Spoke to a Judge... What is he talking about? - Page 5
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Thread: Spoke to a Judge... What is he talking about?

  1. #41
    Just a thought. Was the judge referring to you emptying your gun on an assailant who was no longer a threat? If you stop someones unlawful agression by legal gunfire then continue to fire illegally after they are no longer a threat then you have become the agressor and yes you will be charged with manslaughter. Sorry thats the facts.

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  3. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    South Mississippi
    Posts
    91
    I always stagger my loads. JHP, then a FMJ, then a JHP, then a... you get the picture. You will never have the time to load what is required (as you will never know what is required). So, I know for a fact that every second round will either penetrate the door, window, wall (if required); or will be able to give maximum stopping power to a soft target.

  4. I read somewhere that cocked and locked carry was illegal in Clark county, Nevada. No verification on that.

    I wouldn't carry reloads for two reasons: Commercial manufacturers hav e stringent standards for processes and components which even the most careful home reloader would be hard pressed to duplicate. Also, there will always be that prosecutor who says something like "Oh, Mr. Guntoter, so commercial ammunition wasn't deadly enough for you. You had to go home and brew up extra-lethal bullets of your own". Makes defending you harder.

    While we're on the subject, mark the box from which you take your carry ammo as being carry ammo, date it and sign it. Stay with that lot number when you replace any round such as the round in chamber. If there is a dispute with the prosecutor over the circumstances of the shooting (such as distance), gunshot residue could be a crucial part of the case. Not being able to recreate those circumstances also makes your lawyer's job harder.

  5. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by eng View Post
    I wouldn't carry reloads for two reasons: Commercial manufacturers hav e stringent standards for processes and components which even the most careful home reloader would be hard pressed to duplicate. Also, there will always be that prosecutor who says something like "Oh, Mr. Guntoter, so commercial ammunition wasn't deadly enough for you. You had to go home and brew up extra-lethal bullets of your own". Makes defending you harder.

    While we're on the subject, mark the box from which you take your carry ammo as being carry ammo, date it and sign it. Stay with that lot number when you replace any round such as the round in chamber. If there is a dispute with the prosecutor over the circumstances of the shooting (such as distance), gunshot residue could be a crucial part of the case. Not being able to recreate those circumstances also makes your lawyer's job harder.
    The other issue that could be raised with handloads, is that of premeditation. You deliberately manufactured rounds that would have different gunshot residue patterns than factory ammo. Thus you made an advanced decision, premeditation, to alter the forensic evidence in the case. If there are any issues to where gunshot residue evidence becomes a factor, the investigators can usually obtain rounds that would duplication or at least closely simulation a factory round. You don't get that option with handloads.

    I don't think it is a good idea to carry handloads for the above reasons.

    Also, being a rational person, I have to ask, what do you gain from using handloads as opposed to factory loads? IMHO, the reliability of good factory ammo exceeds that of almost all handloaders. Any gains in balistic performance created by hot handloads need to be looked at with the following question, is the ammo safely loaded to SAAMI specs for the cartridge in question? In most cases the ammo factories you powder blends that are not available to the average reloaded, sometimes this allows them to get an extra 100 fps. of muzzle velocity and still be within proper safety specs. Are you going to do the level of load testing that ammo factories are going to do?

    I do not see any signifigant gain in using handloads for defense. I do see some legal issues. Therefore I rationally conlude that there is not enough of a gain, if any, to justify using handloads that would offset the potential legal complications.

  6. #45
    With the caveats from the above post being kept in mind, I do not see any reason not to carry hollowpoints unless they are illegal in your jurisdiction. If you want to carry 165gr. Remington Golden Saber loaded in your sidearm, go right ahead it's a fine load. If you would rather carry 155gr. CCI Gold Dot Hollowpoints, that is also a good load in 40S&W. Whatever your factory load of choice is, make sure you keep the original box. Another poster may have alluded to this, but if you are involved in a shooting that requires examination of gunshot residue, the box has the factory lot numbers on. This information can be useful to forensic investigators as they can usually obtain ammo from the same lot from the manufacturer. Also do not mix and match ammo in the same magazine as this complicates matters. A previous poster mentioned recording on the box when you loaded the ammo into what firearm, that's probably not a bad idea.

  7. #46
    There was a shooting in my home town in Pennsylvania. A man walks out of a bar after shooting pool. Another man follows him outside yelling slurs at him. After the man tries to leave, the other individual stands in front of his truck. The first man then gets out of his truck, pulls out a 25 auto and shoots into the ground. The man comes at him yelling shoot me, so he does, right in the stomach. Sounds like self defense?
    The D.A. charges him with attempted murder. I would love to be called for that jury

  8. Self defense is not a crime of violence, is it?

  9. I guess I need to be careful then, because I bought a Kimber 45 as my carry gun on Wednesday. I can't fathom that the caliber would have anything to do with it.

  10. Quote Originally Posted by echoawake View Post
    There was a shooting in my home town in Pennsylvania. A man walks out of a bar after shooting pool. Another man follows him outside yelling slurs at him. After the man tries to leave, the other individual stands in front of his truck. The first man then gets out of his truck, pulls out a 25 auto and shoots into the ground. The man comes at him yelling shoot me, so he does, right in the stomach. Sounds like self defense?
    The D.A. charges him with attempted murder. I would love to be called for that jury
    I'm kind of confused as to why the man got out and fired a warning shot? Being in the military, even within a self-defense case we are held liable by SECNAVINST 5500.29 (Use of Deadly Force). According to that instruction, the use of warning shots is not authorized.

    When regarding the right to carry, drawing your weapon means you have intent to use deadly force. Warning shots, regardless if you're military or not, are not a good idea. Was this man a lethal threat standing in front of his truck? I don't think so. If he was holding a gun or knife and blocking his path, it would be different.

  11. #50
    The warning shot was not the point I was trying to make. The other man has had problems before with beating up people and is a known bully. The shooter tried to get away. Even after being shot, the man was advancing and trying to beat him. There was mention of a weapon on the man that was shot but no one is talking.

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