I carry extra mags? I have a total of 3 47Dís and the mag the Colt came with.

    How many mags and whatís the preferred method of carry? Pocket? Mag holster?


    Training: very important in order to maximize your effectiveness. Should I attend a school (which is expensive and would take a while) or can I start learning by teaching myself?

    The one problem I see with teaching myself is that I would pick up bad habits that could be hard to undo. But if I wait until Iíve enough money to save for transportation fares and the tuition for school, I may come into a situation where I need to use my pistol before training, and that could be disastrous.

    Whatís a good compromise?


    Hereís a short one (ah finally!). Suggested reading. What books should I pick up and read?


    How can I find out if the community college Iím going to allows concealed carry? Iíve heard a University in Utah allows it, so I assume there may be others. Not likely, being in California, but worth a try.

    Getting a permit in California. How can I increase my chances of obtaining a permit? I took basic lessons once with an active (at the time) police officer. Would knowing him/having received training from him improve my chances?

    Also, if I live in a particularly strict district/county/city, can I apply for a CCW permit in another county legally?

    Thanks for reading through my post. It was long but hopefully I can get some good answers here.

    If any of you want specifics, details, or info on what happened on when I got mugged, please feel free to ask. I simply didnít put it in here to avoid making this a 30 minute read.

    Thanks,
    Jason

  2.   
  3. #2
    As far as your question about magazines I feel that not carry an extra mag or mags defeats one of the reasons to carryh an auto in the first place that being able to easily carry more rounds and quickly reload when necessary.
    By faith Noah,being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear,prepared an ark to the saving of his house;by the which he condemned the world,and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith Heb.11:7

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Honolulu, HI & Salt Lake City, UT
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    2,797
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason762 View Post
    I finally got a pistol (my first, a 1911) and Iím ready to start learning about concealed carry. Iíve actually already begun to carry it (yesterday was my first day) but feel nervous and unconfident about itÖ In less than 8 hours of carrying Iíve already got a bunch of questions.

    --------------------

    Most important to me right now is my hearing impairment (henceforth worded as HI for Hearing Impaired) and my interaction with beings because of it. Iíve been severely HI since birth. I wear two hearing aids (Iím about 80% deaf in each ear) and interact using a 75-25 ratio of lip-reading to hearing.

    As a result I oftentimes get close to people, even complete strangers in a dark alley (as I did once). Iíll even turn my head so my better hearing ear faces the speaker. This is a huge no-no in the rules of self defense. As you know, distance buys time giving you a better chance of survival.

    Allowing people to close the gap has actually cost me a concussion and the loss of my wallet, my text messaging device, a box cutter, and strangely an ugly neon-yellow water bottle.

    SoÖ with this in mind, how can I compromise? I donít want to go around being a **** to everyone by avoiding people and/or commanding them to stay 25 feet away. The thought is purely absurd!

    First and foremost, you should be concerned with your safety. Being that you already got jacked in the past, you may want to seriously consider your options. I strongly recommend taking a class from a professional who understands your condition and will be able to work with you to find a solution that makes sense. It may cost you a little money for the class, but keep in mind that no amount of money can replace your life or the lives of others. Consider the fact that you now carry a loaded firearm. Think about what would happen if some BG got possession of the said loaded firearm. They will have at least 9 rounds at their disposal, meaning potentially 9 people can be killed by your firearm. I'll say it again, I strongly recommend that you take a class from a professional firearms instructor. Keep in mind that if any technique doesn't sound right, feel free to question the instructor to find out the reasoning of the technique. Any professional instructor will be able to answer your question. A simple "because I said so" or "because this is the exercise" doesn't cut it.


    Of second importance is identifying places that do not allow concealed carry. Iím aware that abuse shelters, federal buildings, banks, school yards, and bars do not allow concealed carry, permit or no.

    Then on that list, add on any business that post a ďno weapons signĒ. How easily identifiable are these signs? Where are they placed? Except for the library I canít recall seeing a no-gun sign. Is there a standard sign that is posted? I assume such a sign would be posted on the entrance way of the business, but where else should I look?

    I strongly recommend finding an attorney who has experience with criminal defense cases that involved firearms. They will be able to give you "legal advice" and the "correct" answers to your questions. The opinion of the attorney should help you in making your decision as to what you'll be doing in any particular situation. Keep in mind that the attorney may charge you for the consultation. Consider the old saying "you get what you pay for" when seeking advice online. Again, it may cost you a couple of hundred dollars or so, but that might be the difference between keeping you out of jail and facing criminal charges. Another option would be to contact the State Attorney General or local City Prosecutor/District Attorney. They're duty bound to give you an accurate interpretation of the law. They will be the ones responsible for filing criminal charges against you should you be found in violation of the law. Get their opinion in writing (email or snail mail) and keep it in a safe place.

    I am usually on foot. If I see such a sign on a business I want to enter, can I simply put the pistol, unloaded, in my backpack/bag? Or do I go home, drop off the pistol and try again (this assumes I have to go in that store)?

    Check your local laws and consult an attorney. Whatever you do, don't get any "legal advice" from a Law Enforcement Officer.


    Iím carrying my pistol in a left handed ComTac Infidel IWB holster. Itís a bit uncomfortable, and Iím not quite sure where to wear it. The guy at the gunstore (Northern Security on Old Seward in Anchorage) said to wear it back, between the hip and the butt cheek. This makes for an awkward draw and when looking in a mirror, the grip sticks out beyond my body. This makes for an obvious print.

    I tried wearing it on my hip but itís immediately uncomfortable. I found if I cant it itís comfortable but it never stays canted. In either position my extra fat tends to press against the holster and when remoistening, gets pinched by the ambi safety. Iím by no means a fat guy, but overweight for sure.

    What are your tips on proper placement? I assume getting rid of the gut will fix the pinch point and that is being worked on.

    Most of us who have been around firearms for a while have a "collection" of holsters. I have a box that contains roughly 2 dozen or so holsters that were either uncomfortable or otherwise found to be "not acceptable" for my personal needs. I strongly recommend trying a variety of holsters as well as experiment with different carry methods to determine what would be best for you. A professional firearms instructor can help you with this. A lot of times we fall for the sales pitch from the guy in the gun store. Sometimes it works out, other times it doesn't. All of the reputable gun shops I've been to will allow you to try on the holsters and have "blue guns" available for you to check out the fit of the holster. Some of them allow you to return the holster if you find that it doesn't work out the way you would like it to. Check with the store before purchasing your holster. There's so many holster models and manufacturers out there that there's no excuse for your holster to be "uncomfortable".


    Perhaps the problem with the above is my clothing, so Iím asking for tips on that. I try to be stylish so I typically wear slim fitting shirts (tees, polos, and sometimes button-downs) and jeans. Here in Alaska its winter so obviously itís easy to wear a sweater with a jacket to cover it all up.

    Consulting with an experienced firearms instructor will help you with your wardrobe and carry methods.

    I am moving to California and need tips on dressing for that warm climate (I am also aware of Californiaís harsh gun laws, but will obtain a permit before I even think of concealed carry).


    Whatís the consensus on spare mags? Are they needed? I use Wilson Combat 47D, so I have 9 rounds at my disposal. Should I carry extra mags? I have a total of 3 47Dís and the mag the Colt came with.

    How many mags and whatís the preferred method of carry? Pocket? Mag holster?

    A minimum of 1 spare mag is a must. If you carry a BUG (back up gun) where legal and have the capability of carrying a reload for it (speed loader for wheel guns or magazine for semi-autos), then I strongly recommend doing so. Nothing worse than running out of ammo during a gun fight.


    Training: very important in order to maximize your effectiveness. Should I attend a school (which is expensive and would take a while) or can I start learning by teaching myself?

    The one problem I see with teaching myself is that I would pick up bad habits that could be hard to undo. But if I wait until Iíve enough money to save for transportation fares and the tuition for school, I may come into a situation where I need to use my pistol before training, and that could be disastrous.

    Whatís a good compromise?

    Sounds like you have very limited experience with firearms. I strongly recommend taking classes from a professional instructor. We're not talking about having a bad day on the golf course. A mistake with a firearm can be catastrophic!


    Hereís a short one (ah finally!). Suggested reading. What books should I pick up and read?

    I'm not a book guy, so no recommended reading.


    How can I find out if the community college Iím going to allows concealed carry? Iíve heard a University in Utah allows it, so I assume there may be others. Not likely, being in California, but worth a try.

    Getting a permit in California. How can I increase my chances of obtaining a permit? I took basic lessons once with an active (at the time) police officer. Would knowing him/having received training from him improve my chances?

    Also, if I live in a particularly strict district/county/city, can I apply for a CCW permit in another county legally?

    Getting a permit in CA is darn near impossible. There are a few people on this list that are familiar with CA firearms laws. I'd check with them. ("CA CCWinstructor" comes to mind)

    Thanks for reading through my post. It was long but hopefully I can get some good answers here.

    If any of you want specifics, details, or info on what happened on when I got mugged, please feel free to ask. I simply didnít put it in here to avoid making this a 30 minute read.

    Thanks,
    Jason

    Hope I've been able to answer your questions.


    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kalifornia & Idaho
    Posts
    1,052
    What are your tips on proper placement? I assume getting rid of the gut will fix the pinch point and that is being worked on.
    You have to find what's comfortable for you. I like to carry IWB at about 10-11 o'clock. I find it easy to conceal with many loose light shirts (or any sweater or sweatshirt). Appendix carry (1 or 2 o'clock) is recommended by many. I carry my phone on my belt on the left so I think it helps hide the gun. You do need to be careful that you don't expose the gun when you get your phone.

    I also like a "belly band" high under my arm (like a shoulder holster only under whatever shirt I'm wearing) but it is "deep cover" and very slow to get to.

    How can I find out if the community college Iím going to allows concealed carry?
    State law says you can't carry in any schools (with a few exceptions, very few).

    Getting a permit in California. How can I increase my chances of obtaining a permit? I took basic lessons once with an active (at the time) police officer. Would knowing him/having received training from him improve my chances?
    It will depend more on what county you move to than anything else. In all the big (population-wise) counties it will be almost impossible. Kern County is about the only county you can have a fairly good chance (that I know about though I understand some of the northern counties and other small counties issue). You will need "good cause" for having a permit. A job where you have to carry a bunch of money, threats have been made against you, etc..

    Also, if I live in a particularly strict district/county/city, can I apply for a CCW permit in another county legally?

    Basically no, though it is possible to get a permit where you work as opposed to where you live. I believe those usually come with strong restrictions.
    Maybejim

    Life Member NRA
    Life Member CRPA
    Life Member SASS

    What you say isn't as important as what the other person hears

  6. First of all, congrats on the CCW permit! I'll try to answer your questions the best I can.

    Quote Originally Posted by jason762 View Post
    most important to me right now is my hearing impairment (henceforth worded as hi for hearing impaired) and my interaction with beings because of it. Iíve been severely hi since birth. I wear two hearing aids (iím about 80% deaf in each ear) and interact using a 75-25 ratio of lip-reading to hearing.

    As a result i oftentimes get close to people, even complete strangers in a dark alley (as i did once). Iíll even turn my head so my better hearing ear faces the speaker. This is a huge no-no in the rules of self defense. As you know, distance buys time giving you a better chance of survival.

    Allowing people to close the gap has actually cost me a concussion and the loss of my wallet, my text messaging device, a box cutter, and strangely an ugly neon-yellow water bottle.

    SoÖ with this in mind, how can i compromise? I donít want to go around being a **** to everyone by avoiding people and/or commanding them to stay 25 feet away. The thought is purely absurd!
    Well this is something you're going to have to figure out on your own, really. Noone can really give you advice on the burden you bear unless they too are mostly HI. Good thing I know sign language! :)

    The problem with your impairment is that you HAVE to get in close. Unfortunately, you might not know you're in danger until you're IN danger. If you plan on carrying all the time, you are going to have to practice very diligently at drawing your firearm from your holster. Stand in an open space, DOUBLE CHECK THAT YOUR FIREARM IS UNLOADED (safe direction and all), and practice drawing. Don't cut corners. Pull your clothing down over your firearm just like you were at the mall and practice. Personally, I draw with my right so I take my left hand and grab my clothing on my right side and pull up thus giving me enough of an opening to properly draw. I'll tell you about the "bowie sweep" down when I talk about california.

    Being able to draw fast could help compensate for your lack of reaction time in a draw situation. Just make sure drawing your firearm is the only option for you.

    of second importance is identifying places that do not allow concealed carry. Iím aware that abuse shelters, federal buildings, banks, school yards, and bars do not allow concealed carry, permit or no.

    Then on that list, add on any business that post a ďno weapons signĒ. How easily identifiable are these signs? Where are they placed? Except for the library i canít recall seeing a no-gun sign. Is there a standard sign that is posted? I assume such a sign would be posted on the entranceway of the business, but where else should i look?

    I am usually on foot. If i see such a sign on a business i want to enter, can i simply put the pistol, unloaded, in my backpack/bag? Or do i go home, drop off the pistol and try again (this assumes i have to go in that store)?
    Okay, about no gun signs. I covered this in my post in the Connecticut forum already but i'll paraphrase for you.

    The no gun signs are 90% a deterrent. Most places that have them do not have any legal grounds against you carrying on their premises. They might have rules that say they reserve the right to ask you to leave, but you cant really get in trouble. Hey, if they see your gun and ask you to leave, it's your fault anyways because you're not concealing it properly. It's a CONCEAL CARRY PERMIT :) .

    As far as places you're legally obliged to NOT carry, use common sense. Don't go to school with it. Don't go to your local state police barracks with it. Don't carry it during your interview with... I dunno... Puppy training. Whatever. Just use your head. If you're not sure, maybe don't bring it, or call the local authorities and ask. I/we/they would rather you asked than went ahead though unsure.

    iím carrying my pistol in a left handed comtac infidel iwb holster. Itís a bit uncomfortable, and iím not quite sure where to wear it. The guy at the gunstore (northern security on old seward in anchorage) said to wear it back, between the hip and the butt cheek. This makes for an awkward draw and when looking in a mirror, the grip sticks out beyond my body. This makes for an obvious print.

    I tried wearing it on my hip but itís immediately uncomfortable. I found if i cant it itís comfortable but it never stays canted. In either position my extra fat tends to press against the holster and when remoistening, gets pinched by the ambi safety. Iím by no means a fat guy, but overweight for sure.

    What are your tips on proper placement? I assume getting rid of the gut will fix the pinch point and that is being worked on.
    Go leftys! I'm actually a lefty as well. I just like working on both sides. Plus my first gun was a right hander so like you said, old habits die hard. First and foremost, if the holster is just plain uncomfortable no matter where you put it, chances are its the wrong one. That being said, wearing a holster takes some getting used to. You're kind of carrying a big, clunky metal thing on the side of your body. You definatly need to look into either looser fitting clothing, or some kind of unzipped/unbuttoned overshirt that stays open (i.e gets caught in the wind as you walk). You have a 1911 which isn't the smallest of guns so remember that the next time you buy a shirt. Make sure you're always thinking, "does this make my gun look fat?". It's important to have a full length mirror or understanding acquaintance around to ask about what is called your gun's "profile", as in "high profile" or "low profile".

    As far as "canting" and "uncanting", i'm going to have to assume you mean holstering and de-holstering. If your gun is de-holstering its self when carrying, you need to stop carrying with that holster immediately. Perhaps getting one with a locking mechanism like a strap or retention lock? I have no idea what you mean by "re-moistening" though. Please clarify this.

    Is your holster an inside or outside the pant holster? If inside, you'll need to increase the size of your pants by at least two inches. I fit a 32, so I do 34.

    Outside the pant causes alot of issues with profiling. Your firearm protrudes alot farther than it does with an inside holster. In the winter its less of an issue due to heavy clothing but in the summer you might want an inside holster.

    Perhaps the problem with the above is my clothing, so iím asking for tips on that. I try to be stylish so i typically wear slim fitting shirts (tees, polos, and sometimes button-downs) and jeans. Here in alaska its winter so obviously itís easy to wear a sweater with a jacket to cover it all up.

    I am moving to california and need tips on dressing for that warm climate (i am also aware of californiaís harsh gun laws, but will obtain a permit before i even think of concealed carry).
    Well you also have to think about how well you can draw with the clothing you're wearing. Stiff jackets are almost impossible to draw with if zipped up whereas a cotton jacket is much easier.

    I would suggest an opened button down shirt over a tee-shirt in warmer climates. The over shirt makes it impossible to see when standing and keeps you cool still. You might want to consider buying a smaller gun when you get there. A .380 caliber works very nicely during light outfitting yet still holds a big enough punch to take someone by surprise.

    About the "bowie sweep". This is another way to get clothing out of the way. It's somewhat featured in the movie "man on fire" during the initial fire fight to kidnap Pita. Anyone who's seen the movie knows what i'm talking about. What you're going to do is with your master hand (the hand that does most of the work), straighten your fingers out like a karate chop. As you reach back for your gun, rotate your hand inward so your palm is facing almost behind you. Push your outer clothing back using your fingertips then grab your firearm. If you have a second shirt OVER your gun, reach with your left hand and pull up like I was saying before so that both hands are working. If not, make a fist with your free hand (thumb on the side) and put the palm side of your hand against your chest, right in the middle as you're drawing. This is so that you know where your free hand is at all times of combat. It's easy to lose track of such things when you're ready to kill someone. Plus its easier to move that hand into position because it's "on the way".

    Personally, I do something similar. With my gun hand, I put four fingers extended (pinky back) and as I reach back, I grab the tee-shirt over my gun with my pinky. Then with my extended fingers I do something like a back-handed slap to my over jacket or shirt. I find that this gives me a gripping ability when I grab my shirt, and also gives me an idea of exactly where I need to grab to get the gun in my hand.

    whatís the consensus on spare mags? Are they needed? I use wilson combat 47d, so i have 9 rounds at my disposal. Should i carry extra mags? I have a total of 3 47dís and the mag the colt came with.

    How many mags and whatís the preferred method of carry? Pocket? Mag holster?
    I'm ALWAYS carrying at least one extra, but with my glock I carry two on my other side. ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS use a proper mag holster. Never just stash them in your pocket. They will be useless there if you try to get them out in a firefight.

    training: Very important in order to maximize your effectiveness. Should i attend a school (which is expensive and would take a while) or can i start learning by teaching myself?

    The one problem i see with teaching myself is that i would pick up bad habits that could be hard to undo. But if i wait until iíve enough money to save for transportation fares and the tuition for school, i may come into a situation where i need to use my pistol before training, and that could be disastrous.

    Whatís a good compromise?
    Well, you could take a tactical shooting course. There are many that are relatively inexpensive. Your local store will have a few that they no doubtedly sponsor, but if you look around online you might find some local hobbyists who probably know more. The best way to get better is by practicing. Like I said, stand there, check that your gun is safe, and practice by starting out at a slow speed and work your way up. When the tip of your firearm clears your holster, immediately point the gun forward toward your target. As you rise the gun to your eyes, bring your other hand up to grab the gun. Your free hand should already be positioned (i.e cupped like it is over your other hand) while it's on it's way to actually grabbing the gun. When you eventually practice at the range, start firing after you've cleared the holster and are pointing forward. Remember to take it slow until you are comfortable doing it faster.

    hereís a short one (ah finally!). Suggested reading. What books should i pick up and read?


    How can i find out if the community college iím going to allows concealed carry? Iíve heard a university in utah allows it, so i assume there may be others. Not likely, being in california, but worth a try.

    Getting a permit in california. How can i increase my chances of obtaining a permit? I took basic lessons once with an active (at the time) police officer. Would knowing him/having received training from him improve my chances?

    Also, if i live in a particularly strict district/county/city, can i apply for a ccw permit in another county legally?

    Thanks for reading through my post. It was long but hopefully i can get some good answers here.

    If any of you want specifics, details, or info on what happened on when i got mugged, please feel free to ask. I simply didnít put it in here to avoid making this a 30 minute read.

    Thanks,
    jason
    Read any books. Absorb its contents. You're bound to find many good things in any book about firearms. Most likely your college doesn't allow firearms on campus. I would just leave it home. Cant hurt to ask though. Just don't tell them your name :)

    As far as california goes, like anywhere. Get to know the officers in your area. Volunteer if you can. Get active so they know you're not dumb. That's the best thing you can do. Taking classes about firearms will definitely help if they question your impairment.

    I don't know about your state, but my state requires that you apply in the town you reside in. I can't help you with shortcuts, sorry.

    I remember when I carried my first gun. I was very self-conscious about it as well. One thing you have to remember is that 99 percent of the people in this country wouldn't recognize a gun on your hip even if it WAS sticking out. It's that one percent you have to worry about because the stakes are so high that one screw-up could cost your freedom. I know, that doesn't really make you feel any better. Personally, it wasn't the profiling that scared me. I was worried about the trigger getting pulled while walking around. Completely "impossible", but still. I started carrying with a Bersa Thunder 380 originally because the gun has nice quality for the price. It also has a manual safety so the pin would roll over slightly thus preventing the hammer from hitting it. This really helped me during those first awkward months. Just make sure you keep the safety on (if applicable, but also metaphorically) for a while until you know better.

    And please, don't shoot me :)

  7. #6
    This could all be null and void for you shortly. Getting a permit in Kalifornia is next to impossible.

    I concur with the advice in the previous posts.

    As for holsters, try a few different models. Some companies, like Supertuck, offer money back guarantees if you're not satisfied. I have a Bob Mernickle holster for my 1911. Most people would have a hard time concealing a 1911 with the types of shirts you have listed. I could never pull it off and would have to carry my Kahr CW9 (9mm) or Ruger SP101 (snub nosed 5 shot .357 revolver).

    I highly recommend additional training; it's money well spent. At a minimum, get some personal training with a certified instructor in your area.

    Some excellent books are:

    Armed Response by David Kenik
    The Concealed Handgun Manual by Chris Bird
    Tactical Pistol Marksmanship by Gabe Suarez
    Effective Handgun Defense by Frank James
    Combat Handgunnery by Masaad Ayood

    I've been having some hearing problems myself. Mostly it's severe tinitus and the ringing, especially in the right ear, is drowning everything else out. My advice, avoid those dark alleys and be extra cautious about letting anyone in your comfort zone, especially when there aren't other people around.

    Hope this helps, best of luck to you.
    "When the outflow exceeds the inflow, the upkeep becomes the downfall"

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Anchorage, AK formerly of SF, Kommiefornia
    Posts
    5
    I have to make this quik because my computer has been messing up lately.

    First, thanks for all the advice. I will be looking into a school for training. Does anyone have suggestions for a school that has a good training:price ratio? Preferably something with pistol and carbine training (I have an FAL).

    I think I'm going to try an order a Andrews Custom Leather McDaniels II rig. I've heard a lot about it. My holster has become more comfortable as I experiment with it, and have carried it all day without much discomfort. Though I wonder how much it prints when I bend over or squat.

    I do not have a CCW permit. Here in Alaska it's ok to carry concealed without a permit. I also have a good amount of firearms experience, though most of it has been rifles in smallbore & highpower competition. I've shot my father's Beretta 96 quite a few times (though the rounds number in the hundreds, not thousands)

    As for my hearing issues, I will try to figure out a way to deal with it until I get tips from a firearms insructor. Likewise I will not travel off of mainstreet until I have more experience.

    I've been keeping an eye out for no gun signs, and have found they're typically on the doors to the building. I've avoided these places until I can get back home, drop off my pistol and go again.

    As for "canting" I mean the front to back "lean" of the holster setup. And remoistening I meant reholstering. I must've been thinking about how my cigar humidor needed to be remoistened.

    Thanks!
    Jason

  9. First time CCW

    Jason,
    First off, ask yourself what your life is worth. The best school I know of is Front Sight, at Pahrump, Nevada. They have a great deal on a lifetime membership on their website at Front Sight Firearms Training Institute. Dr. Ignatius Piazza is a millionaire who wants to help save your life. The school has doubled in size and membership for each of the past twelve years, and teaches more students than all other schools combined. They offer courses in everything from unarmed combat, through knife fighting, tactical pistol, rifle, submachine gun and select fire M-16 A lifetime membership means you can take any course at any time you wish, and includes goodies like the dry-fire manuals, a belt, holster, magazine holder and a new gun. Being on a very fixed income, I am unable to take advantage of Dr. Piazza's invitation, but I recommend it for those who can swing it. I just read about a retired Marine whose two sons are soon to be deployed to Iraq, so he paid for them to go to Front Sight and take all the classes. They make the claim, and I don't question it, that they provide a level of instruction better than any police SWAT or military training. As for a CCW permit in Kaliphony, good luck. One of the very best books available is one I have heard almost everyone I respect for thier gun knowledge recommends is Bill Jordan's 'No Second Place Winners.' Bill was a Border Patrolman and I believe a Texas Ranger at one point. He made many contributions to hte rules of gunhandling and surviving a gunfright.
    Last edited by wuzfuz; 01-22-2009 at 05:33 PM.
    A man without a gun is a subject; a man with a gun is a citizen.
    I'll keep my freedom, my guns and my money. You can keep THE CHANGE.
    An armed society is a polite society.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Honolulu, HI & Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    2,797
    Jason:

    Keep in mind the old saying "you get what you pay for". Here on this board, there are folks with varying levels of firearms experience. Some have had extensive training, others are just starting out. BE VERY CAREFUL when taking advice from this site, or anything you read on the internet for that matter.

    With that said, I'll get into my recommendations for selecting a firearms training school. I won't publicly endorse or slam any particular school. Here's my recommendation for evaluating a school before spending your hard earned money.

    1. Check out the instructors. It's critical that an instructor have experience in the field in which you are being trained. That "I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night" line doesn't cut it. You wouldn't want a football commentator teaching you how to perform open heart surgery would you? Same goes for firearms trainers. How can an individual who's never seen combat tell you "This is what you'll need to know when you're in combat"? My first question would be "How do you know?" A lot of schools out there have instructors who like to tell you what "being shot at" is like, yet they themselves have NEVER been shot at. This says a lot about their credibility and integrity. I would not take a class from an instructor who has openly lied about his/her training and/or experience.

    2. Check out their facility and get as much information as possible. Many schools have websites. Check 'um out. See where they're located and what kind of training programs they have to offer. I would rather take a class from a school that does one type of training and does it well than a school that offers many types of training by instructors who have little or no experience. There are some schools that do a great job of marketing their classes. Like any product you see on television, internet, etc., check it out. Many of the reputable schools list past clients like police departments, military units, etc. Don't be afraid to contact these "references" and see how the training went. For example, "ABC Tactical Training Academy" may list the "25th Infantry Division" as a past client. I would call the individual in charge of training for the Army unit (usually the Training NCO) and see how they liked the training. As you may be aware, many soldiers from the 25th Infantry Division have been to places like Iraq and Afghanistan. They'll tell you how "relevant" and "realistic" the training was. I've had military units tell me that a particular school had an instructor who was full of [insert explative here]. Phrases like "waste of money", "not worth it", etc. were mentioned. That's a good indication that the training may not be all that it's cracked up to be.

    3. Ask a lot of questions. Most reputable instructors won't be afraid to answer questions. Ask relevant questions, and be as brief and to the point as possible. Stuff like "is there a McDonald's nearby" isn't something I'm talking about. Relevant questions like "do you have many students come back to take other courses?" "do you have any advanced courses?" Stuff like that.

    I would again like to caution you as to who you are receiving information from here online. If something doesn't sound quite right, don't be afraid to call "bull scat". There are folks on here that will talk volumes about a particular school, yet have never been there. Be very careful. YMMV

    Feel free to PM me if you have any questions or would like my personal opinions on anything I've posted here online.


    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  11. Very true Glock Fan! Always keep that disclaimer in mind, though most people here willingly state that it's just advice, not professional advice.
    "I'd rather be judged by 12 than carried by six"
    -Sgt. Jeremy Clark WHPD

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