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Thread: CWP badge

  1. Strongly disagree. There can be no better way to identify yourself as a CCW holder than to present a cop with a badge identifying yourself as such............. cops know badges!
    (sic)

  2.   
  3. Please Lord.......let me out of purgatory. I promise I'll be good from now on.

  4. So my question for those that have posted on this thread is this. Say I have an encounter with a group of armed suspects in a public location. There is no way of knowing how many private citizens are carrying or how many off duty LEOs are carrying at this particular location. Would one of these badges located in a wallet that can be brought out and seen by others make another ccw holder take a second to decide whether to shoot or not.

    A CCW holder has not had as much training in situation response a LEO and may be more prone to shoot anyone holding a gun in the immediate area of the afore mentioned situation.

    I do NOT intend to impersonate an officer or have this badge visible at all times. I do intend to avoid being shot in a situation where I am there to protect innocent lives until the police arrive.

  5. #54
    Join Date
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    Sorry guys but I think this is the dumbest topic. I agree with you Torontoguy
    "Please Lord.......let me out of purgatory. I promise I'll be good from now on."

  6. #55

    CCW Badges

    In Florida those of us that carry are urged NOT to get a CCW Badge as from a distance they could be mis-construed as an official LEO badge which carries severe penalties down here. I've had CCW licenses for 43 years and subscribe to the theory that the pistol and the license are always on me and out of site.

    ****

  7. I have two wallets.

    Right one is most used, has driver's license and most of my credit cards.

    Left one has Concealed Pistol License and some other stuff (spare keys for my motorcycle). As it happens, it also has a high quality gold colored badge: Washington Arms Collectors Life Member. I wear it at WAC gun shows. It is not visible when the wallet is opened, unless I lift the flap covering it.

    Although I have NO desire to flash any sort of badge in the normal course of events, it occurs there might be a possible use: If that "gravest extreme" event transpires, and I find myself standing over a gang banger or two, holding my gun (because I'm not certain that all threats have been neutralized) while they assume ambient temperature amidst an expanding red pool, I would naturally have called 911. When arriving LEO's come roaring up, there just MIGHT be a trigger-happy rookie in the bunch. If I was holding my CPL (visible through the clear window in my open left wallet) as high as possible in my left hand, and the flap covering that WAC badge just happened to have come open, that "shiny thing" visible at the right second might keep me from being shot. Naturally, I'd be saying "I have a Concealed Pistol License," and if the badge was noticed I'd immediately apologize that the cover had come open and emphasize that I'm not a cop.

    As a former Volunteer Fire Chief, I'm curious about that "wear a badge and be charged with impersonating an officer" law. What about firemen or others who have badges and are not cops? Even dog catchers and code enforcement officers have badges in some areas. Guess I'll have to do some detailed research on the law in my own state of Washington.
    “The police of a State should never be stronger or better armed than the citizenry. An armed citizenry, willing to fight is the foundation of civil freedom.” Heinlein

  8. #57
    Join Date
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    Badges for ordinary citizens are unnecessary. They are potentially more harmful than helpful. If ever in a SD situation, there will be more pressing things on your mind than to pull out your wallet with your toy badge. Once the threat has passed, unload, reholster your firearm, call for medical attention if necessary, contact law enforcement, calm down and wait for the police to show up. Be cooperative, but don't admit to anything. Seek medical attention, as I assure you that it's in your best interest.

    Most importantly, if your job doesn't require you to carry a badge, DON'T DO IT!!!! I've seen many people get into trouble for carrying badges and other items that they had no business carrying in the first place.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  9. [quoteIf ever in a SD situation, there will be more pressing things on your mind than to pull out your wallet with your toy badge. ][/quote]

    If in such a situation, what I'll have on my mind is SURVIVAL -- surviving any other hostiles who may be around, surviving gung-ho, scared, heavily armed cops who respond, even surviving the local court system and going home a free man. If the reflection thrown by my "toy badge" (can't recall if it's an extra $65 or $85 w/ life membership, but it's equal in quality to most cop badges) will decrease my odds of getting shot, it's a good thing. If it increases my odds of getting hurt, it's a bad thing.
    “The police of a State should never be stronger or better armed than the citizenry. An armed citizenry, willing to fight is the foundation of civil freedom.” Heinlein

  10. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glock Fan View Post
    ... there will be more pressing things on your mind than to pull out your wallet with your toy badge.

  11. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hamilton Felix View Post
    If in such a situation, what I'll have on my mind is SURVIVAL -- surviving any other hostiles who may be around, surviving gung-ho, scared, heavily armed cops who respond, even surviving the local court system and going home a free man. If the reflection thrown by my "toy badge" (can't recall if it's an extra $65 or $85 w/ life membership, but it's equal in quality to most cop badges) will decrease my odds of getting shot, it's a good thing. If it increases my odds of getting hurt, it's a bad thing.
    Being a trainer for both civilians and LE, I realize that there are differences in how each group operates. Without giving away too much info and in an effort to quash "Mall Ninja Mania", I will say that LEO are trained how to identify themselves while not in uniform WITH THEIR VOICES AND ACTIONS. Reaching for any items in your pockets, etc., when armed uniformed officers are responding may result in things turning out very bad for you.

    Carry the tin if you wish, but IMHO, it will be more trouble than it's worth. In some jurisdictions, mere possession of an unauthorized badge is a criminal offense. Not only will YOU need to deal with the consequences (criminal, civil or both), but you will probably make the news and make responsible gun owners and CC permit/license holders look bad. The media isn't always our friend. With that in mind, we need to do what we can to demonstrate that we are responsible law abiding citizens.

    Going back to your badge scenario, weather it will prevent you from getting shot or not, will depend on many factors. Consider the fact that you manage to hang your badge around your neck. You're moving around in "survival mode" looking for a way out of the situation. There happens to be another BG who sees your badge. He hides around a corner and ambushes you. In this case the badge did not prevent you from getting shot. It actually encouraged an assailant to attack you.

    Do as you wish with regard to badges. As long as you're in compliance with local law it's your right. I do not recommend it to my students as the benefits are far outweighed by the risks.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

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