Inform the officer or not when concealed carry? - Page 16
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Thread: Inform the officer or not when concealed carry?

  1. I have a CCW In Nevada and Oklahoma. Nevada to answer the Off. questions. In Oklahoma you must notify the Off. you have a CCW license and if you are carring or not

  2.   
  3. I'm new to this forum (first post) and have just submitted my application for a CCW in the state of Connecticut. I had a range permit when I was a NY resident about 10 years ago but never was in a situation where I needed to inform a LEO that I had a permit.

    Does anyone know what the CT requirements are during a traffic stop? I was told in training that you should keep both hands on the wheel and inform the LEO that you have a CCW; however, it wasn't stated if it is required or just good practice.

  4. #153
    to me,imho.weather or not i have to , i definitely would.i taught the family if they r ever driving with guns to the range ,give the officer your drivers license & foid card & tell them u have a weapon & ammo in the car.it's just the right thing to do

  5. #154
    Quote Originally Posted by Montducati View Post
    I'm new to this forum (first post) and have just submitted my application for a CCW in the state of Connecticut. I had a range permit when I was a NY resident about 10 years ago but never was in a situation where I needed to inform a LEO that I had a permit.

    Does anyone know what the CT requirements are during a traffic stop? I was told in training that you should keep both hands on the wheel and inform the LEO that you have a CCW; however, it wasn't stated if it is required or just good practice.
    It is not required by law in CT.
    The two enemies of the people are criminals and government, so let us tie the second down with the chains of the Constitution so the second will not become the legalized version of the first. - Thomas Jefferson

  6. Montducati - welcome to the forums and to CT gun ownership.

    CT law does not require you to notify the officer. That is the central point being discussed here - whether or not notification is a good idea. There are many valid points on both sides of the discussion.

    CT law requires that you obtain the permit in order to take a pistol anywhere except to your home or your place of business directly from the point of purchase. And just to obtain that certificate you have to go 90% of the way through the permit process; for another few bucks i strongly recommend getting the permit. At least then you can take your pistol to a range and learn how (or practice) to shoot it. And heavens - you might want to buy another. What a ridiculous law that would allow you to buy a handgun but forbid you to actually practice with it - but that's what we have until we get it changed.

    Of course, under Federal law you are allowed to transport your unloaded, cased pistol out of state to a place you are legally entitled to possess it.
    "Laws that forbid the carrying of arms ... make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants ... for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man." - Thomas Jefferson

  7. If its not required - dont do it!

    Just remember that you were trying to be "friendly" while they have you face down on the pavement in cuffs trying to sort things out...

  8. #157
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Syracuse, Utah, USA
    Posts
    20

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by Pele View Post
    Officer comes to the door and asks for your license and registration... Do you inform him that you are in possession of a concealed handgun or not?
    I am not a lawyer. The following is my opinion.

    First, find out the law in your area. If the law required you to notify, abide by the law.

    There are two schools of thought on what comes next.

    One says don't tell the officer anything more than what you're legally required to and exercise your right to remain silent.

    The other says to be open and cooperative.

    It's up to you to decide how to proceed.

    If you are in a state that requires a permit to carry a firearm, when the officer asks you for your license and registration also pass him/her your carry permit. If they then ask you if you are carrying a firearm you can reply that you have a permit and are legally allowed to do so. It's not answering their question per se, but it is notifying them that you are legally allowed to do so.

    If they ask again, you can either respond by asking "am I legally required to answer that?" or answer specifically in a manner such as "my sidearm is on my right hip".

    Remember, when you answer, you are required to answer truthfully; HOWEVER, LEOs are under no such requirement to be truthful to you. Furthermore, anything you say WILL be used against you. So unless you're asked specifically, it's best not to answer; in other words, don't volunteer information.

    - JoeLevi.com, http://www.sittingduckpolicy.com

  9. #158
    Quote Originally Posted by joelevi View Post
    I am not a lawyer. The following is my opinion.

    First, find out the law in your area. If the law required you to notify, abide by the law.

    There are two schools of thought on what comes next.

    One says don't tell the officer anything more than what you're legally required to and exercise your right to remain silent.

    The other says to be open and cooperative.

    It's up to you to decide how to proceed.

    If you are in a state that requires a permit to carry a firearm, when the officer asks you for your license and registration also pass him/her your carry permit. If they then ask you if you are carrying a firearm you can reply that you have a permit and are legally allowed to do so. It's not answering their question per se, but it is notifying them that you are legally allowed to do so.

    If they ask again, you can either respond by asking "am I legally required to answer that?" or answer specifically in a manner such as "my sidearm is on my right hip".

    Remember, when you answer, you are required to answer truthfully; HOWEVER, LEOs are under no such requirement to be truthful to you. Furthermore, anything you say WILL be used against you. So unless you're asked specifically, it's best not to answer; in other words, don't volunteer information.

    - JoeLevi.com, Sitting Duck Policy | Are you a Sitting Duck?
    My problem with bolded...is that you are saying anybody who does not inform is not be cooperative...

  10. Quote Originally Posted by Daugherty16 View Post
    CT law does not require you to notify the officer. That is the central point being discussed here - whether or not notification is a good idea. There are many valid points on both sides of the discussion.

    CT law requires that you obtain the permit in order to take a pistol anywhere except to your home or your place of business directly from the point of purchase. And just to obtain that certificate you have to go 90% of the way through the permit process; for another few bucks i strongly recommend getting the permit. At least then you can take your pistol to a range and learn how (or practice) to shoot it. And heavens - you might want to buy another. What a ridiculous law that would allow you to buy a handgun but forbid you to actually practice with it - but that's what we have until we get it changed.

    Of course, under Federal law you are allowed to transport your unloaded, cased pistol out of state to a place you are legally entitled to possess it.
    Check out that Federal Law again.... my understanding is that it entitles you to transport from a place where you are legally entitled to possess same to another place where you are legally entitled to possess same, and that there is plenty of dark grey spots inasmuch as it does not address, for example, long trips where you are going to stay in a hotel or motel overnight. Personally, I have two Harbour Freight minisafes in the back of my Ford Flex; one for unloaded handguns and the other for magazines and ammunition stored seperately. They are pushbutton locks and I carry the backup keys on my car keychain and never hand them out to anyone I don't want to have access to my firearms. I have never had a problem except once when I was inspected after advising how I was transporting - asked to open the backhatch - LEO took a look, shook his head and waved me on. THAT is why I always hand over my permit with my D/L and registration. It is a common courtesy and I have yet to speak to or meet a LEO that does not appreciate the courtesy.

    Just my opinion and there are obviously many - most of which are correct in their own right. This is just the way I do it... and it works for me. And I do a heck of a lot of driving from state to state (probably more than 98 percent of the population).

  11. Any shorthand is going to omit certain factors

    but rather than cite the entire statute, i'll just provide the citation and folks can look it up at their leisure.
    The Firearms Owners Protection Act of 1986 (FOPA)can be found at:18 USC Section 921 et seq. or public law 99-308 : http://uscode.house.gov/download/pls/18C44.txt

    Here's a link to the NRA-ILA summary guide for interstate transportation of firearms: NRA-ILA ::

    And here is an excellent detailed review of the FOPA: THE FIREARMS OWNERS' PROTECTION ACT: A HISTORICAL AND LEGAL PERSPECTIVE

    This email doesn't puport to provide legal advice. Consult an attorney for that.
    "Laws that forbid the carrying of arms ... make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants ... for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man." - Thomas Jefferson

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