How Long Before You CC With a Bullet In the Chamber? - Page 3
Page 3 of 14 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 138

Thread: How Long Before You CC With a Bullet In the Chamber?

  1. Quote Originally Posted by Glockster20 View Post
    A 3.5lb trigger on a Glock??? I own several Glocks and every one of them came with a 5.5lb trigger right out of the box. In fact, the official Glock website shows a standard 5.5lb. trigger with every one of their models. It is under technical data. Just fyi...
    Measure the pull on a G30 that's had a few hundred rounds through it and let me know what you find. Curious. Maybe what I got were modified? They go bang at 3.5Lb.

  2.   
  3. Conditions Of Carry | Guns Magazine | Find Articles at BNET

    An excellent article by Clint Smith; worthy of a 100 percent read by all concealed carriers.

  4. I carried my Glock for a month without any ammo at all in the chamber or clip because it was new to me and I initally felt "wrong" doing it. Then I loaded it completely, including 1 in the chamber. I have been doing it ever since. My NRA instructor and his partner, a LEO, told us at the CCW classes that you should always carry a full clip and the gun should be chambered. Their point was that if you ever need to draw it is ready to fire. Statistically (they rattled off some stats that I now don't recall) there is no time to think about chambering a round in a deadly situation and you put your life in danger. Remember the bad guy has his gun chambered already and pointed at you!

  5. #24
    I've kept one in the pipe ever since I got my permit. what if you only have one hand free? makes it a lot harder to chamber a round. all of my pistols have either a frame mounted safety or a slide mounted safety and when I carry they are off. the trigger pull on a DA/SA pistol is heavy enough on that first round to not have to worry about an AD.
    You can have my freedom as soon as I'm done with it!!!

  6. Wow. This is getting far too bizarre for me. I just want to reiterate that some guns are 'safer' than others. To carry with the safety 'off' simply says to me that there is a major lack of training and practice there. I carry and use 1911 Para P1640's for IPSC and they have a safety. Cocked and locked is how I carry them, with one in the tube. But it's an outside the waist holster and it's a limited set of circumstances... nontheless, the loss of time on the drawstroke is exactly zero due to the thumb safety and they have the added bonus of having a grip safety. I would not think about not carrying with the safety on since there is no loss of time if you have trained.

    There are so many different guns, situations, methods of carry and so on it is a book on its own. Carry however you are comfy? Bad idea. Carry however your training has dictated to you that you are safe, fast and accurate.

    For me, like I have said, I am comfy with concealed carrying my Glocks as long as they have heavier trigger pulls, I am comfy carrying my Sigs because they DO have heavier trigger pulls out of the box (on the models I carry) and I am ecstatic carrying the HK P7M8's cause they are squeeze cockers and all I need to do is squeeze the grip during the drawstroke and I'm in business.

    Carry with one in the chamber? Every piece of literature and study and article that I have read by anyone that knows anything seems to indicate that a round in the chamber is a must but so is training and gun selection and trigger status (shave a couple of pounds off some triggers and you can have your gun go full auto on you unexprectedly - another consideration).

    Not only do you want to survive a lethal force encounter fellows; you also want to survive the aftermath and you want your family to do likewise. Fire a manstopper shot with that first round, have the BG turn to run and pop another round or two into his back as a result of loss of control of your digits or as a result of your gun going auto because you played with the trigger and you are going to be in a world of hurt.

    Revolvers, I repeat again, are great carry pieces as that cylinder has to turn in order for the next round to fire, giving you an indication that it is coming and also (unless you have played with it or are using a target pistol instead of a carry gun) a heavier trigger pull naturally.

    Decide on what you are going to be doing with that gun of yours and how you are going to be carrying it and THEN decide in advance that you are serious about carrying and willing to invest in the training and practice and then, and only then, holster up.

    Carrying with or without one in the chamber is not your only decision but it is an important one and one that Ayoob has much to say about and I refer you to him and his blogs and articles to get educated as what you are getting on here, including MY tirade, is simply conjecture. Get your info from a pro; someone considered an expert in the field and an expert witness in any court in the land.

    You will discover that there is a lot more to carrying than just deciding to carry with or without one in the tube but that carrying one in the tube is a big decision on its own. Did you realize that carrying one in the tube, should you have a lethal force encounter, is going to treble your pain? You will be portrayed as a ruthless gunman just out looking for a victim. Triple your legal bills if it goes to court and it likely will. AND you had better read up on what you should have in that chamber as well. According to most pro's it had better not be a homeload.

    Anyway, my point is that you need to make this decision for yourself understanding that you are going to be in reactionary mode and that you are going to be in "fight or flight" mode as well with the associated loss of hearing, tunnel vision, loss of physical control of your digits and perhaps even your sphincter muscle and so on.

    I have decided that for ME I was prepared to take the training and take on the practice necessary to carry with one in the tube as it is important. You need to think about doing the same and carrying a gun that is both safe and comfortable for you.

    A light trigger pull, a home load, a poor holster.... you are an accident waiting to happen despite all of the words to the contrary my friend.

    The bottom line as we always say is "be safe out there" and that includes AFTER the incident and it includes not shooting yourself in the thigh or foot. And for crying out loud stay away from those shoulder hoslters that point your muzzle at whatever is behind you. They are called 'the jackass rig" for a reason.

    So much to learn - and time to train. A serious decision to be followed by a serious commitment.

    BTW, we have had two home invasions (one with entry made) here and have had a gun put in our face in the home of Mickey in Orlando. I can assure you that there are few asides from LEO's out there that have taken this decision to own lethal force and to use lethal force when necessary more so than I.

    Be safe. And never mind this business of keeping your finger off the trigger will keep you safe or that your brain is the best safety. Sure they are great ideas but in real life it simply does not work that way unfortunately, regardless of what ANYONE might tell you.

  7. Quote Originally Posted by Glock513 View Post
    I carried my Glock for a month without any ammo at all in the chamber or clip because it was new to me and I initally felt "wrong" doing it. Then I loaded it completely, including 1 in the chamber. I have been doing it ever since. My NRA instructor and his partner, a LEO, told us at the CCW classes that you should always carry a full clip and the gun should be chambered. Their point was that if you ever need to draw it is ready to fire. Statistically (they rattled off some stats that I now don't recall) there is no time to think about chambering a round in a deadly situation and you put your life in danger. Remember the bad guy has his gun chambered already and pointed at you!
    Not only that, he may have already taken the decision to leave not witnesses; his gun in cocked and unlocked; he doesn't care much about anything except doing you in. And you are in REACTIONARY mode at this point. You can, depending on circumstances, take the decision to try and put the BAD GUY in reactionary mode by making a rapid move, especially to cover, etc. but if you are not prepared to take a rapid shot out of your holster you are in deep trouble. I have read all the statistics and it is true that you do NOT have the time to chamber a round and keep ahead of the curve here.

    In fact, you don't even have to be at gunpoint in order to be behind the curve. Anyone out there take lethal force training and get disarmed from 20 feet by a 'pro'? Well, I have. And I was told that I was going to be disarmed in advance. By the time I drew and did all the business to get off that shot I was without gun and had a broken finger dangling by the skin. Remember that with a revolver all the bad guy has to do is grab the cylinder to take the gun out of battery. Cylinder doesn't turn, gun doesn't fire. Unless you are single action and cocked. Bad idea. And with an semi auto do you know how far the slide needs to be moved backwards in order to disable the gun? It's a fraction of an inch. And no bang. Lethal force on force encounters are not simply a matter of having a gun with one in the chamber - far from it. Not only do we need to gear up but we need to smarten up as well and that means training and practice.

    Ever had a gun pointed at your nose? I promise you that even getting your stuff together to attempt a drawstroke is going to seem impossible. I know it was for me. I was just lucky the guy was high as a kite and I was in my car with the gearshift in GO.

  8. One in the pipe since day one. Without it, your carrying a pipe.

  9. My response may have been incorrect here. I just noticed, "safety off" on a DA/SA handgun. If the pull is heavy enough for safety in DA mode I would have no trouble carrying safety off; but having said that, I cannot see any time lost on the drawstroke while flipping off the safety and you do have one more line of prevention against an AD/ND.

    I am vehemently against light 'target pistol' trigger pulls - the mess they can cause in the aftermath of a lethal force encounter can be disasterous. Combine this with another common error, like carrying a homeload or taking a second or third shot while the bad guy is turning to escape and you are in a world of trouble.

    I stand corrected.

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    South Haven, Michigan
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by torontogunguy View Post
    If the pull is heavy enough for safety in DA mode I would have no trouble carrying safety off; but having said that, I cannot see any time lost on the drawstroke while flipping off the safety and you do have one more line of prevention against an AD/ND.
    In a self-defense type situation, you don't want to rely on fine motor skills because those are the first to go!

    Your finger should be the only safety you need, however, just remember that if you ever need to defend yourself, you'll fall back to your training. So if you don't feel comfortable with your safety off, you need to practice turning it off in your training.

    Do some pushups until exhaustion, and then train, because that's how you'll probably feel in a real world situation (or so I've been told anyway!)

  11. #30
    With your XD-40 (or any XD), you are always in 'safety' mode until you slip your finger onto the trigger. No problem with safely carrying with one in the pipe.

    And anyone who is using a holster where the trigger is exposed when fully seated is asking for trouble in the first place. Any holster should completely cover the trigger and trigger guard. And with a good holster, sitting down is NOT going to make the gun go off, because there in no way the trigger can be accessed.

    And as the others have said, in a compromised situation, you will not have time to rack a round. The situation will most likely be close quarters, and the BG is going to have a loaded gun. If you have to cock your XD, you will: probably fumble in the anxiety of the situation, and even if you are quick, the BG already has the advantage.

    Simply, get used to carrying with one in the chamber. You have a good gun in the XD. It isn't going to go off accidentally.
    -= Piece Corps =-

Page 3 of 14 FirstFirst 1234513 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Quantcast